Kalvari Class Submarines - Updates & Discussions

bille ka vut

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Jun 18, 2020
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did u guys see his video about scorpene's on youtube? he is claiming that a total of 24 scorpene's will be build and thinks the foxtrots havent been retired yet.
 

Ashwin

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did u guys see his video about scorpene's on youtube? he is claiming that a total of 24 scorpene's will be build and thinks the foxtrots havent been retired yet.
He is correct 24 SSKs to be built in 30 years was the plan from 90's. Now its cut to 18 to make way for the new SSN class. Project 75I will be the next six. I don't think he meant all are to be scorpene.
 

bille ka vut

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Jun 18, 2020
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He is correct 24 SSKs to be built in 30 years was the plan from 90's. Now its cut to 18 to make way for the new SSN class. Project 75I will be the next six. I don't think he meant all are to be scorpene.
Check the comment sections of the vid at the bottom he clearly thinks the planbis for 24 scorpenes.
24 is still the total of of planned ssk's if im not wrong.6 scorpenes+6p75i+12subs of indigenous design=24 subs.
 

Ankit Kumar

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Nov 30, 2017
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Check the comment sections of the vid at the bottom he clearly thinks the planbis for 24 scorpenes.
24 is still the total of of planned ssk's if im not wrong.6 scorpenes+6p75i+12subs of indigenous design=24 subs.
18 SSK and 6 SSN is the projected requirement as of now.
 

Ashwin

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Check the comment sections of the vid at the bottom he clearly thinks the planbis for 24 scorpenes.
24 is still the total of of planned ssk's if im not wrong.6 scorpenes+6p75i+12subs of indigenous design=24 subs.
No, its amendment to 18. Read indian sources.
 

_Anonymous_

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Dec 4, 2017
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Dude seriously all the IN foxtrots have been retired way back.some are preserved as museums AFAIK.or was it sarcasm?
The last of the Foxtrots - the improved ones known as the Vela class was retired from 2000 onwards ( 2010 to be precise) . He's technically right in that the Scorpenes are a replacement for them. The Kilo class & the HDWs are still operational with us. So what as per you are the Scorpenes replacing then?
 

bille ka vut

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Jun 18, 2020
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The last of the Foxtrots - the improved ones known as the Vela class was retired from 2000 onwards ( 2010 to be precise) . He's technically right in that the Scorpenes are a replacement for them. The Kilo class & the HDWs are still operational with us. So what as per you are the Scorpenes replacing then?
I've never said that scorpenes arnt foxtrots replacement but that they've been retired long back which mr jiv got wrong in his vid
 

Ankit Kumar

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Nov 30, 2017
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There must be some misunderstanding here because i havent heard of any amendment. Let me be clear 6 existing scorpenes+6p75i+12 indigenous ssk's have they changed these numbers?

No worries
The indigenous ssk part has been replaced by SSN project. And 18 SSKs to be procured between P75 and p75i
 

RISING SUN

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Dec 3, 2017
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AIP Submarines Will Increase The Lethality Of The Indian Navy
Unlike its potential adversaries China and Pakistan, India has yet to adopt Air Independent Power (AIP) for its submarines. Also known as Air Independent Propulsion, this technology allows a non-nuclear submarine to operate for longer without having to surface. This makes it harder to detect and allows it to patrol in high-risk areas for longer.

But AIP is coming to Indian submarines. The current Kalvari class boats are expected to receive an Indian-made system. This should greatly increase the potency of India’s non-nuclear submarines.

Indian engineers have been working on an indigenous AIP system. Engineering firm Larsen & Toubro has built and tested a prototype system that fits inside the Kalvari’s hull. The company is also involved in India’s indigenous nuclear-powered submarine.

According to people familiar with the situation, the plan is for each of the Kalvari class submarines to be retrofitted with the indigenous AIP. This should happen six to seven years after commissioning. It would be mounted in a hull extension that is inserted between the crew area and the engine space. The locally designed system is expected to extend the endurance of the submarines by two weeks.

India will operate six of the Kalvari class, which are the newest non-nuclear submarines in the Indian fleet. They are a version of the French-designed Scorpène type submarines. In the French lineage these are a generation newer than the Agosta Class boats in service with neighboring Pakistan.

Some of Pakistan’s Agostas already have AIP, which for the moment may confer some advantages to them. Unlike the Indian subs, which will use fuel cells, the Pakistan Navy submarines use the MESMA (Module d'Energie Sous-Marine Autonome) system. This burns ethanol with stored oxygen to produce steam, which turns a turbine similar to a nuclear power plant.

