LCA Tejas Mk1 & Mk1A - News and discussions

RedCannon

Member
Dec 4, 2017
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Not possible as the fuselage has one hardpoint for fuel tan and the sides are unlikely to be big enough to hold the 15 feet long meteor. Landing gear will come in the way. They are only good for pods and cannon
The one central hard point for fuel tank could be rather used for 2 A2A missiles using a twin pylon. Atleast that is what was suggested by @vstol Jockey and inner hardpoint on wings can carry fueltanks. Also from what i remember length of meteor was less than the external fuel tank

If you are suggesting about an extra hard point by moving the gun then yes that one i agree can only be used for pod
 
Dec 4, 2017
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The one central hard point for fuel tank could be rather used for 2 A2A missiles using a twin pylon. Atleast that is what was suggested by @vstol Jockey and inner hardpoint on wings can carry fueltanks. Also from what i remember length of meteor was less than the external fuel tank

If you are suggesting about an extra hard point by moving the gun then yes that one i agree can only be used for pod

The central hardpoint can carry 800-1000kg weight. Why would you make it inefficient by making it carry 185gx2 missile? It is btter to use the central wing hard point for this racing of BVR missiles.

I was speaking of replacing cannon with missile. I know that racking is an easy thing to do
 
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RedCannon

Member
Dec 4, 2017
31
17
The central hardpoint can carry 800-1000kg weight. Why would you make it inefficient by making it carry 185gx2 missile? It is btter to use the central wing hard point for this racing of BVR missiles.

I was speaking of replacing cannon with missile. I know that racing is an easy thing to do

As such its already very inefficient, why do you think it has 1000 kg limit while for almost in all other aircrafts the central hard point carries highest weight. The restriction is because there is no space to carry anything heavier than that.
The thing is if it can carry 2 missiles on central hardpoint then suddenly it can carry 6 missiles + 2 drop tank in A2A mode and 4 missiles + 2 bombs + 2 drop tank in A2G mode which is a respectable load out.
 

Sathya

Senior member
Dec 2, 2017
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The central hardpoint can carry 800-1000kg weight. Why would you make it inefficient by making it carry 185gx2 missile? It is btter to use the central wing hard point for this racing of BVR missiles.

I was speaking of replacing cannon with missile. I know that racing is an easy thing to do

by your idea, bombs can be placed under fuselage, one behind another
and mid wing station can be given the twin pylons .. that ll make 6 missiles + 2 drop tanks + 2 bombs
 

Sathya

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Dec 2, 2017
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Navy Mk2 changes compare to Mk1/MK1A

  • Wing move outwards 350mm both sides of the wing, That is 700 mm width increase in centre fuselage.
  • Stretching 1 meter lengthwise of fuselage
  • New Design will accommodate extra 700 k.g. of fuel

hard points ?
 
Dec 4, 2017
756
553
India
As such its already very inefficient, why do you think it has 1000 kg limit while for almost in all other aircrafts the central hard point carries highest weight. The restriction is because there is no space to carry anything heavier than that.
The thing is if it can carry 2 missiles on central hardpoint then suddenly it can carry 6 missiles + 2 drop tank in A2A mode and 4 missiles + 2 bombs + 2 drop tank in A2G mode which is a respectable load out.
by your idea, bombs can be placed under fuselage, one behind another
and mid wing station can be given the twin pylons .. that ll make 6 missiles + 2 drop tanks + 2 bombs
First, the A2A configuration needs AAM while A2G configuration needs LGBs, PGM and other bombs.

In A2A, it is important to make fuselage carry BVRAAM instead of bomb. Also, the centre wing hardpoint can also be racked with 2 BVR missiles instead of bombs. Thus, it can carry 6BVR, 2 WVR (Derby) and 2 fuel tanks, in total 8 missiles and 2 fuel tanks.

But, in A2G configuration, the fuselage becomes a point for carrying A2G bombs, not A2A missiles. In this scenario, the fuselage and two centre wing hardpoint is meant for these bombs while the wing tip will carry Derby for self defence. So, in total 2 WVR, 3 Bombs and 2 fuel tanks. The fuselage can also carry 800kg fuel tank and replace the two fuel tanks under wings with bombs for short to medium range missions thus carrying 1 fuel tank, 2WVR and 4 bombs.
 

