MMRCA 2.0 - Updates and Discussions

What is your favorite for MMRCA 2.0 ?

  • JSF F-35 Blk 4

    Votes: 20 12.7%
  • Rafale F4

    Votes: 124 78.5%
  • Eurofighter Typhoon T3

    Votes: 3 1.9%
  • Gripen E/F

    Votes: 3 1.9%
  • F-16 B70

    Votes: 1 0.6%
  • SH F-18

    Votes: 7 4.4%

  • Total voters
    158

_Anonymous_

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My estimate is MMRCA will be signed either in 2023 or 2025. I'm leaning on the latter date.

90 jet deal is dead. That's why there's MMRCA 2.0.
What if the GoI continue to procure the Rafales in batches without the MMRCA relying on the OEMs for offsets without any MII clause & the MMRCA -2 is merely a risk mitigation scheme should the development of the MWF be delayed. In any case by 2023-24 we'd now exactly how much time would be needed for the MWF to attain FOC & enter production.
 

Lolwa

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after F16, F21, SH18, now F15 !
Next step will be F22 ?

:LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO:

Typhoon has no AESA radar so far. Only mock up. Only technological developpment. Nothing operationnal YET.
Maybe next year. Or 2022, or....
Well whatever aesa the eurogroup was claiming has more range than the rafale. And is expected to be on par with fifth gen fighter radars. The pesa captor had a huge range and the mk 1 aesa radar of the eurofighter is said to be on par when it comes to range along with the advantages of aesa. The qataris are already getting them as well as the Brits who have paid bae for some different aesa . Then you have Germans and the rest wanting a different aesa. The eurofighter program is a clusterfuck but at its present stage it does have superior engine and maybe radar to the rafale apart from that it's a failure.
 

Lolwa

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Rafale's AESA radar is better, especially the one coming up for F4.2.



Rafale and Typhoon engines are better.



The external load is pointless actually. IAF is not interested in that much, there are other more important factors. They are not interested in speed either, agility is more important. What IAF is looking for is lower servicibility requirements and higher availability, which heavier jets will not provide.



Rafale and Typhoon have lower RCS. And Rafale's RCS is further lowered electronically.



Yep, it is in the same category as the Su-30. And the upgraded Su-30 will bring it on par anyway. So it's gonna be a pointless purchase. That's why neither Su-35 nor F-15 have any chance.
‘Tel Aviv completes Spike missiles supply to New Delhi’

ANI, Feb 05 2020.
View attachment 13918

Israel completed the supply of the Spike Long Range (LR) Anti Tank guided missiles (AGTM) to India within three months of the order, Israel’s Rafael Advanced Defense Systems’ India Head, Eli Hefets, said on Wednesday. India had placed an order for the missiles post-Balakot operations to strengthen its capabilities vis-a-vis Pakistan and has also started deploying them on the line of Control with Pakistan.

“We have completed the supply of the Spike-LR anti-tank guided missiles under the fast track procedure where the systems had to be delivered within three months of the order,” Eli Hefets, India Head of Israel’s Rafael Advanced Defense Systems, told ANI. Over 200 of the Spike missiles and their launchers have been procured from Israel by the Indian Army to meet its emergency requirements. The missiles which are supposed to be mainly used for anti-tank operations can also be used for destroying hardened shelters or bunkers which may be hiding terrorists.

Spike LR ATGM system is a man-portable 4th Generation system which can engage targets in both FireForget and Fire, Observe and Update mode, thus enhancing the operational flexibility and crew survivability.

Israel, Germany, Spain are among the other users of the 4th Generation Spike LR ATGM system. As per available inputs in open source, China has developed a 3rd Generation ATGM System while Pakistan does not have such a capability yet.

The Spike missiles were acquired by the Indian Army through the emergency procurement route after the Balakot aerial strikes against the Pakistan-based terrorist groups.

The missiles from Israel have been procured as a stop-gap arrangement till the time the DRDO-developed Man-Portable Anti Tank Guided Mis


Rafale and Typhoon engines are better.



The external load is pointless actually. IAF is not interested in that much, there are other more important factors. They are not interested in speed either, agility is more important. What IAF is looking for is lower servicibility requirements and higher availability, which heavier jets will not provide.



Rafale and Typhoon have lower RCS. And Rafale's RCS is further lowered electronically.



