Kalvari Class Submarines - Updates & Discussions

S

Seiko

The impending visit by French President Emmanuel Macron to India in early 2018 is likely to progress the possible sale of at least three additional DCNS Scorpene diesel-electric attack submarines (SSKs) to the Indian Navy (IN) to augment its declining underwater assets, official sources have told Jane’s.
Macron was scheduled to visit India for the first time in December to attend the International Solar Alliance (ISA) summit, which has been postponed to early 2018. The French president’s schedule is being mutually worked out and will be announced soon, officials said.
In India, Macron will meet with Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other officials that could include Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman.


http://www.janes.com/article/75884/...-advance-sales-pitch-for-additional-scorpenes
 

Ashwin

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After nearly two decades, the first Indian submarine Kalvari is to be commissioned in the Navy on December 14.

The first of the six Scorpene class submarines – to be named INS Kalvari is scheduled to be commissioned at Mazgaon dock, Mumbai. Prime Minister Narendra Modi would most probably be present at the commissioning, sources said.

The last conventional submarine commissioned in the Indian Navy was the Russian origin (EKM class) INS Sindhurashtra that was inducted in July 2000. Indian Navy currently operates 13 old diesel-electric submarines and one nuclear-powered boat.

In the 1980s and 1990s, there was regular induction of Russian and German submarines, but a two-decade-long hiatus crippled Indian Navy's underwater fighting abilities.

Way back in 1999, the Indian Navy planned to acquire 24 diesel electric submarines over the next 30 years.

The plan was modified twice later to incorporate nuclear-powered submarines and the deadlines were modified.

The targets set up in the 2008-22 indigenisation plan is way off the mark as Indian Navy currently operates 13 diesel electric and two nuclear-powered boats. Because of the delay, Navy has undertaken costly refit programmes to extend the life of the existing fleet.

To make up for the missing numbers, the government approved the Rs 18,798 crore Scorpene project to construct six conventional submarines in collaboration with France. The project is running four years behind schedule.

In September 2017, Mazgaon dock handed over the first Scorpene class submarine Kalvari (meaning tiger shark) to the Navy after successfully completing sea trial. The second one, Khanderi, was released in the sea for trial in January 2017 and is likely to be commissioned in the first quarter of 2018, while the third, Karanj, would be launched in water in December 2017, sources said.

Second tender

All the six submarines are to be inducted by 2019-20.

The defence ministry has floated a second tender proposal to construct another six submarines with foreign collaboration. Four vendors are known to have responded to the Indian proposal, but the government is yet to take a decision.

Meanwhile, China's submarine fleet has swollen to 63 and is likely to grow to 69-78 underwater boats by 2020, according to a report prepared by the US Department of Defence.

After 2 decades, Indian Navy to commission submarine Kalvari on Dec 14
 

Bon Plan

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Dec 1, 2017
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After nearly two decades, the first Indian submarine Kalvari is to be commissioned in the Navy on December 14.

The first of the six Scorpene class submarines – to be named INS Kalvari is scheduled to be commissioned at Mazgaon dock, Mumbai. Prime Minister Narendra Modi would most probably be present at the commissioning, sources said.

The last conventional submarine commissioned in the Indian Navy was the Russian origin (EKM class) INS Sindhurashtra that was inducted in July 2000. Indian Navy currently operates 13 old diesel-electric submarines and one nuclear-powered boat.

In the 1980s and 1990s, there was regular induction of Russian and German submarines, but a two-decade-long hiatus crippled Indian Navy's underwater fighting abilities.

Way back in 1999, the Indian Navy planned to acquire 24 diesel electric submarines over the next 30 years.

The plan was modified twice later to incorporate nuclear-powered submarines and the deadlines were modified.

The targets set up in the 2008-22 indigenisation plan is way off the mark as Indian Navy currently operates 13 diesel electric and two nuclear-powered boats. Because of the delay, Navy has undertaken costly refit programmes to extend the life of the existing fleet.