Pakistan is buying eight Type 093B submarines from China that will come with another type of AIP called a Stirling generator, which uses a closed-cycle diesel engine. These are essentially the same as China’s own AIP submarines, 17 of which are believed to be in service. The Stirling generator is famous because of the Swedish Navy's use, and it is also the type used by Japan.

Submarine warfare expert Aaron Amick, author of the Sub Brief podcast, believes that AIP will give the Indian Navy strategy advantages over the current non-nuclear submarines. He says that it will “force their closest rival, Pakistan, to be more vigilant over a wider area. Improving their Scorpene submarines with AIP will balance India with Pakistan’s new Type 093B Chinese subs that are due in 2023.”

In Amick’s view AIP is “essential in the 21st century, open water battle space. Submarines only get one chance to attack from stealth and AIP gives them the best opportunity for success.”

The Indian project will take years to put in place. For some time Pakistan’s AIP submarines will continue to out-number India’s. But the indigenous fuel cell technology will allow India to increase the usefulness of their conventional submarines. Add to this India’s nuclear-powered submarines and the Indian Navy should be able to retain a competitive edge. And India's next generation Project-75I boats will get AIP from the get-go.

The big unknown is whether China will establish an Indian Ocean submarine squadron. That could further complicate the picture.
 
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RISING SUN

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Indian Navy will get this powerful submarine, can wreak havoc inside the sea
New Delhi: INS Karanj, the third submarine of the Kalvari class being prepared in India, is expected to join the Navy in four to five months. Karanja was sent for sea tests in 2018 and according to sources these tests have been successful. The fourth submarine INS Vela of the same class will also join the Navy by the end of next year.

The first two submarines of the Kalvari class, Kalvari and Khanderi, have already been admitted to the Navy. A total of 6 submarines of Kalvari class are being prepared at Mazgaon Dock Limited, Mumbai. This submarine is capable of staying in the sea for 50 days and can travel up to 12000 km at a time. It has 8 officers and 35 naval operations and can dive up to 350 meters under the sea. The Kalmari class submarine has an undersea speed of 37 km per hour. These include torpedoes to destroy a submarine within the sea or a ship on the ocean surface. In addition, these submarines can also lay landmines in the sea.

Let us tell you that in 1997, the Indian Navy had prepared a big plan to make Submarine fleet powerful. Under this, there was a plan to construct new 24 submarines by 2024, but this plan is still running behind schedule. Kalvari joined the Navy in 2017 as the first submarine under the class ie Project 75. The project is expected to be completed by 2022.
 

Sathya

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Dec 2, 2017
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It really depends on what the left-over servive life is. If it's just 5 years or less, then the jets can come in really cheap. The MICAs are also due for upgrades. Best case is they simply give 'em away for peanuts, and then we upgrade and reequip them for $1-2B.

But I'd still go for Rafale instead.

They were looking for subs.. Scorpene.
We can trade a couple, keep Mazagon dock occupied ..
 

Lolwa

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Feb 6, 2020
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They were looking for subs.. Scorpene.
We can trade a couple, keep Mazagon dock occupied ..
No need for that. The Taiwanese mirage are in a decent condition though they have been the main fighter for the ROCAF they are the latest standard 2000-5 with rdy2 so similar to our 2000I not that expensive. Only thing we need to do is add a2g mode and refuelling probes and we are good to go. A single piece isn't cost more than 50mil$ optimistically. So we can buy around 40 for a billion$ or even cheaper. Our own mirage areo lder than the Taiwanese versions.
 
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randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
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India
They were looking for subs.. Scorpene.
We can trade a couple, keep Mazagon dock occupied ..

We barely even have subs for our own. Could have done so if we had a surplus, like the Kilo for Myanmar. But we can't afford to give away the Scorpene ourselves.
 

Sathya

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Dec 2, 2017
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We barely even have subs for our own. Could have done so if we had a surplus, like the Kilo for Myanmar. But we can't afford to give away the Scorpene ourselves.

No, I didn't mean to give away ours, with facilities available, we can make additional 2 or 3 , and L& T getting the next diesel sub contract.
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
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India
No, I didn't mean to give away ours, with facilities available, we can make additional 2 or 3 , and L& T getting the next diesel sub contract.

Ahh, that's a decision they have to make though. They plan to build 8 indigenous subs on their own though. Plan to get their first one in 2025, with construction starting next year.