Auxiliary Ships of Indian Navy : News and Discussions

Amarante

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Sea trials for floating missile test range INS Anvesh begin this month​

The FTR will not only speed up the missile projects of DRDO but also allow live testing of interceptor missiles for phase II of Ballistic Missile Defence program.

 
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Gautam

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A Deepak class fleet tanker at HSL
IMG_20181017_101236.jpg

2017-01-04.jpg
 
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aditya g

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Leased trawlers
 

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Gautam

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The photo in that tweet is the old Sandhayak class survey ships of the Indian Navy that were commissioned into service in the late 70s. A total of 8 Sandhayak class survey ships were built by GRSE for the Navy, each vessel weighing ~1930 tons. The 1st two ships of the class INS Sandhayak (J18) & INS Nirdeshak (J19) have been decommissioned recently.

The Navy sought a replacement for the Sandhayak class survey vessels so a tender for 4 new survey vessels was out in 2016. The Navy wanted the new ships to displace ~3300 tons. GRSE won that tender, thus this new class of large survey vessels were tentatively named the GRSE-class survey vessels. The design work was done by Vik-Sandvik with inputs from GRSE. The ship will see use of modular construction practices. Below you can see the new GRSE class large survey vessel's design.
1638888030607.png

On the 5th of December 2021, the 1st ship of this class was launched. The 1st ship is named Sandhayak, using the old Sandhayak as the namesake. It is a pretty common practice for the Navy to name a new ship after an old decommissioned ship. However the new ship seems to have the same pennant number (J18) as the old one. That is not common practice, I don't know why they are doing this.

Photos from the ship launch ceremony:
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gettyimages-1237030674-2048x2048.jpg

Here you can see the bow thruster. The are multiple thrusters present on the stern too:
gettyimages-1237030954-2048x2048.jpg

The helicopter bay doesn't have a door yet:
gettyimages-1237030985-2048x2048.jpg

There was a question on a different thread asking why we launch our ships before making the superstructure. That is clearly not the case here. I think it is a case specific matter. Plenty of our ships get launched with no superstructure while other ships have a lot of superstructure in place before launch.
gettyimages-1237030590-2048x2048.jpg

gettyimages-1237020719-2048x2048.jpg

Have to give credit to GRSE, this ship was laid down in Nov 2019 & launched on Dec 2021. It will be commissioned by October 2022. ~3 years from laid down to in service for a 3300 ton ship during a global pandemic with all the manpower & supply chain problems. For comparison the Kamorta class ASW corvettes also weighing 3300 tons took 7-8 years to go from laid down to in service.

Naval News had an interesting tidbit. Here is the exact quote from the article:

As per build strategy adopted by GRSE, first ship is being built at GRSE Ltd and construction of balance three ships is envisaged at M/s L&T Shipbuilding, Kattupalli.

Source: India's First Survey Vessel (Large) Launched by GRSE - Naval News

Remember the 2016 Navy tender for the 4 large survey ships ? L&T Shipbuilding was the primary competition for GRSE. It was a closely fought competition, in the end L&T lost out by a thin margin. So why is L&T going to other 3 ships ?

Few months back GRSE was laying the keel of the 3rd survey vessel. Now what is this talk of L&T making the other 3 ships ? The only ship of this class that has not been lad down is the 4th ship.

KEEL LAYING CEREMONY FOR 1st WARSHIP OF ASW SHALLOW WATER CRAFT PROJECT AND 3rd WARSHIP OF SURVEY VESSEL LARGE PROJECT
 

aditya g

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Nice pics.

Note the bow thruster. Also seems to be a rather large ship judging by size of the hangar.

The photo in that tweet is the old Sandhayak class survey ships of the Indian Navy that were commissioned into service in the late 70s. A total of 8 Sandhayak class survey ships were built by GRSE for the Navy, each vessel weighing ~1930 tons. The 1st two ships of the class INS Sandhayak (J18) & INS Nirdeshak (J19) have been decommissioned recently.

The Navy sought a replacement for the Sandhayak class survey vessels so a tender for 4 new survey vessels was out in 2016. The Navy wanted the new ships to displace ~3300 tons. GRSE won that tender, thus this new class of large survey vessels were tentatively named the GRSE-class survey vessels. The design work was done by Vik-Sandvik with inputs from GRSE. The ship will see use of modular construction practices. Below you can see the new GRSE class large survey vessel's design.
View attachment 22000
On the 5th of December 2021, the 1st ship of this class was launched. The 1st ship is named Sandhayak, using the old Sandhayak as the namesake. It is a pretty common practice for the Navy to name a new ship after an old decommissioned ship. However the new ship seems to have the same pennant number (J18) as the old one. That is not common practice, I don't know why they are doing this.