To make up for the missing numbers, the government approved the Rs 18,798 crore Scorpene project to construct six conventional submarines in collaboration with France. The project is running four years behind schedule.

In September 2017, Mazgaon dock handed over the first Scorpene class submarine Kalvari (meaning tiger shark) to the Navy after successfully completing sea trial. The second one, Khanderi, was released in the sea for trial in January 2017 and is likely to be commissioned in the first quarter of 2018, while the third, Karanj, would be launched in water in December 2017, sources said.

Second tender

All the six submarines are to be inducted by 2019-20.

The defence ministry has floated a second tender proposal to construct another six submarines with foreign collaboration. Four vendors are known to have responded to the Indian proposal, but the government is yet to take a decision.

Meanwhile, China's submarine fleet has swollen to 63 and is likely to grow to 69-78 underwater boats by 2020, according to a report prepared by the US Department of Defence.

After 2 decades, Indian Navy to commission submarine Kalvari on Dec 14
It's a very good day....
(my own birthday ;)).

And sorry Bro, I've made a mistake by reporting you. Really sorry. My mistake. :cry:
 

Abingdonboy

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Dec 1, 2017
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The impending visit by French President Emmanuel Macron to India in early 2018 is likely to progress the possible sale of at least three additional DCNS Scorpene diesel-electric attack submarines (SSKs) to the Indian Navy (IN) to augment its declining underwater assets, official sources have told Jane’s.
Macron was scheduled to visit India for the first time in December to attend the International Solar Alliance (ISA) summit, which has been postponed to early 2018. The French president’s schedule is being mutually worked out and will be announced soon, officials said.
In India, Macron will meet with Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other officials that could include Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman.


French president’s first visit to India likely to advance sales pitch for additional Scorpenes | Jane's 360
Deal needs to be closed ASAP to ensure the MDL production line doesn’t go idle.


There’s mammoth business pending with France though- more Rafales, C295Ws, A330s etc. Unlikely all will be progressed during this visit. Hope we can see at least one of them move towards completion, but all are vital in their respective areas.
 

Aashish

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Indian micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) currently have capabilities as tier-I/II suppliers to the submarine
platform, as can be evinced from the current P-75 Scorpene submarine program, wherein the major contributions include:

1512292832753.png
 

Ashwin

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After 17-year wait, India to get 1st conventional submarine, PM Modi to commission INS Kalvari next week

The Indian Navy will get her first conventional submarine in 17 years when Prime Minister Narendra Modi commissions the INS Kalvari in Mumbai on December 14.

The Kalvari's commissioning willo take place just six days after the Golden Jubilee of the navy's submarine arm on December 8, when President Ramnath Kovind will present the colours to the Navy's submarine arm at the Eastern Naval Command in Visakhapatnam.

Another highlight of the Kalvari's commissioning in Mumbai is that it will be done in the presence of 92-year-old Commander KS Subramanian. He was commanding officer of the first Indian submarine, also called the INS Kalvari.

Commodore Subramanian, now based in the US, commanded the Kalvari, the first of eight Foxtrot class submarines, when she was commissioned at the erstwhile Soviet Union's naval base Riga in Latvia on 8 December 1967.

The day is now known as Submarine Day. The Kalvari was decommissioned in 1996 after 29 years of service.

The new Kalvari is the first of six Scorpene class conventional diesel-electric submarines built at the Mazagon Docks Ltd under a $3 billion contract with DCNS (now Naval Group) of France.

Her induction was plagued by construction delays. The submarine was to enter service in 2013.

The Indian navy presently has a fleet of 13 ageing conventional submarines, a majority of which will need to be replaced within the next decade as they reach the end of their 30-year service lives.

The commisioning of the Kalvari is the longest gap between acquistions of these underwater platforms.

The acquisition of all six Kalvari-class submarines by 2021 will give the navy's submarine arm a much needed boost.