Sathya

Senior member
Dec 2, 2017
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First, the A2A configuration needs AAM while A2G configuration needs LGBs, PGM and other bombs.

In A2A, it is important to make fuselage carry BVRAAM instead of bomb. Also, the centre wing hardpoint can also be racked with 2 BVR missiles instead of bombs. Thus, it can carry 6BVR, 2 WVR (Derby) and 2 fuel tanks, in total 8 missiles and 2 fuel tanks.

But, in A2G configuration, the fuselage becomes a point for carrying A2G bombs, not A2A missiles. In this scenario, the fuselage and two centre wing hardpoint is meant for these bombs while the wing tip will carry Derby for self defence. So, in total 2 WVR, 3 Bombs and 2 fuel tanks. The fuselage can also carry 800kg fuel tank and replace the two fuel tanks under wings with bombs for short to medium range missions thus carrying 1 fuel tank, 2WVR and 4 bombs.

LGBs, PGM and other bombs. .. can we place it one behind another if we move the front landing gear forward ?
 

TARGET

Well-Known member
Dec 2, 2017
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A beautiful Presentation on fighter class AESA Radar (Uttam AESA radar for LCA)
  • It’s a platform dependent development like volume, weight restriction, cooling restriction, Power supply etc, that is why it’s designed semicircular with 4,6 and 8 qtrm , so any new AESA radar will go through similar constraints…
  • AESA radar fabrication is completed for LCA and ready to fit on the plane. completely in-house project with the private and public partnership (Made in India 100%).
  • Uttam AESA radar range is 115+ Km and +_ 60-degree scan, Scan range depends upon power supply and cooling environment.
  • It’s a highly software-intensive product for various mode of scanning
  • Current status - waiting for aircraft modification and mission objective requirements gathering from user to develop the software which will exploit complete capabilities of radar.
 

lcafanboy

Senior member
Dec 22, 2017
2,489
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Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal Birender S Dhanoa with Air Marshal Singh of NFTC.
 

lcafanboy

Senior member
Dec 22, 2017
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Bangalore
HAL’s reliance on Tejas set to expand as major programmes move towards completion
Published January 5, 2018 | By admin SOURCE: Jane’s Defence Weekly
tejas-light-combat-aircraft_650x400_81487163669.jpg


HAL has so far manufactured 153 Su-30MKI fighter jets of 182 ordered at the rate of 12 aircraft per year for INR 59,420 crores (US $937 million). HAL has completed manufacturing of Hawk MK 132 trainer aircraft, only two Dornier Do-228 aircraft of 14 are left for production. Of the 159 Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH) Dhruv ordered for INR 13,799 crores (US $2.1 billion) HAL has to produce only five more. Ten Cheetal helicopters are still to be produced for INR 203 crores (US $32 million), according to ministry of defense statement Wednesday. India is spending INR 2702 crores ($426 million) for production of 20 Initial Operational Clearance (IOC) LCA Tejas aircraft and INR 5989 crores ($944 million) for 20 Final Operational Clearance (FOC) aircraft. Six aircraft have been produced so far. HAL is also awaiting an Indian Air Force order of 83 Tejas light combat aircraft valued at an approximate Rs 50,000 crore (US $7.8 billion). IAF has issued to HAL a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the same last month. The final deal for the procurement is likely to be inked within the next four months. Out of these 83 LCA, 10 will be used for training purposes. HAL plans to transfer the technology of its ALH Dhruv to a domestic defense manufacturer for commercial production. is in the process of identifying a private entity with whom it will share the technology for the production of twin-engine combat helicopter in India. It is likely to float a Request for Information (RFI) soon for identifying an Indian private agency that can produce the civilian version of the ALH Dhruv helicopters in future.

HAL’s reliance on Tejas set to expand as major programmes move towards completion - Indian Defence Research Wing .
 

lcafanboy

Senior member
Dec 22, 2017
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The desi LCA is defence ministry’s low-hanging fruit and it needs to be plucked now
MANU PUBBY 5 January, 2018



PIC2-new-696x276.jpg
A Tejas LCA lands at Yelahanka while an indigenous light combat helicopter waits to take off | MoD file photo

A quick turnaround of the Tejas light fighter is on the cards but the government needs to step up.

