Auxiliary Ships of Indian Navy : News and Discussions

Ashwin

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Pic from grse twitter handle of the large survey vessel.Are they using modular construction for these as well?
Yes.

20201206_172802.jpg
 
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RISING SUN

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Indian Navy inks deal with Titagarh Wagons for construction of Diving Support Crafts​

New Delhi [India], February 12 (ANI): Indian Navy on Friday signed a contract for the construction of five Diving Support Crafts (DSCs) with Titagarh Wagons Limited, Kolkata.

"The contract envisages the construction of five DSCs. Once commissioned, the DSC will meet the mission needs of Command Clearance Diving Teams (CCDTs) which are involved in providing diving assistance to all ships inside and close to the harbour for underwater repair, maintenance, and salvage," said an official statement.

The statement added, "Fitted with state of the art diving equipment and tools for performing diving operations, Diving Support Craft will be a game-changer in conducting diving operations and will serve as an ideal platform for conducting training of the Indian Navy's diving cadre." (ANI)
 

RISING SUN

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Hindustan Shipyard to build 5 naval support vessels with Turkish help​

Visakhapatnam-based Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL) is expecting an order from the Indian Navy by the year end for building five mammoth naval support vessels with transfer of technology from a Turkish shipbuilding firm, people familiar with the developments said on Monday.

The project, estimated to cost between $1.5 billion and $2 billion, will involve transfer of technology from Anadolu Shipyard, part of the TAIS consortium of Turkey, with which HSL signed an agreement for technical collaboration last year.

HSL is expected to deliver the first fleet support vessel (FSV) to the navy within four years of the go-ahead, with the other ships to be delivered at the rate of one every 10 months to 12 months. The vessels will be 230 metres long and have a displacement of 45,000 tonnes. FSVs carry fuel and other supplies for warships.

“The agreement with the Turkish consortium will kick in after HSL gets an order from the Indian Navy. If all goes well, that could happen by October 2021. Several Indian vendors will also be involved in the project,” said one of the people cited above, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Unlike other massive projects of this type, which usually witness at least one of the vessels being constructed in the country providing the technology and know-how, the Turkish side has decided to go ahead with transfer of technology from the initial stages and back the “Make in India” initiative by constructing all five vessels at HSL, said a second person who too declined to be named.

“Turkey’s shipyards are fully booked for a long time and there is nothing to lose by transferring technology and having all the vessels built in India. Turkish engineers will come to India to assist with the project,” the second person said.

Besides designs, the Turkish consortium will provide engineering services, planning and preparation of specifications, the people said. The transfer of technology will also boost India’s shipbuilding capabilities, they added.

Maritime affairs expert, Rear Admiral (retired) Sudarshan Shrikhande, said: “There is a need for the navy to have fleet support ships. While HSL may have a sort of a collaborative arrangement for transfer of technology and building these in Visakhapatnam, one is not aware if a contract may be in the offing or whether discussions are continuing.”

TAIS, which is a member of Turkey's largest industrial group, and HSL concluded an agreement for cooperation in the first quarter of last year, after the issue had come under a cloud for some time because of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s criticism of the Indian government’s decision to scrap Jammu and Kashmir’s special status in 2019. Questions were also raised in some quarters because of the strong defence ties between Turkey and Pakistan.

The Turkish consortium was the lowest bidder for the contract to make the FSVs. Moreover, some other bidders had insisted that at least one of the vessels should be made in a foreign shipyard. The agreement with TAIS was signed after clearance by the Indian defence ministry, the people cited above said.

Sameer Patil, fellow for international security studies at Gateway House, said both countries were displaying pragmatism against a backdrop of long-standing concerns in India about Turkey’s defence relationship with Pakistan.

“Turkey under President Erdogan has focused on building commercial relations with all countries. This pragmatism is being seen in this effort to collaborate with India despite the proximity with Pakistan. India wants to build its naval capabilities and Turkey has a defence industry that is very advanced,” he said.

“If Turkey is offering transfer of technology, why should we say no?” Patil said, noting that Turkish company Savronik was given sub-contracts for building key parts of the strategic Atal Tunnel under Rohtang Pass in Himachal Pradesh.
 

Ashwin

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Another contract inked by Navy. These are relatively small programs - but they all add up and is an indication of a smooth procurement system.

In less than 1 month, IN has signed on 3 contracts totally 24 ships/vessels! All orders going to smaller yards.