After 17-year wait, India to get 1st conventional submarine, PM Modi to commission INS Kalvari next week
 

Antiguy

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Dec 6, 2017
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Naval group 2nd generation fuel cell is ready as well. The same AIP which i had said about 1.5 years back as possible candidate for Scorpenes. In case our DRDO AIP fails to meet the requirement then we will be going for this AIP...

More on the new AIP here
Naval Group - Submarines: DCNS unveils fuel cell AIP

within 3 years of Modi coming to power everything is moving forward so quickly.
 
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ashkum2278

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Dec 4, 2017
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A LONG SAGA FROM KALVARI TO KALVARI

On December 8, 1967, when Commander K.S. Subramanian read out the commissioning warrant in freezing -15 degree Celsius at Vladivostok, submarine base in Russia then USSR, little did he know that he was heralding a force that would one day be a nuclear force and will complete the nuclear triad for the country. Cdr Subramanian commanded the first submarine of the Indian Navy INS Kalvari.



The submarine arm or the silent arm of the Indian Navy is celebrating its golden jubilee this year, and in the last five decades it has grown from a couple of Foxtrot class submarines to possess the Arihant class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) to the state-of-the-art Scorpene-class submarines.



The proposal to form a submarine arm was first envisaged in 1959 and a draft plan to acquire four submarines from UK at a cost of ₹16 crore with a recurring annual cost of ₹ 2 crore was moved. But it did not materialise, and it was again moved in 1962 and the government approved the proposal. A nine- member team led by Captain B.K. Dang was sent to UK to undergo training at HMS Dolphin. But the purchase proposal did not again materialise, as India wanted to buy the Porpoise or Oberon class and the British government offered the old ‘T’ class.



It was only in 1964 that the Soviet government agreed for transfer by purchase for four ‘F’ class or Foxtrot-class submarines.



About 16 officers and over 100 sailors received training at Vladivostok and a beginning was made when Cdr. K.S. Subramanian sailed into the Visakhapatnam harbour, braving 16,000 km of rough sea from Riga to Visakhapatnam, on June 6, 1968.



The submarine arm of the Indian Navy came into operation at Visakhapatnam with the then Chief of Naval Staff Admiral A.K. Chatterjee laying the foundation stone for the submarine base.



The silent arm grew with the induction of four more Foxtrot-class submarines such as INS Khanderi, Karanj and Kursura. All the four constituted the 8th Submarine Squadron and have played a key role during the 1970-71 Indo-Pak war. Today, all have been decommissioned and INS Kursura is transformed into a submarine museum and stands on Visakhapatnam beach.



The first full-fledged submarine base had come into existence in the shape of INS Virbahu on May 19, 1971 at Visakhapatnam.



The force grew with the acquisition of four more Foxtrot-class submarines from the then Soviet Union. INS Vela, Vagir, Vagli and Vaghsheer formed the formidable 9th Squadron with the base at Bombay now Mumbai.



From the Foxtrot class, the navy graduated to procure and produce the German-based HDW 1500 class or also called as the SSKs attack submarines, in mid 1980s. Referred to as the Shishumar class, four of them Shishumar, Shankush, Shalki and Shankul formed the 10th Squadron of the arm, based in Mumbai.



Keeping the tempo up, India negotiated with Russia to procure the Kilo-class or the Sindhughosh-class attack submarines. Equipped with the 3M-54 Klub (SS-N-27) anti-ship cruise missiles with a range of 220 km, for the first time India was on the offensive side of submarine warfare.



While Sindhughosh, Sindhudhvaj, Sindhuraj, Sindhuvir , Sindhuratna and Sindhurakshak (exploded and sank in Mumbai harbour on 14 August 2013) were based in Mumbai to form the 12th Squadron. Sindhukesari, Sindhukriti, Sindhuvijay and Sindhurashtra were based in Visakhapatnam to form the 11th Squadron.