Yep, it is in the same category as the Su-30. And the upgraded Su-30 will bring it on par anyway. So it's gonna be a pointless purchase. That's why neither Su-35 nor F-15 have any chance.
While the 36 F-15s cost $12B, the Qataris paid about $8.3B for 36 Rafales. Furthermore, Qatar signed another deal for 1.1B in order to support the F-15s. So you already know that the F-15 is more expensive than the Rafale/Typhoon, so that's the end of the road for it right there. Qatar bought 24 Typhoons for $7.7B.

The good news is, this allows the IAF to shortlist another fighter jet that is more expensive than the Rafale apart from the Typhoon.
[/quote]

While the 36 F-15s cost $12B, the Qataris paid about $8.3B for 36 Rafales. Furthermore, Qatar signed another deal for 1.1B in order to support the F-15s. So you already know that the F-15 is more expensive than the Rafale/Typhoon, so that's the end of the road for it right there. Qatar bought 24 Typhoons for $7.7B.

The good news is, this allows the IAF to shortlist another fighter jet that is more expensive than the Rafale apart from the Typhoon.[/QUOTE]


Well the rafales are not getting any new aesa till f6 version if I'm not wrong and the apg 82 is way more powerful. From what I've read the rbe 2 aesa is weaker to other contemporary aesa radars when it comes to range so how is it better than apg 82 which is more powerful and more range than the rbe 2 aesa .

The F 15 engine technology is definitely older compared to the ej200 and m88 but it's still more powerful than both of them . And engine technology of Americans has generally been superior to every other country. So technology wise it's no way inferior to the rafale or typhoon. The only place where it is at a disadvantage is no meteor integration and mediocre agility.
 

randomradio

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What if the GoI continue to procure the Rafales in batches without the MMRCA relying on the OEMs for offsets without any MII clause & the MMRCA -2 is merely a risk mitigation scheme should the development of the MWF be delayed. In any case by 2023-24 we'd now exactly how much time would be needed for the MWF to attain FOC & enter production.
The only one with an advantage in this case would be Dassault. This is their best case, no MII, no offsets, only small deals spread over a long period of time. IAF will get their jets, but it will become difficult to maintain the jet or build spares if there is no expertise for it. Then we have to pay a lot more just to build expertise. Even the GCC doesn't sign such deals, although they do come pretty close.

Anyway, MMRCA is more important than MWF.
Well whatever aesa the eurogroup was claiming has more range than the rafale. And is expected to be on par with fifth gen fighter radars. The pesa captor had a huge range and the mk 1 aesa radar of the eurofighter is said to be on par when it comes to range along with the advantages of aesa. The qataris are already getting them as well as the Brits who have paid bae for some different aesa . Then you have Germans and the rest wanting a different aesa. The eurofighter program is a clusterfuck but at its present stage it does have superior engine and maybe radar to the rafale apart from that it's a failure.
The EF AESA radar is completely unknown and will most definitely be inferior to what's coming out of France for F4.
 

_Anonymous_

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The only one with an advantage in this case would be Dassault. This is their best case, no MII, no offsets, only small deals spread over a long period of time. IAF will get their jets, but it will become difficult to maintain the jet or build spares if there is no expertise for it. Then we have to pay a lot more just to build expertise. Even the GCC doesn't sign such deals, although they do come pretty close.

Anyway, MMRCA is more important than MWF.
I clearly mentioned no MII but yes to offsets. Add MRO by DRAL at MIHAN Nagpur. I don't see why should building up spares & expertise in maintenance be such a major task.
 
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You are referring to small differences though. Based on what Dassault itself has advertised for the CAP role, Rafale has a radius of 920Nm and SH has a radius of 800Nm. That's a difference of just 120Nm.

Granted, in order to meet Rafale's standards with 3 drop tanks, SH will need 2 CFTs as well as 3 drop tanks. So Rafale is more fuel efficient and SH's fuel fraction is not impressive. But SH can meet Rafale's standards anyway, due to the use of 2 additional CFTs. Overall, the combat radius for CAP is more or less the same. Do note that I'm not considering Rafale's CFTs since it's not operational.


My estimate is MMRCA will be signed either in 2023 or 2025. I'm leaning on the latter date.