Photos from the ship launch ceremony:
View attachment 22003
View attachment 22004
View attachment 22002
View attachment 22009
Here you can see the bow thruster. The are multiple thrusters present on the stern too:
View attachment 22005
The helicopter bay doesn't have a door yet:
View attachment 22006
There was a question on a different thread asking why we launch our ships before making the superstructure. That is clearly not the case here. I think it is a case specific matter. Plenty of our ships get launched with no superstructure while other ships have a lot of superstructure in place before launch.
View attachment 22008
View attachment 22007
Have to give credit to GRSE, this ship was laid down in Nov 2019 & launched on Dec 2021. It will be commissioned by October 2022. ~3 years from laid down to in service for a 3300 ton ship during a global pandemic with all the manpower & supply chain problems. For comparison the Kamorta class ASW corvettes also weighing 3300 tons took 7-8 years to go from laid down to in service.

Naval News had an interesting tidbit. Here is the exact quote from the article:



Source: India's First Survey Vessel (Large) Launched by GRSE - Naval News

Remember the 2016 Navy tender for the 4 large survey ships ? L&T Shipbuilding was the primary competition for GRSE. It was a closely fought competition, in the end L&T lost out by a thin margin. So why is L&T going to other 3 ships ?

Few months back GRSE was laying the keel of the 3rd survey vessel. Now what is this talk of L&T making the other 3 ships ? The only ship of this class that has not been lad down is the 4th ship.

KEEL LAYING CEREMONY FOR 1st WARSHIP OF ASW SHALLOW WATER CRAFT PROJECT AND 3rd WARSHIP OF SURVEY VESSEL LARGE PROJECT

...................................
 

Tatvamasi

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Jan 5, 2018
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267797919_1695186450836208_6439684453510395179_n.jpg


Based on a request from the Government of Maharashtra, the Indian navy deployed INS Makar, a hydrographic survey ship, on 18 December 2021 to search for the missing fishing boat Naved-2 in the Arabian Sea off Ratnagiri coast. The boat went missing on 26 October 2021 and could have become a hazard to navigation. The Maharashtra Government had also informed the Navy of a missing member of the boat's crew. On deployment, the ship, through her specialised sonar equipment, located the wreckage of the boat on the seabed with one half-submerged in the mud. After ascertaining the safe depth above the boat wreck, coordinated diving was conducted with marine police, Jaigad and the mortal remains of the missing crew member was also recovered by the ship.
 

Gautam

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In 2014 INS Shakti (A57) along with INS Ranjit (D53), INS Shivalik (F47) & INS Airavat (L24) were used by the Navy for rescuing civilians from the eastern coast just before the Cyclone Hudhud hit the coastline.

Here you can see INS Shakti pictured from INS Ranjit:
20140120_124253.jpg


20140120_124800.jpg
 

aditya g

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May 11, 2020
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Kudos to the Navy. But in this instance a civilian ferry style boat would have been better - more comforts for the rescued civilians and potentially more capacity as well in a smaller package.

While we aim for the gold standard Mistral style LPD/LHD - there may be no harm in acquiring a troop transport or ocean going ferry as well.

In 2014 INS Shakti (A57) along with INS Ranjit (D53), INS Shivalik (F47) & INS Airavat (L24) were used by the Navy for rescuing civilians from the eastern coast just before the Cyclone Hudhud hit the coastline.

Here you can see INS Shakti pictured from INS Ranjit:
View attachment 22135

View attachment 22128
 
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Gautam

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Kudos to the Navy. But in this instance a civilian ferry style boat would have been better - more comforts for the rescued civilians and potentially more capacity as well in a smaller package.

While we aim for the gold standard Mistral style LPD/LHD - there may be no harm in acquiring a troop transport or ocean going ferry as well.
Totally agree. In fact there are many navies & coast guards around the world that acquire & operate civilian boats for HADR missions. We don't have dedicated hospital ships either. Given the frequency with which we engage in HADR missions we should have at least a small fleet of hospital ships.

We have the design & manufacturing capacities for both civilian ferries & for military hospital ships. Yet the Navy has made no attempt to acquire either. Side effects of having the smallest share of the defence budget perhaps ?
 
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_Anonymous_

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Totally agree. In fact there are many navies & coast guards around the world that acquire & operate civilian boats for HADR missions. We don't have dedicated hospital ships either. Given the frequency with which we engage in HADR missions we should have at least a small fleet of hospital ships.

We have the design & manufacturing capacities for both civilian ferries & for military hospital ships. Yet the Navy has made no attempt to acquire either. Side effects of having the smallest share of the defence budget perhaps ?
Ideally all these activities fall under the remit of the Coast Guard. But given the level or rather lack of strategic thinking apart from the finances , it took a 26/11 to convince our security managers to entrust ICG completely ( & on the IN's insistence ) with the security of our coast line.

13 yrs down the line it's still WiP. Once that is through , you can expect some movement on the HADR front. In between a disaster or 2 would certainly aid this cause . After all that's how we function.
 

aditya g

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In the grander scheme of things, a civil spec ship cannot even put a dent on Navy's budget. And yes these can also serve as hospital ships. Instead Navy keeps employing destroyers, OPVs, tankers, LSTs for HADR ... and has configured Sandhayak class as hospital ship in secondary role. The navy need not acquire a huge fleet - even 1 or 2 ferry ships will be good enough and be kept busy.