Nuclear Era



The submarine arm entering the nuclear era began with the leasing of INS Chakra an Akula-class nuclear-powered attack submarine (SSN) from Russia in 1988 and it was based in Visakhapatnam.



Sources in the navy said Chakra was taken on lease to train officers and men with the futuristic idea to build its own nuclear fleet. After the lease of INS Chakra expired, a second Akula Class nuclear submarine INS Chakra II was taken on lease from Russia in 2012.



India built its first nuclear submarine INS Arihant under the Advanced Technology Vessel project at the Ship Building Centre in Visakhapatnam.



INS Arihant the first of the expected five in the Arihant-class is indigenously built with Akula-class technology.



Completing a full 50 years cycle, the Scorpène-class submarine is now being built for the Indian Navy at Mazagon Dock in Mumbai with French design, and they are named after the Kalvari class. The subs will be named after the first batch that served the navy such as Kalvari, Khanderi and Karanj.



Source>>
 

ni8mare

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Dec 7, 2017
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Ok while going through the IN 17 video some interesting thing I have noted. Some schematics of AIP+VLS submarine below:

One with AIP + VLS, other one without AIP but with VLS

1512825984856.png



Observe the LOX tanks...pointing towards AIP, also note the 4 VLS>>>>

1512825781230.png


At 3:58


So the question is whether IN is working on Indigenous AIP subs....
 
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T

Tarun

Submarines, vital component of blue water navy: ENC chief
Saturday, December 09, 2017
By: The Hindu


The Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Eastern Naval Command Vice Admiral Karambir Singh says submarines are the most potent instruments in any conflict and can be employed for several missions.

According to him, submarines can be deployed at extended ranges and their ability to fire weapons from a stand-off range without getting detected makes them a vital component of a blue water navy. Probably this vision of the navy has got the sanction of Project 75 I, Project 75 and ATV (Advanced Technology Vessel).

The sub-surface nuclear ballistic (SSBN) Arihant-class nuclear submarines being built under the Advanced Technology Vessel project at the Ship Building Centre in Visakhapatnam, will give India the cutting edge deterrence, said Commodore Uday Bhaskar, Defence Analyst. Arihant is capable of launching nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles from its vertical launch tubes and is undergoing extensive sea and weapons trial, the second in line INS Aridhaman is learnt to be nearing its launch time.

The nuclear subs unlike the conventional diesel ones can operate sub-surface for months without surfacing and can dive deep to about 500 mts to avoid detection.

Under Project 75, six Scorpene-class submarines in collaboration with French firm DCNS is being built at Mazagon. Christened as Kalvari-class these silent killers can carry 18 torpedoes and travel 1,020km underwater. The 66-metre submarine can dive up to a depth of 300 metres.

Project 75I-class is an extended version of Project 75 Kalvari-class submarine and under this project it is learnt that at least three subs with advanced feature of Air-independent propulsion (AIP) systems is being planned. This feature will give them the capability of longer sub-surface duration and enhanced operation range.

link: Submarines, vital component of blue water navy: ENC chief
 

Aashish

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Project 75I-class is an extended version of Project 75 Kalvari-class submarine and under this project it is learnt that at least three subs with advanced feature of Air-independent propulsion (AIP) systems is being planned. This feature will give them the capability of longer sub-surface duration and enhanced operation range.

great news
 

Ashwin

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Nice find. It could be some concept design. There is no reason to keep a SSK project classified.
 
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Sathya

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So P75i - proposed 6 subs under SP model gets converted to 3 scorpene with AIP,

I hope more than adequate measures are taken to upgrade the systems that might have compromised with previous data leaks ..
 

Aashish

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Naval Group Proud Of Its Strong Indian Footprint





New Delhi. 02 December 2017. “Naval Group always prefers to listen to the customer and be in line with the policies of India as has been put in place by competent authorities. As usual we will follow the guidance from the Indian Navy and MoD. And there may be synergies to be derived from public private partnerships,” says Bernard Buisson, MD, Naval Group in India, in an exclusive tete-e-tete with Aviation & Defence Universe (ADU).