90 jet deal is dead. That's why there's MMRCA 2.0.
You didn't read carrefully my post :
Dassault used official data from F-18 SH to fight Gripen and official data is that F-18 SH have an improved range by 40 % compare to F 18C but in reality improved range is marginal so you have to minore the official data by 30% and then the real range of F 18 SH is 560 Nm instead of 800 which explain that it is only 390 for the CAP with two external Tanks.
In the same configuration Rafale will have 390*900/560= 630 Nm
 

randomradio

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Well the rafales are not getting any new aesa till f6 version if I'm not wrong and the apg 82 is way more powerful. From what I've read the rbe 2 aesa is weaker to other contemporary aesa radars when it comes to range so how is it better than apg 82 which is more powerful and more range than the rbe 2 aesa .
The RBE-2 managed to do 130Km against a 3m2 target and Thales claims to have doubled that with AESA. If you take that claim at face value, then the RBE-2AA can detect a target at 260Km against a 3m2 target. The F-22's APG-77 is said to do the same. I won't be surprised if the APG-82 does as much or more than that.

However the Rafale is set to get a new radar for the F4 program, and I don't think anybody else in the West will match it, save for the next radar coming up for the F-22.

The F 15 engine technology is definitely older compared to the ej200 and m88 but it's still more powerful than both of them . And engine technology of Americans has generally been superior to every other country. So technology wise it's no way inferior to the rafale or typhoon. The only place where it is at a disadvantage is no meteor integration and mediocre agility.
No point talking about the engine, we won't be getting the tech for it.
I clearly mentioned no MII but yes to offsets. Add MRO by DRAL at MIHAN Nagpur. I don't see why should building up spares & expertise in maintenance be such a major task.
If offsets are added, then it makes sense for Dassault to commit to MII in India. MRO also can come in through offsets.
 

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You didn't read carrefully my post :
Dassault used official data from F-18 SH to fight Gripen and official data is that F-18 SH have an improved range by 40 % compare to F 18C but in reality improved range is marginal so you have to minore the official data by 30% and then the real range of F 18 SH is 560 Nm instead of 800 which explain that it is only 390 for the CAP with two external Tanks.
In the same configuration Rafale will have 390*900/560= 630 Nm
I suppose Dassault did overestimate SH's range.

Boeing claims the combat radius of SH will be 700Nm with the CFTs, an addition of 130Nm, which means SH on internal fuel plus center line tank should be 570Nm.

Boeing Advanced Super Hornet Demonstrates Significant Stealth, Range Improvements
The tests also showed that the CFTs increase the jet’s combat radius by up to 130 nautical miles, for a total combat radius of more than 700 nautical miles.

I recall there was a presentation image from Boeing about this, with configuration. Gotta check.
 

randomradio

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You didn't read carrefully my post :
Dassault used official data from F-18 SH to fight Gripen and official data is that F-18 SH have an improved range by 40 % compare to F 18C but in reality improved range is marginal so you have to minore the official data by 30% and then the real range of F 18 SH is 560 Nm instead of 800 which explain that it is only 390 for the CAP with two external Tanks.
In the same configuration Rafale will have 390*900/560= 630 Nm
Here:


 

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Well whatever aesa the eurogroup was claiming has more range than the rafale. And is expected to be on par with fifth gen fighter radars.
Yeah, claims and expectations is all they can produce.

The pesa captor had a huge range
No such thing exist. CAPTOR is mechanically scanned.

and the mk 1 aesa radar of the eurofighter is said to be on par when it comes to range along with the advantages of aesa. The qataris are already getting them as well as the Brits who have paid bae for some different aesa . Then you have Germans and the rest wanting a different aesa. The eurofighter program is a clusterfuck but at its present stage it does have superior engine and maybe radar to the rafale apart from that it's a failure.
There is one important thing to consider here, and it's that electronic radars are defined by their software at least as much, if not more, than their raw power. Sure, you can take a look at the power transmission capacity of a T/R module, multiply by the number of modules, and get some sort of value that you can use to extrapolate maximum range for an object of diameter x according to the radar equation... But that's all far too abstract to work actually like this. It's the whole spherical cow issue.