It has been loved, hated, coveted, admonished and even ridiculed but for India’s homegrown combat aircraft, right now might just be the right time. The light combat aircraft (LCA) is the defence ministry’s lowest hanging fruit on the ‘Make in India’ path but it needs one final big push for which the government would need to step up soon.

Two things stand in the way of the fighter fully taking off as a potent symbol of the Indian defence industry – a strange interference by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) itself and a painful obsession of the air force to diversify its fleet even further with a new, foreign origin single-engine fighter.

For a development programme that was sanctioned in 1983, the light fighter has come a long way. After limping its way through the 2000s, the single-engine jet has shown promise of late, maybe not as a cutting edge, globally competitive fighter but certainly as a platform that will enhance India’s combat capabilities within the region.

The desi fighter project is also one of the few things that the UPA and BJP governments have had a similar view on — the defence ministry under both regimes, driven by the person at the top, has been generous to overrule objections of the air force to give the Tejas time to mature.

A running battle between the air force, which insisted that the fighter is not good enough, and the defence ministry — batting for a homegrown jet to be accepted — came to head in 2015. Peace was brokered by then defence minister Manohar Parrikar on four simple terms.

That the air force would place orders for five squadrons of the fighter jet provided that four parameters are met — a world-class Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar to track targets, a long-range beyond visual range missile, air-to-air refuelling capability to enhance range and modern electronic warfare capability for survivability of the aircraft.
The deal was simple — meet these four requirements and the air force would have no choice but to place orders, giving the jet a fighting chance of proving its combat capability.

While progress has been made at various levels on integrating these four enhancements, DRDO itself, which has been deeply involved in the project, has come as a possible hindrance. Scientists have placed on record strong protests over efforts by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) to purchase new radars and electronic warfare systems from the global market. The logic? That these systems can be developed in India if the funds are allocated.

Given the tight timeline in which they need to be integrated and proven on board the Tejas — by 2020 — the best case scenario is to purchase the radars and systems from the global market and replace them subsequently with a homegrown solution when it matures.

However, with DRDO’s objections on record, it would take a strong stand by the defence ministry to do the right thing and honour the deal brokered in 2015. The question to be answered is whether the defence ministry is willing to bite the bullet to get the LCA truly off the ground.

The other challenge for this true ‘Make in India’ programme is the new-found foreign origin single-engine fighter jet obsession of the air force. The air force wants to buy several new fighter jets in the coming years.

The Rafale order has already been placed with a possibility of many more, a fifth generation fighter from Russia is on the cards but to further make up for numbers, the air force has moved a proposal for 118 new fighters — to be assembled in India. By specifying that it only wants jets with a single engine, only two jets in the world meet this requirement — the American F-16 and the Swedish Gripen.

By going with this ‘single engine’ formula, the air force is, in fact, contradicting itself. Years ago, when it started the now infamous Medium Multirole Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) competition, it was specified that the capabilities of a fighter would be judged — speed, range, weapon delivery, survivability etc — and not the number of engines it is equipped with. This gave way to the selection of the Eurofigher and Rafale as technically compatible fighters to Indian requirements, rejecting both the F-16 and the Gripen.

The fact is that a third single-engine fighter jet choice is now available for India — an improved, spruced up LCA that will be the precursor to a full range of homegrown combat aircraft.

And this might well be the most viable option.
The desi LCA is defence ministry’s low-hanging fruit and it needs to be plucked now
 

Abingdonboy

Team StratFront
Dec 1, 2017
154
388
UK
pointing to how - just like the ALH has led to LCH, LUH and now the push towards IMRH - the LCA could lead to other "specialized" "role oriented" fixed wing combat systems?
Only natural there will be multiple spin offs. Already there is the NLCA which was never meant to be created going by original plans.

The ecosystem that is being created for LCA is unimaginably useful for future aerospace projects. You literally cannot buy this kind of expertise.