ADU. Has the change of name from DCNS to The Naval Group affected the company’s popularity?

BB. In a world of profound changes, with the acceleration of innovation cycles and a growing competitive landscape in the military market, it is necessary for our group to assert its identity through the creation of a powerful brand.

This was the right time, after the success achieved in 2016 with our selection by Australia as its preferred international partner for the design and build of 12 future submarines, and the creation of our subsidiary in marine renewable energy. It only seemed natural to take advantage of the unprecedented level of visibility we achieved as a result of this to further raises our profile.

The new name ‘Naval Group’ clarifies both who we are and as well as our mission: help safeguard the sovereign interests of our customers at sea and make the most of our naval skills to support their energy transition. So in a way the identity is empowered with this name change.

ADU. Under the new Strategic Partnership policy has the Naval Group decided on a company it can partner with?

BB. Naval Group is in position to offer a submarine fully in line with Indian Navy’s expectation for enhanced capabilities. We understand the future submarines are to be procured as per SP guidelines and the submarines are to be built by the shipyard that will be chosen by Indian Government as strategic partner. In this process, our first action would be to answer to future requests from navy to Naval Group as OEM and then follow the guidelines of the SP model to answer to any shipyard that Indian Navy would like us to get associated with as per the process.

ADU. What is the stage of the P28 Corvette being made at GRSE with a major contribution by The Naval Group?

BB. GRSE has made fantastic progress in building and delivering of P28 ASW corvettes. For This project, Naval Group has delivered Raft Mounted Gear box with high stealth features. Three out of total four sets of such gearbox being built in India by Walchandnagar. It is a major achievement especially in the Float category of indigenous content expected by Indian Navy.

All the gearboxes have been delivered to GRSE who has also delivered to Indian Navy 3 out of 4 corvettes. Naval Group is working closely with GRSE to ensure the success of future sea trials of the fourth boat as well. Building upon this experience, Naval Group is now willing to cooperate with Indian companies like KPCL to propose new generation Naval Group Versatile Gearbox for future naval warships and platforms.


ADU.
What is the status of the Mistral LHD The Naval Group will manufacture along with Reliance?

BB. As you are already ware that, Naval Group has teamed up with Pipavav (now Reliance Defence and Engineering Ltd) for LPD program of Indian Navy. We have proposed to Pipavav a modified version of our Mistral type LPD in order to answer to Indian Navy’s requirements. Now we are waiting for commercial bids of Indian shipyards to be opened in this regard.

ADU. Have you heard from the Indian Navy on introducing the OTEC technology in India as a part of its Green Initiatives?

BB. We had performed pre-feasibility for Indian Navy and had provided report that an offshore OTEC plant is possible off the coast of Port Blair near Cinque Island. This proposal is understood to be under review at different ministries (MNRE) and Indian Navy. We will be always available should Indian Government decides to go ahead with this project for execution.

ADU.
In the overall context of recent pronouncements on ‘Make in India’ and Skill India where do you see yourself?

BB. Naval Group believes that significant skill, expertise, experience and knowledge have been absorbed by MDL during the building of Scorpene submarines over the last 10 years and this knowhow can be extended for future manufacture. Keeping this in mind, and having successfully achieved a unique first in class manufacturing of Kalvari class submarines in India, we are convinced that fast track manufacturing of future submarines can very well be executed by MDL with Naval Group as technology partner.

In addition to the fact of skilling MDL and our MSME partners, we would also like to highlight that some of our own trained Indian engineers from Mumbai started working in France, within Naval Group’s design department in Cherbourg. They are integrated with the French engineer’s team for the design of submarines. After few years, they will come back to India and can participate with the Navy and shipyards in the design of new submarines.We believe this is true essence of Skill India especially for stringent submarine building industry.