It's the software that really makes the difference between radars now. It's software that you rely upon to sort the faint but real returns from the ambient electromagnetic noise. It's software that makes your radar beams LPI. It's software that can thwart the LPI of other radars (after all, just like "low observability" is not "total invisibility", "low probability of intercept" isn't "total uninterceptability"). It's software that can "cheat" at physics using pulse compression and other such tricks. And it's also software that lets you use your radar as something more than just a radar, but a multipurpose radio antenna that can also do broadband communications or electronic warfare.

And the RBE2 has for it a big advantage since it has had two decades to test, refine and perfect its software; whereas the CAPTOR-E is, quite literally, struggling to get off the ground, because they've made models of the thing but they haven't managed to get it working yet, so it's never been tested in flight yet.
 

Lolwa

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The only one with an advantage in this case would be Dassault. This is their best case, no MII, no offsets, only small deals spread over a long period of time. IAF will get their jets, but it will become difficult to maintain the jet or build spares if there is no expertise for it. Then we have to pay a lot more just to build expertise. Even the GCC doesn't sign such deals, although they do come pretty close.

Anyway, MMRCA is more important than MWF.


The EF AESA radar is completely unknown and will most definitely be inferior to what's coming out of France for F4.
There is no radar upgrade in F4 standard . Could link me some news related to it becuase I can't find any. As per as dassault road map f4 and f5 will have software improvments and upgrade in Spectra ew library. It's the f6 which will get the GaN (most probably) radar.
CAESOR radar is for a long time on their plan with Leonardo developing it. And they will be using the Raven ES 05 as there base from what I've read.
Now at present because the Germans are retarded they didn't want to invest in aesa while the Brits wanted an aesa. Which resulted in seperate radar development. BAE has got the contract to upgrade the British typhoons to tranche 3a standard with aesa which will be different to the rest of the euro typhoons. Now the qataris will get aesa on their typhoons the question is whose aesa will it be bae 's or Leonardo's. And the aesa for the Brits has both modes a2a a2g while the German version doesn't(I know Leonardo is italian).
 

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Yeah, claims and expectations is all they can produce.


No such thing exist. CAPTOR is mechanically scanned.



There is one important thing to consider here, and it's that electronic radars are defined by their software at least as much, if not more, than their raw power. Sure, you can take a look at the power transmission capacity of a T/R module, multiply by the number of modules, and get some sort of value that you can use to extrapolate maximum range for an object of diameter x according to the radar equation... But that's all far too abstract to work actually like this. It's the whole spherical cow issue.

It's the software that really makes the difference between radars now. It's software that you rely upon to sort the faint but real returns from the ambient electromagnetic noise. It's software that makes your radar beams LPI. It's software that can thwart the LPI of other radars (after all, just like "low observability" is not "total invisibility", "low probability of intercept" isn't "total uninterceptability"). It's software that can "cheat" at physics using pulse compression and other such tricks. And it's also software that lets you use your radar as something more than just a radar, but a multipurpose radio antenna that can also do broadband communications or electronic warfare.

And the RBE2 has for it a big advantage since it has had two decades to test, refine and perfect its software; whereas the CAPTOR-E is, quite literally, struggling to get off the ground, because they've made models of the thing but they haven't managed to get it working yet, so it's never been tested in flight yet.
Software has a limit you can't boost raw performance with software. It's like saying I'm going to download a graphics card to play games on my PC.
CAPTOR has superior range still and is one of the most powerful radars when it comes to range and to be serious rbe 2 aesa is a good radar but far from being powerful. The radome can't fit that many trm modules compared to the typhoon.You can fanboy rafale if you want but it's afact . Even apg 80 of f16 and apg79 is said to be superior in range compared to rbe 2 aesa.
CAPTOR e does not suck because the Germans,Brits and Italians are braindead and the French are *censored*ing smart. It's because the the whole project is a bureaucratic shit show along with disagreement on how to take the project forward. The French got out at the right time. The aesa variant is working very well on the typhoon thats why Qatar ended up ordering typhoons. You must be living under a rock if you think captor doesn't have an aesa variant. The problem is there is no CAESOR but they ended up with two different aesa which they will upgrade again and again till we end up with two different typhoons entirely..
 