Impressive!. How are they constantly going to smaller yards. Is it a policy directive?
 
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Amal

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Bigger yards have their hands full. And the only private shipyard available has been getting shafted.

lol, no. Bigger private yards have limited orders & are suffering financial troubles. Case in point- L&T's shipbuilding subsidiary which had troubles staying afloat & has been amalgamated into L&T.

This is a very small order by value. These are basically barges- there are several yards win Goa & even Kerala without even a proper website who build such vessels.
 

aditya g

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Impressive!. How are they constantly going to smaller yards. Is it a policy directive?

There was an order recently that mandated that orders upto 100(?) Crore go to small yards only. The contract value has not been published so we cannot say with authority if the order was meant for small SY.

My take is:

1. MoD/IN should keep a finite list of SYs for their orders. Simplicity/size of ships may be small, but design and build standards should be high.

2. There is a risk of IN/ICG orders being spread too thin - like we saw in the last privatisation push where Alcock, Bharathi Shipyard went under. Modest also went under but was rescued.

3. IN should consider going for slightly larger and multirole ships instead of going with small and single purpose type of auxiliaries. This could boost the commissioned ship strength so numbers look good. Yes this may increase costs.

The perfect example is Pakistan Navy Madadgar and Rasadgar ships built under Small Tanker and Utility Ship program by KSEW. On face of it coastal tankers but recently deployed all the way to UAE for NAVDEX to support the PN FACM.
 

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randomradio

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lol, no. Bigger private yards have limited orders & are suffering financial troubles. Case in point- L&T's shipbuilding subsidiary which had troubles staying afloat & has been amalgamated into L&T.

You missed the second sentence in my post.

This is a very small order by value. These are basically barges- there are several yards win Goa & even Kerala without even a proper website who build such vessels.

Govt military contracts typically end up with just a few shipyards.
Really? They don't have time and space to build these small vessels ?

They can, but with more investment and more hiring. But capacity will be underutilised elsewhere. Plus there are rules about giving business to small shipyards for small orders.
 
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RISING SUN

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Indian Navy signs contract with Suryadipta Projects for 11 ACTCM barges​

The Indian Navy has signed a contract with Suryadipta Projects to construct 11 ammunition-cum-torpedo-cum-missile (ACTCM) barges, said an official statement on Tuesday.
The contract withSuryadipta ProjectsPrivate Limited, a Thane-based MSME, was concludedon March 5, the Indian Navy's statement noted.


Delivery of barges is scheduled to commence from May 22. The ACTCM barges will be inducted in Indian Navy to undertake the mission needs for embarking or disembarking ammunition, torpedo, missile, etc. it mentioned.
The project adds another milestone to theAtmanirbharBharat and Make in India initiative of the government of India, it said.
 

Tatvamasi

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India has quietly commissioned its secretive nuclear missile tracking vessel that had been under construction since 2014, entering a select league of nations with the capability to monitor missile launches at long distances, enhancing the testing programme and adding a crucial part to a national missile defence system. Called the VC 11184, the specialised Ocean Surveillance Ship was commissioned in October last year in a ceremony that was not made public, sources have told ET. The ship delivery was delayed by a few months due to the Covid-19 crisis but all tests and trails were cleared in 2020 to ensure it is ready to enter service. The ship — only four other nations operate similar vessels — will be operated by a joint crew of the National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO), the Defence Research and Development Organisation and the Indian Navy. At present, only the US, France, China and Russia operate similar vessels that are used to track missile launches at sea. The vessel will be able to monitor India’s developmental trials of missiles of greater range than ever before — virtually unlimited due to its ability to traverse the oceans. Besides, it will have the ability to detect launches by adversaries like Pakistan and China, giving India an early warning capability. The 15,000 tonne ship, which has specialised surveillance systems of three dome-shaped antennas packed with sensors, has been extensively tested since 2018 by the joint team. As reported by ET, the complex vessel will generate over 14 MW of power just to power up its tracking radars, which will have multiple roles from tracking enemy missiles to accurately giving data on tests that are routinely carried out of indigenous strategic missiles. The 15,000 tonne class vessel was initially constructed in a covered dry dock at the Hindustan Shipyard Ltd, the country’s largest, to keep roving satellites and spying attempts at bay. However, since 2018 the vessel has been docked in the open, with its large globe shaped radar placed on the aft giving a distinctive visibility to visitors at Vizag.