Auxiliary Ships of Indian Navy : News and Discussions

Gautam

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Feb 16, 2019
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Make in India: In a first, Turkish Company to help build FSS for the Indian Navy at HSL

By: Huma Siddiqui | Published: July 16, 2019 8:09:10 PM
The HSL is hoping to follow the best shipbuilding practices and modern technology including the pre-outfitting and modular construction.
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According to officials, the Turkish shipyard is expected to provide ship design, supply key machinery equipment (KME) and provide technical assistance.

The Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL) is expected to sign a contract with the Indian Navy for the 45,000-ton fleet support ships (FSS) for the Indian Navy in the second quarter of 2020, if all goes well with the ongoing negotiations.

RAdm LV Sarat Babu, CMD of Hindustan Shipyard Ltd, told Financial Express Online in an exclusive interaction that, “The Turkish Shipyard turned out to be L1 and technically qualified for the FSS project for the Indian Navy and is technically qualified. It was down selected from among three companies which had made the cut earlier.”
(And now you know how the Turks got selected.:rolleyes:)

Seven global players had initially responded to the Request for Proposal including the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Italy based Fincantieri, Navantia from Spain, Rosboronexports (ROE) from Russia and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard for the construction of five ships under the FSS project at the estimated cost of $ 2.3 billion. Out of these only three including TKMS, ROE and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard were shortlisted.

According to the CMD of the HSL shipyard, no contract has been signed yet. Detailed analysis of technical and financial assessment is going on. “Once the evaluation is over, and every requirement is met, there will be another round of price negotiations. Then the next stage will be going to the Indian Navy and the Ministry of Defence before the final deal is inked in the second quarter next year.”

This will be the first time that a Turkish shipyard will participate in any defense contract in India if it goes through. “Though Anadolu Shipyard is part of TAIS industrial group, the discussions are going on with the shipyard and not the group,” Babu specified.

According to officials, the Turkish shipyard is expected to provide ship design, supply key machinery equipment (KME) and provide technical assistance.

The HSL is hoping to follow the best shipbuilding practices and modern technology including the pre-outfitting and modular construction.

The construction of the five ships of about 45,000 tons full load displacement is expected to give not only fillip to the HSL but also to the local industry and other medium and small scale companies. “For the Made in India ships, the components are all going to be Indian, including the steel,” said a senior officer.


Besides the job opportunities, the huge project will provide, there will also be a two-fold increase not only in the capacity building of the local industries with blasting, zonal painting, cable laying.

Make in India: In a first, Turkish Company to help build FSS for the Indian Navy at HSL
 
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Gautam

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Some pics of IN LCU L-56 from Naval Dockyard, Visakhapatnam. The ship shall be based at Port Blair under Naval Component Commander, HQ Andaman & Nicobar Command.

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Gautam

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VAdm AK Jain FOCinC(E) to commission 6th Landing Craft Utility IN LCU L-56. The ship is sixth in series of eight being built by M/s Garden Reach Shipbuilders &Engineers Ltd. Kolkata & 100th warship fm M/s.GRSE.

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Ashwin

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UNGA fallout: Turkish Company could be out of the FSS project for Indian Navy

The Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL)’s collaboration with M/s Anadolu Shipyard, Turkey for the FSS project estimated to cost of $ 2.3 billion is expected to be put on a hold.

Without citing any reason, speaking to Financial Express Online on condition of anonymity, a senior official confirmed that “The contract for the 45,000-ton fleet support ships (FSS) for the Indian Navy with the Turkish Company could be delayed.”

“It could be a fall out of Turkey cosying up to Pakistan and raising Kashmir issue at the recently concluded 74th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA),” said the officer.

It may be recalled that the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had raised the Kashmir issue and had criticised the international community for not paying attention to the situation. On the sidelines of the UNGA, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met with leaders of Turkey’s strong rivals and close neighbours –Cyprus, Armenia and Greece.

The Turkish Shipyard was L1 and had technically qualified for the FSS project for the Indian Navy from among three other global companies who were in the race for the construction of five ships. Seven global players had initially responded to the Request for Proposal — the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Fincantieri of Italy, Navantia from Spain, Rosboronexports (ROE) from Russia and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard. At the end of the scrutiny only three companies including TKMS, ROE and the Turkish Shipyard was shortlisted.

Though no contract has been inked yet as the analysis of the technical and financial assessment is going on, the Turkish shipyard as part of negotiations is expected to provide ship design, supply key machinery equipment (KME) and provide technical assistance.

On the completion of the evaluation, the second round of negotiations related to the price is on the agenda. This was the first time ever that a Turkish shipyardTurkish shipyard which is part of TAIS industrial group, participated in any defence contract in India.
 

Gautam

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UNGA fallout: Turkish Company could be out of the FSS project for Indian Navy

The Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL)’s collaboration with M/s Anadolu Shipyard, Turkey for the FSS project estimated to cost of $ 2.3 billion is expected to be put on a hold.