Lolwa

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There is no radar upgrade in F4 standard . Could link me some news related to it becuase I can't find any. As per as dassault road map f4 and f5 will have software improvments and upgrade in Spectra ew library. It's the f6 which will get the GaN (most probably) radar.
CAESOR radar is for a long time on their plan with Leonardo developing it. And they will be using the Raven ES 05 as there base from what I've read.
Now at present because the Germans are retarded they didn't want to invest in aesa while the Brits wanted an aesa. Which resulted in seperate radar development. BAE has got the contract to upgrade the British typhoons to tranche 3a standard with aesa which will be different to the rest of the euro typhoons. Now the qataris will get aesa on their typhoons the question is whose aesa will it be bae 's or Leonardo's. And the aesa for the Brits has both modes a2a a2g while the German version doesn't(I know Leonardo is italian).
Just checked so apparently there are three radars .
The qataris will get mk 0 radar . The quadriga are working on mk1 radar. The Brits are working on mk2 radar with ecm function
So three aesa radars similar but different still. This is just pathetic..
 

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There is no radar upgrade in F4 standard . Could link me some news related to it becuase I can't find any. As per as dassault road map f4 and f5 will have software improvments and upgrade in Spectra ew library. It's the f6 which will get the GaN (most probably) radar.
CAESOR radar is for a long time on their plan with Leonardo developing it. And they will be using the Raven ES 05 as there base from what I've read.
Now at present because the Germans are retarded they didn't want to invest in aesa while the Brits wanted an aesa. Which resulted in seperate radar development. BAE has got the contract to upgrade the British typhoons to tranche 3a standard with aesa which will be different to the rest of the euro typhoons. Now the qataris will get aesa on their typhoons the question is whose aesa will it be bae 's or Leonardo's. And the aesa for the Brits has both modes a2a a2g while the German version doesn't(I know Leonardo is italian).
https://www.defense-aerospace.com/dae/sponsors/sponsor_rafale/img/fox3_19.pdf
Thales is heavily investing on the promising Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology that will shape the future of the Rafale’s sensors from 2025. Compared to current AESA modules, GaN transmitters/ receivers will prove even more powerful, but with reduced electric and cooling requirements, allowing the RBE2 radar’s already impressive performance to be significantly increased and additional functionalities to be performed via the radar antenna. New multifunction GaN arrays are likely to find their way onto the Rafale, thus multiplying the number of sensor apertures to enlarge the radar’s field of view. GaN antennas will also be adopted for the Spectra jammers. Various new weapons are due to be introduced for the Rafale over the coming years, either as part of spiral upgrades or as part of the future Standard F4, including upgraded Scalp stealth cruise missiles of the Scalp / Storm Shadow family and improved and heavier Hammer (Highly Agile, Modular Munition Extended Range) precision weapons. The Mica family of air-to-air missiles will be upgraded too, to guarantee operational relevance against a whole range of emerging threats. With all these improvements on the horizon, the battle-hardened Rafale will remain a lethal combat tool for the foreseeable future. Thanks to constant investment, to the unconditional support of the French Defence Procurement Agency and to the recent successes on the export market, the Rafale is set to stay in production for years to come, with an additional batch of Rafales likely to be procured by the French MoD around 2020.

From a different place, I don't have the link:

Standard F4 will bring a host of new capabilities. A new tactical datalink, and new GaN technology for the active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and jammers are just some of the promised advances.

“Standard F4 will be even more ambitious than F3R,” explained the programme director. “While F3R is mainly restricted to software upgrades, new hardware will be required for the far-reaching F4, even though the airframe will remain unchanged. In practice, F4 will be split into F4.1, for older, in-service aircraft, and F4.2, for new-build airframes. F4.1 will be limited to a number of improvements only in order to avoid complex hardware changes, but F4.1 will accept the new Rafale weapons now being developed. F4.2 will include the whole package of upgrades for the radar, the electronic warfare suite, the Front Sector Optronics and the cockpit to accommodate a helmet-mounted display (HMD).