ADU. Have you got Indian MSMEs in the ecosystem for your ship building and do you find them capable of such high technology production?

BB. With MDL and the guidance of Indian Navy, Naval Group in India has implemented an Indigenous Program around P75. Through this program, qualification and TOT for equipment has been transferred to Indian companies to create an Ecosystem of MSMEs for manufacturing of mechanical and electrical supplies.We are working with a range of MSMEs like SEC, Flash Forge, HBL and many more under this program. This has enabled equipment to be locally manufactured in the categories of Float (Hulls, Hatches, Ballast Valves), Move (Steering Consoles) and Fight (Weapon Handling). Naval Group is so satisfied with the quality standard adhered to that they have taken a step further and outsourced procurement of certain equipment for the French Navy’s latest submarines (under construction) to these Indian MSMEs. These achievements cumulatively empower the indigenous submarine building capacities of India and will mark 2017 as the year of submarines in line with Golden Jubilee of Indian Navy’s Submarine Arm.

ADU. Have you decided on the torpedoes for the Indian submarines?

BB. As far as the new requirement of heavy weight torpedo required by Indian Navy, Naval Group has presented the capabilities and performances of the F-21 heavy weight torpedo. This torpedo has been developed for the French Navy’s new generation of SSN class submarine Barracuda. With highest safety features, advanced speed and performance. F-21 is a much more lethal weapon than other available torpedoes, which mostly use old generation Silver Zinc for their battery technology.

More than 100 F-21 torpedoes have been ordered so far to be integrated on to the French Navy’s Rubis and Barracuda class submarines, and also for the Brazilian Scorpene submarines. It is seamlessly integrated in Scorpene class submarine’s Subtics Combat Management System.

In India, our industrial partners, MSMEs, as well as DRDO laboratories are being consulted to enlarge future possibility of indigenous content for this modern torpedo.

ADU. What is the status of construction of the submarines at MDL?

BB. The first Scorpene, christened ‘INS Kalvari’, set afloat last year, has completed all its sea trials and was delivered in September 2017 is now awaiting its commissioning in a few weeks. It is an incredible success story of Make in India submarine – more so after it attained combat readiness, having fired the anti-ship missiles and torpedo.

The second in the series called ‘Khanderi’ was launched beginning this year and has also commenced its sea trials.

ADU. How near are you to getting the Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) technology for submarines to India?

BB. AIP is a strong requirement of the Indian Navy. Its development in India is in line with Naval Group’s objective to continuously increase the indigenous content of the P75 submarines. Naval Group has always been supportive of the indigenous DRDO AIP being developed at NMRL.

We are indeed keen to have the DRDO AIP integrated in the P75 submarines sooner or later. Naval Group is advising NMRL on the safety requirement so that they can adapt their technology accordingly. Also, as the designer of the Scorpene submarine, we have been requested by the DRDO to study the functional and physical integration of DRDO AIP into the Scorpene submarine. Integrating DRDO AIP technology will require increasing the hull by several meters. This will be achieved by adding a hull section (plug-in) that will accommodate the specific AIP equipment and all other systems, equipment and components which are required to interface with the rest of the ship.

ADU. What are your plans for The Naval Group apart from P75 in India?

BB. India remains at the heart of Naval Group’s global strategy. The Make in India initiative has paved way to a positive atmosphere to be accompanied by simpler decision making processes. Hopefully, the new DPP will contribute to a more efficient and faster decision process. Today Naval Group is in discussion with the Indian Navy, for a number of future programs which include service support to Indian Navy for maintenance of P75 submarines, future submarine projects, future heavy weight torpedo and anti-torpedo projects, LPD project and the future indigenised aircraft carrier, amongst others. Naval Group believes that indigenisation and sustainable industrial ecosystem in India is the key to long term success for Indian defence industry. This caters to a win-win situation for both, Naval Group and India as a nation. Naval Group is also proposing advanced simulators for submarine applications to Indian Navy. Such simulators are being proposed with high indigenous content and in partnership with Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL) which is not only a key shipbuilder but also centre of excellence for simulators.