We have more than enough expertise to build ferries:


CSL Launches Passenger/Cargo Ship for Andaman

Laxman Pai February 3, 2020

Cochin Shipyard Ltd, the largest shipbuilding and maintenance facility in India, launched passenger/cargo ship for Andaman & Nicobar (A&N) Administration.

The vessel is designed as a modern high-quality passenger vessel with electric propulsion suitable for carrying 1,200 passengers and 1,000 tonnes of cargo for “all-weather” operation on the mainland-to-A&N route.

The ship is built to the highest standards of the Indian Register of Shipping and Lloyds Register of Shipping overseen by the DG Shipping of India and meets the requirements of “Class III Special Trade Passenger Ship” as per Indian Merchant Shipping rules.

The vessel is built in steel as a modern, safe and seaworthy vessel with aesthetic lines and pleasant profile. The speciality of this vessel is that is comes with “Safe Return to Port” (SRtP) compliance which is envisaged to be a ‘first’ in Asia. The ship would not only enable safe & comfortable passenger movement, but will also be a boost to the tourism sector.

The vessel has modern cafeteria, and recreation rooms. Both Cabin Class (consisting of Deluxe Cabins, First Class Cabins & Second Class Cabins) and Bunk Class accommodation is available on-board. With a speed of 18 knots, the ship combines speed with comfort and would have a complement of 104 staff.

The vessel is approx 157 Mtr long. It will now undergo outfitting & building up of the accommodation & living quarters, after which it will undergo testing & trials prior to delivery to the A&N islands in 2021.

This vessel is part of the order for a series of 4 vessels viz; 02 nos 500 pax cum 150T cargo vessels and 02 nos 1200 pax cum 1000T cargo vessels, placed on CSL by the A&N Administration. The second 1200 pax vessel is also under construction at CSL.

In the meantime, CSL is in advanced stages of completion of the 02 nos 500 pax vessels for inter-island operations at the A&N.

The first 500 pax vessel is scheduled to undergo sea trials next month and expected to be delivered ‘ready-for-service’ for the A&N islands in March 2020. The second 500 pax vessel is currently undergoing outfitting and will be ready for delivery to the islands in June 2020.


These ferries can also be used for out of area operations which don't see a contested beach landing.

I also agree that there is lack of clarity on the roles up at the top - what stops ICG from going ahead and investing in more robust HADR capabilities.

Recently INS Shardul was tasked to tow MV Kavaratti from A&N to mainland - how about asking ICG to step up instead? Not only civil admin but IN should also be able to rely on ICG for salvage operations.

Totally agree. In fact there are many navies & coast guards around the world that acquire & operate civilian boats for HADR missions. We don't have dedicated hospital ships either. Given the frequency with which we engage in HADR missions we should have at least a small fleet of hospital ships.

We have the design & manufacturing capacities for both civilian ferries & for military hospital ships. Yet the Navy has made no attempt to acquire either. Side effects of having the smallest share of the defence budget perhaps ?

But given the level or rather lack of strategic thinking apart from the finances , it took a 26/11 to convince our security managers to entrust ICG completely ( & on the IN's insistence ) with the security of our coast line.

13 yrs down the line it's still WiP. Once that is through , you can expect some movement on the HADR front. In between a disaster or 2 would certainly aid this cause . After all that's how we function
 

Ankit Kumar

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DELIVERY OF 50TON BOLLARD PULL TUG “BALBIR” TO NAVAL DOCKYARD VISAKHAPATNAM BY M/S HINDUSTAN SHIPYARD LTD
Posted On: 24 JAN 2022 7:30PM by PIB Delhi
Contract for construction of 50Ton Bollard Pull Tugs was concluded with M/s Hindustan Shipyard Ltd, Visakhapatnam in Feb 19. The Fourth tug in the series, “Balbir” has been delivered to Naval Dockyard, Mumbai on 24 Jan 22. These tugs have been designed and built under the classification rules of Indian Register for Shipping (IRS) with a service life of 20 years and are capable of assisting large naval ships, including Aircraft Carrier and Submarines in berthing, un-berthing, turning and manoeuvering in confined waters and in harbour. They also provide afloat firefighting cover/assistance to ships alongside/anchorage and have limited capability for Search and Rescue operations.

Induction of 50Ton Bollard Pull Tugs has significantly augmented the auxiliary support services and enhanced the capability to meet high operational requirements of Fleet assets of Indian Navy. With all major and auxiliary equipment/system sourced from indigenous manufacturers, these tugs are proud flag bearers of “Make in India, Make for the World” initiatives of Ministry of Defence in consonance with “Atmanirbhar Bharat”. Tugs “Veeran” and “Balraj” have been inducted on 22 Oct 21 and 31 Dec 21 at Naval Dockyard, Visakhapatnam respectively and “Balram” on 30 Oct 21 at Naval Dockyard, Mumbai. Despite unprecedented challenges posed due to the impact of 1st and 2nd wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, M/s Hindustan Shipyard Ltd has put in untiring and concerted efforts to deliver these tugs to Indian Navy.
 
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