Thales and the DGA are actively preparing the future radar developments that will be introduced on Standard F4.2, incorporating cutting-edge Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology for the radar and jammer antennas. Thanks to additional radar apertures, detection capabilities will be unmatched and electronic attack capabilities will become a reality. The programme director explained: “Even though we are entirely satisfied with the current RBE2 AESA radar, we are already working on the next generation scheduled to appear on new-build aircraft in 2025. “For the same volume, GaN technology will offer an expanded bandwidth, more radiated power and an even easier ability to switch from one mode to another, or from one functionality to another. With the same antenna, we will be capable of generating combined, interleaved radar, jamming and electronic warfare modes as part of an electronic attack mission. “GaN emitters will not be restricted to the radar and they will also equip the Spectra suite. For example, for the antennas in the wing apexes, ahead of the canard foreplanes, we could obtain a very quick emission/reception cycle, either saving some volume or augmenting radiated power. On Tranche 5 Rafales, we will have at our disposal twice the amount of transmitted power for the radar and jamming antennas. Thales has already produced and tested in laboratories a series of GaN module prototypes for the new radar and initial testing results look extremely promising. “Following the entry into service of the AESA in 2013, the deliveries of the Meteor in 2018 will push the Rafale into a class of its own – we will be the only ones in the world operating a fighter equipped with an AESA and a ramjet-propelled missile – but we have to keep investing to maintain our leadership. This is the reason why this GaN technological path is so important, especially for the development of additional emitting panels and apertures that will offer extended radar angular coverage. “It is not just an improvement; it is a real technological breakthrough in the field of detection. Jamming modes will not be left untouched and will push the Rafale’s electronic warfare capabilities to unprecedented levels thanks to the introduction of what we call ‘smart jamming’, with a wider band coverage and GaN emitters from 2025. These capabilities will be further expanded thanks to the adoption of MFAs [Multi-Function Arrays].” The Rafale’s Front Sector Optronics (FSO) will be fitted with a new-generation infrared search and track (IRST) sensor optimised for the tracking of air targets, either alone, or in conjunction with the RBE2 radar.



As for Typhoon's radar, let's see what it's like after it's ready. It's taken the LCA route of missed deadlines.
 

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https://www.defense-aerospace.com/dae/sponsors/sponsor_rafale/img/fox3_19.pdf
Thales is heavily investing on the promising Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology that will shape the future of the Rafale’s sensors from 2025. Compared to current AESA modules, GaN transmitters/ receivers will prove even more powerful, but with reduced electric and cooling requirements, allowing the RBE2 radar’s already impressive performance to be significantly increased and additional functionalities to be performed via the radar antenna. New multifunction GaN arrays are likely to find their way onto the Rafale, thus multiplying the number of sensor apertures to enlarge the radar’s field of view. GaN antennas will also be adopted for the Spectra jammers. Various new weapons are due to be introduced for the Rafale over the coming years, either as part of spiral upgrades or as part of the future Standard F4, including upgraded Scalp stealth cruise missiles of the Scalp / Storm Shadow family and improved and heavier Hammer (Highly Agile, Modular Munition Extended Range) precision weapons. The Mica family of air-to-air missiles will be upgraded too, to guarantee operational relevance against a whole range of emerging threats. With all these improvements on the horizon, the battle-hardened Rafale will remain a lethal combat tool for the foreseeable future. Thanks to constant investment, to the unconditional support of the French Defence Procurement Agency and to the recent successes on the export market, the Rafale is set to stay in production for years to come, with an additional batch of Rafales likely to be procured by the French MoD around 2020.

From a different place, I don't have the link:

Standard F4 will bring a host of new capabilities. A new tactical datalink, and new GaN technology for the active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and jammers are just some of the promised advances.

“Standard F4 will be even more ambitious than F3R,” explained the programme director. “While F3R is mainly restricted to software upgrades, new hardware will be required for the far-reaching F4, even though the airframe will remain unchanged. In practice, F4 will be split into F4.1, for older, in-service aircraft, and F4.2, for new-build airframes. F4.1 will be limited to a number of improvements only in order to avoid complex hardware changes, but F4.1 will accept the new Rafale weapons now being developed. F4.2 will include the whole package of upgrades for the radar, the electronic warfare suite, the Front Sector Optronics and the cockpit to accommodate a helmet-mounted display (HMD).