Without citing any reason, speaking to Financial Express Online on condition of anonymity, a senior official confirmed that “The contract for the 45,000-ton fleet support ships (FSS) for the Indian Navy with the Turkish Company could be delayed.”

“It could be a fall out of Turkey cosying up to Pakistan and raising Kashmir issue at the recently concluded 74th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA),” said the officer.

It may be recalled that the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had raised the Kashmir issue and had criticised the international community for not paying attention to the situation. On the sidelines of the UNGA, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met with leaders of Turkey’s strong rivals and close neighbours –Cyprus, Armenia and Greece.

The Turkish Shipyard was L1 and had technically qualified for the FSS project for the Indian Navy from among three other global companies who were in the race for the construction of five ships. Seven global players had initially responded to the Request for Proposal — the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Fincantieri of Italy, Navantia from Spain, Rosboronexports (ROE) from Russia and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard. At the end of the scrutiny only three companies including TKMS, ROE and the Turkish Shipyard was shortlisted.

Though no contract has been inked yet as the analysis of the technical and financial assessment is going on, the Turkish shipyard as part of negotiations is expected to provide ship design, supply key machinery equipment (KME) and provide technical assistance.

On the completion of the evaluation, the second round of negotiations related to the price is on the agenda. This was the first time ever that a Turkish shipyardTurkish shipyard which is part of TAIS industrial group, participated in any defence contract in India.

I don't get it. What technology do the Turks have in re-fueling ships that we don't ? Our current tankers have no problem fueling up a wide range of ships from a wide array of nations.

For example in 2014 we had the corvette INS Kirch (P62) and fleet tanker INS Jyoti(A58) of the Indian Navy with a frigate of the Singaporean Navy during SIMBEX 2011 in the South China Sea. Jyoti is fueling up both an old Indian Kora class corvette and a modern Singaporean Formidable class frigate at the same time.
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Here we have the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson(CVN 70) and the Indian Navy replenishment tanker INS Shakti (A57) conduct a refueling-at-sea exercise in Malabar 2012.
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The Deepak class fleet tankers are designed and built by the the Italian Fincantieri, INS Jyoti is Russian. But we did try our hands at making fleet tankers ourselves. The INS Aditya(A59) is essentially a stretched and modernised version of the Deepak class tankers buit by the GRSE.
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INS Aditya is a fully air-conditioned and lengthened version of the original Deepak Class, but with a multipurpose workshop and with four RAS (Replenishment At Sea) stations alongside. It is also armed with Igla missiles and CR-91 Naval guns. For a first attempt it fantastic.

Granted the INS Aditya, at only 25,000 tons, is not as big as navy's proposed FSS(which is 45,000 tons). But this much of displacement was never a problem for us, build time is.:cautious:

Instead of handing over the contract to the Turks, we could have just used this opportunity to introduce modular construction practices to making large ships. It would have been very beneficial to our industry. But foresight is unheard of in our country, now grab some popcorn and enjoy the show as the FSS gets mired in polito-bureaucratic quagmire and turns in to a "long-delayed-much-needed-but-never-approved" project akin to the LHD project.(y)
 

Gautam

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GRSE lays keel of the first large survey vessel

These vessels are 110m long with deep displacement of 3300 tonne and can accommodate 231 personnel. The vessel will have a cruising speed of 16 knots. The hull form of these new generations Survey Vessel also meets the stringent seakeeping and manoeuvring requirements including helicopter operations at high sea states.

By ANURADHA HIMATSINGKA, ET Bureau | Nov 9, 2019, 04.53 PM IST
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Kolkata: Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE) laid the keel of the first Survey Vessel (Large) in Kolkata.

This first ship is part of the four large Survey Vessels order won by GRSE in competitive bidding process in October 2018. The contract for four Survey Vessel Large was signed between GRSE and Government of India, Ministry of Defence. The total value of the order is Rs 2435.15 crore.

The first ship is to be delivered within 36 months from contract signing date with a project completion time of 54 months.

These vessels are 110m long with deep displacement of 3300 tonne and can accommodate 231 personnel. The vessel will have a cruising speed of 16 knots. The hull form of these new generations Survey Vessel also meets the stringent seakeeping and manoeuvring requirements including helicopter operations at high sea states.

With their state-of-the-art “Survey Payload” comprising of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, Remote Operated Vehicles, Multi Beam Echo Sounders etc, these Survey Ships will prove to be a game changer in the Indian Navy’s capabilities for coastal and deepwater hydrographic surveys aiding maritime operations. In their secondary role, they will be capable of performing limited search and rescue, limited ocean research and operate as hospital ship or casualty holding ships.

The warship builder posted a more than four-fold jump in net profit to Rs 59.02 crore in the second-quarter (Q2) of the current fiscal, on the back of higher revenue. The company had posted a net profit of Rs 12.78 crore in the corresponding period of 2018-19.

Revenue from operations for the quarter ended September 30, 2019, stood at Rs 439.02 crore compared to Rs 217.70 crore clocked in the same period of previous year. As many as 22 projects are in various stages of construction, with an order book of Rs 27,400 crore, the company said.