Link - Naval Group proud of its strong Indian footprint | ADU

Important parts

ADU. What is the status of the Mistral LHD The Naval Group will manufacture along with Reliance?

BB. As you are already ware that, Naval Group has teamed up with Pipavav (now Reliance Defence and Engineering Ltd) for LPD program of Indian Navy. We have proposed to Pipavav a modified version of our Mistral type LPD in order to answer to Indian Navy’s requirements. Now we are waiting for commercial bids of Indian shipyards to be opened in this regard.

ADU. Have you decided on the torpedoes for the Indian submarines?

BB. As far as the new requirement of heavy weight torpedo required by Indian Navy, Naval Group has presented the capabilities and performances of the F-21 heavy weight torpedo. This torpedo has been developed for the French Navy’s new generation of SSN class submarine Barracuda. With highest safety features, advanced speed and performance. F-21 is a much more lethal weapon than other available torpedoes, which mostly use old generation Silver Zinc for their battery technology.

More than 100 F-21 torpedoes have been ordered so far to be integrated on to the French Navy’s Rubis and Barracuda class submarines, and also for the Brazilian Scorpene submarines. It is seamlessly integrated in Scorpene class submarine’s Subtics Combat Management System.

In India, our industrial partners, MSMEs, as well as DRDO laboratories are being consulted to enlarge future possibility of indigenous content for this modern torpedo.


Very Important Line

In India, our industrial partners, MSMEs, as well as DRDO laboratories are being consulted to enlarge future possibility of indigenous content for this modern torpedo.

Today Naval Group is in discussion with the Indian Navy, for a number of future programs which include service support to Indian Navy for maintenance of P75 submarines, future submarine projects, future heavy weight torpedo and anti-torpedo projects, LPD project and the future indigenised aircraft carrier, amongst others

Naval Group is also proposing advanced simulators for submarine applications to Indian Navy. Such simulators are being proposed with high indigenous content and in partnership with Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL) which is not only a key shipbuilder but also centre of excellence for simulators.

@Ashwin @Abingdonboy @Tarun @randomradio @Parthu @vstol Jockey @Picdelamirand-oil @ni8mare @GuardianRED

Official confirmation of what we all said for years.. Naval group participation on our ACC projects and Torpedo F21 coming soon or its indianised version.

P75I looks like a enlarged Scorpene submarine with AIP and borrowing sub system from Barracuda/shortfin..
 

GuardianRED

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Dec 2, 2017
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Link - Naval Group proud of its strong Indian footprint | ADU

Important parts






Very Important Line

In India, our industrial partners, MSMEs, as well as DRDO laboratories are being consulted to enlarge future possibility of indigenous content for this modern torpedo.

Today Naval Group is in discussion with the Indian Navy, for a number of future programs which include service support to Indian Navy for maintenance of P75 submarines, future submarine projects, future heavy weight torpedo and anti-torpedo projects, LPD project and the future indigenised aircraft carrier, amongst others

Naval Group is also proposing advanced simulators for submarine applications to Indian Navy. Such simulators are being proposed with high indigenous content and in partnership with Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL) which is not only a key shipbuilder but also centre of excellence for simulators.

@Ashwin @Abingdonboy @Tarun @randomradio @Parthu @vstol Jockey @Picdelamirand-oil @ni8mare @GuardianRED

Official confirmation of what we all said for years.. Naval group participation on our ACC projects and Torpedo F21 coming soon or its indianised version.

P75I looks like a enlarged Scorpene submarine with AIP and borrowing sub system from Barracuda/shortfin..
The only question is ... Whats the Timeline are we looking at ? atleast for the F21 ie when can see the test, procurement and induction?
 
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