Thales and the DGA are actively preparing the future radar developments that will be introduced on Standard F4.2, incorporating cutting-edge Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology for the radar and jammer antennas. Thanks to additional radar apertures, detection capabilities will be unmatched and electronic attack capabilities will become a reality. The programme director explained: “Even though we are entirely satisfied with the current RBE2 AESA radar, we are already working on the next generation scheduled to appear on new-build aircraft in 2025. “For the same volume, GaN technology will offer an expanded bandwidth, more radiated power and an even easier ability to switch from one mode to another, or from one functionality to another. With the same antenna, we will be capable of generating combined, interleaved radar, jamming and electronic warfare modes as part of an electronic attack mission. “GaN emitters will not be restricted to the radar and they will also equip the Spectra suite. For example, for the antennas in the wing apexes, ahead of the canard foreplanes, we could obtain a very quick emission/reception cycle, either saving some volume or augmenting radiated power. On Tranche 5 Rafales, we will have at our disposal twice the amount of transmitted power for the radar and jamming antennas. Thales has already produced and tested in laboratories a series of GaN module prototypes for the new radar and initial testing results look extremely promising. “Following the entry into service of the AESA in 2013, the deliveries of the Meteor in 2018 will push the Rafale into a class of its own – we will be the only ones in the world operating a fighter equipped with an AESA and a ramjet-propelled missile – but we have to keep investing to maintain our leadership. This is the reason why this GaN technological path is so important, especially for the development of additional emitting panels and apertures that will offer extended radar angular coverage. “It is not just an improvement; it is a real technological breakthrough in the field of detection. Jamming modes will not be left untouched and will push the Rafale’s electronic warfare capabilities to unprecedented levels thanks to the introduction of what we call ‘smart jamming’, with a wider band coverage and GaN emitters from 2025. These capabilities will be further expanded thanks to the adoption of MFAs [Multi-Function Arrays].” The Rafale’s Front Sector Optronics (FSO) will be fitted with a new-generation infrared search and track (IRST) sensor optimised for the tracking of air targets, either alone, or in conjunction with the RBE2 radar.



As for Typhoon's radar, let's see what it's like after it's ready. It's taken the LCA route of missed deadlines.
If that's the case it would be better we select f15x in the mmrca and wait for the 4.2 to get online. And buy it 54 of those as the follow-up for our 36 rafales. This is highly impractical but would be really nice.
 

randomradio

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If that's the case it would be better we select f15x in the mmrca and wait for the 4.2 to get online. And buy it 54 of those as the follow-up for our 36 rafales. This is highly impractical but would be really nice.
All that was planned and killed. Now there's only MMRCA.

Too much politics behind Rafale now.

F-15X is dead weight. Since we already operate MKI, upgraded MKIs are the better option.
 

A Person

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CAPTOR has superior range still and is one of the most powerful radars when it comes to range and to be serious rbe 2 aesa is a good radar but far from being powerful. The radome can't fit that many trm modules compared to the typhoon.You can fanboy rafale if you want but it's afact . Even apg 80 of f16 and apg79 is said to be superior in range compared to rbe 2 aesa.
Yeah, but no.

Rumors and hearsay do not make facts. The RBE2 has enough TRM to be a very powerful radar in its own right, and the CAPTOR-E isn't going to have that much more since they want to have a mobile switchplate, which dramatically reduces the size your antenna can have since it needs to have enough room to move.

If that's the case it would be better we select f15x in the mmrca and wait for the 4.2 to get online. And buy it 54 of those as the follow-up for our 36 rafales. This is highly impractical but would be really nice.
Did you forget it takes three years to build an aircraft? 2025 - 3 = 2022. When is the MMRCA2 supposed to be signed, again?

I don't see the point of F-15 for India, it'd basically just be there to be the American Su-30MKI.
 

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Yeah, but no.

Rumors and hearsay do not make facts. The RBE2 has enough TRM to be a very powerful radar in its own right, and the CAPTOR-E isn't going to have that much more since they want to have a mobile switchplate, which dramatically reduces the size your antenna can have since it needs to have enough room to move.



Did you forget it takes three years to build an aircraft? 2025 - 3 = 2022. When is the MMRCA2 supposed to be signed, again?

I don't see the point of F-15 for India, it'd basically just be there to be the American Su-30MKI.
The deal will be signed with the f4 standard not the f4.2 so we won't be getting the new radar even if the deal is signed in 2022 so it's wasted. The only other aircrafts that are worth then are the typhoon>f15>hornet.
There is no rumours it's a fact the typhoon holds bigger amount of trm modules even the f16 apg 80 holds more trm modules. If you are some special dassault marketing employee who knows the exact trm modules of rbe 2 then please tell us because every decent aviation expert has said that captor has more trm modules than rbe 2.