GRSE lays keel of the first large survey vessel
 

Gautam

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Tripura, NE, India
Malabar 2004 :
A refueling probe from the replenishment & repair ship INS Aditya(A59), is guided into a fueling receiver aboard the guided missile frigate USS Gary (FFG 51) off the coast of Goa, India on 05 October 2004.
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Malabar 2005 :
USS Chafee (DDG 90) getting some gas from INS Aditya.
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USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) links up to Aditya for some fuel.
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Malabar 2012 :
INS Betwa maintains position along INS Aditya's port side as the fuel hose is winched across to the receiving bell aboard Betwa.
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INS Teg receives fuel from INS Aditya. INS Trishul is visible on the horizon.
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INS Aditya entering Port Louis Mauritius(2016)
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INS Kolkata and INS Aditya in Mombasa harbour, Kenya
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RISING SUN

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Warship builder GRSE hands over Landing Craft Utility amphibious ship to Indian Navy
Adding to the country's maritime security prowess, warship builder Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) has delivered a Landing Craft Utility (LCU) to the Indian Navy, GRSE said here on Thursday.

The amphibious ship, that can transport and deploy main battle tanks, armoured vehicles, troops and equipment from ship to the shore, is seventh of eight such vessels being built for the Navy by GRSE, it said in a statement.

These ships can also be deployed for multi-role activities like beaching operations, search and rescue, disaster relief operations, supply and replenishment and evacuation from distant islands, the statement said.

The LCU is 62.8 metres long, 11 metres wide and has a displacement of 830 tonnes, with a low draught of 1.7 metres, it said.

With an ability to attain a maximum speed of 15 knots, the ship can accommodate 216 personnel and is equipped with two indigenous CRN 91 guns to provide artillery fire support during landing operations, GRSE said.

The LCU Mark IV class of ships, the first of which was commissioned into the Navy in 2016, are fitted with close to 90 per cent indigenous equipment, the statement said.

The GRSE has so far manufactured 103 warships since its inception in 1960.
Warship builder GRSE hands over Landing Craft Utility amphibious ship to Indian Navy
 

Gautam

Team StratFront
Feb 16, 2019
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Tripura, NE, India
UNGA fallout: Turkish Company could be out of the FSS project for Indian Navy

The Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL)’s collaboration with M/s Anadolu Shipyard, Turkey for the FSS project estimated to cost of $ 2.3 billion is expected to be put on a hold.

Without citing any reason, speaking to Financial Express Online on condition of anonymity, a senior official confirmed that “The contract for the 45,000-ton fleet support ships (FSS) for the Indian Navy with the Turkish Company could be delayed.”

“It could be a fall out of Turkey cosying up to Pakistan and raising Kashmir issue at the recently concluded 74th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA),” said the officer.

It may be recalled that the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had raised the Kashmir issue and had criticised the international community for not paying attention to the situation. On the sidelines of the UNGA, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met with leaders of Turkey’s strong rivals and close neighbours –Cyprus, Armenia and Greece.

The Turkish Shipyard was L1 and had technically qualified for the FSS project for the Indian Navy from among three other global companies who were in the race for the construction of five ships. Seven global players had initially responded to the Request for Proposal — the German ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Fincantieri of Italy, Navantia from Spain, Rosboronexports (ROE) from Russia and Turkey’s Anadolu Shipyard. At the end of the scrutiny only three companies including TKMS, ROE and the Turkish Shipyard was shortlisted.

Though no contract has been inked yet as the analysis of the technical and financial assessment is going on, the Turkish shipyard as part of negotiations is expected to provide ship design, supply key machinery equipment (KME) and provide technical assistance.

On the completion of the evaluation, the second round of negotiations related to the price is on the agenda. This was the first time ever that a Turkish shipyardTurkish shipyard which is part of TAIS industrial group, participated in any defence contract in India.

HSL says the FSS project is on "hold" :

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Please cancel this project with the Turks. Ask HSL to find another partner or do it themselves.
 
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Gautam

Team StratFront
Feb 16, 2019
11,785
7,895
Tripura, NE, India
Some pics of IN LCU L-56 from Naval Dockyard, Visakhapatnam. The ship shall be based at Port Blair under Naval Component Commander, HQ Andaman & Nicobar Command.

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VAdm AK Jain FOCinC(E) to commission 6th Landing Craft Utility IN LCU L-56. The ship is sixth in series of eight being built by M/s Garden Reach Shipbuilders &Engineers Ltd. Kolkata & 100th warship fm M/s.GRSE.

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Aniruddha

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Oct 3, 2019
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Mumbai
Ok, so the contract has already been signed.

Any delivery timelines yet?
All 5 ships are expected to be completed by 2027.
My only fear with this deal is that HSL is involved in this project and that SBC is quite close to HSL where our nuclear submarines are built.
 

Ashwin

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Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle(DSRV) Complex inaugurated at Visakhapatnam by VAdm Atul Kumar Jain FOC-in-C ENC. The Complex accommodates newly inducted DSRV in a Rescue-Ready state.