Gautam

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KUNAL BISWAS

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Alpha Design Technology AKM Rifle Scope Tested At Firing Range By Indian Army​



Alpha Design Technology 4X Day And Night Optical Scope On AKM At 200-300 Meters Firing Range By Indian Army, 7.62 x 39mm AKM with 4X scope at 300m range, firing from kneeling position good grouping at target. The Indian Army Rifleman is both right & left handed, it is mandatory for them & it's part of their training.. #IndianArmy
 

AbRaj

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Dec 6, 2017
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I’m wondering What it takes to make such an aesthetically pleasing weapon.
Why can’t OFBs with thousands and thousands of employees taking government salaries, billions of rupees thrown every year and having a huge captive market in form of Indian tri services and almost all civilian arms market, still prefer to produce same old Bulgarian AK47 with stamped sheets and ugliest looking rivetings. Do they know anything about ergonomics of weapon systems?

Even Chinese have started to make very modern looking ARs,DMRs, SMGs and Sniper rifles recently. Their recent AR based rifle with full length pica tiny rails and ambidextrous charging handle looks very decent
@xxxxx
 
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Aditya b7777

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Nov 30, 2020
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I’m wondering What it takes to make such an aesthetically pleasing weapon.
Why can’t OFBs with thousands and thousands of employees taking government salaries, billions of rupees thrown every year and having a huge captive market in form of Indian tri services and almost all civilian arms market, still prefer to produce same old Bulgarian AK47 with stamped sheets and ugliest looking rivetings. Do they know anything about ergonomics of weapon systems?

Even Chinese have started to make very modern looking ARs,DMRs, SMGs and Sniper rifles recently. Their recent AR based rifle with full length pica tiny rails and ambidextrous charging handle looks very decent
@xxxxx
OFBs Bulgarian Inspired AK Family aka Trichy Assault Rifle(TAR) family use milled steel, so they lack rivets.
Also check this out, the new updated look of the ARDE 5.56x45mm CQB Carbine,
35DC8BE2-AD33-4034-8141-1837F4555EF8.jpeg

E9533050-5CEB-42CC-B5E5-F883E0808669.jpeg

6541DC1C-9F46-49A9-81DB-811B59C479D1.jpeg

Here’s the old look,
1641138926668.jpeg

Also it’s stated for production by private firms, not OFB.
 
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AbRaj

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OFBs Bulgarian Inspired AK Family aka Trichy Assault Rifle(TAR) family use milled steel, so they lack rivets.
Also check this out, the new updated look of the ARDE 5.56x45mm CQB Carbine,
View attachment 22381
View attachment 22382
View attachment 22386
Here’s the old look,
View attachment 22389
Also it’s stated for production by private firms, not OFB.
Looks like something designed in 80s. Still an improvement over WW2 era INSAS and it’s other ugly siblings.
Here is something designed in this decade
In China
7294AA19-719A-4697-8D8C-24CAA226D5F0.jpeg


changyong-zhao-qbz191-2.jpg


In Japan
images


In Finland

images
 
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Aditya b7777

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Nov 30, 2020
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Looks like something designed in 80s. Still an improvement over WW2 era INSAS and it’s other ugly siblings.
Here is something designed in this decade
In China
View attachment 22390

changyong-zhao-qbz191-2.jpg


In Japan
images


In Finland

images
What’s so revolutionary in the QBZ-191 vs the ARDE Carbine? Both have a full length top rail, small rail section in the 6 o’clock position and provision to mount a single rail section in the 3 and 9 o’clock positions? The only real difference is an adjustable stock the QBZ which doesn’t fold due to the buffer tube and a folding stock on the ARDE one, but an adjustable folding stock can be installed if required and an ambi fire selector, which the user did not ask for it in the GSQR for the CQB Carbine hence it wasn’t done, but we know they can due it based on the fact they’ve done it for JVPC and Amogh Carbine. There’s even a provision left for it on the gun which also doubles as the point for the folding stock to lock in place. Credits to Johny Baba on Other Forum for spotting this provision and the images as well as the text in them.
1641145095012.png
1641145405025.png

Same provision is also found on the Ishapore R2 7.62 NATO Rifle.
Only the DMR version of the QBZ 191 has a free floating barrel and MLOK handguard so I’m not counting that. Also I’m not getting into a comparison between the 5.56x45mm vs the 5.8x42mm cartridges as that’s not the point of this debate.
Its also quite obvious the rest of the firearms what you’ve mentioned are at another level compared to these 2 firearms in terms of appearance and external features.
 

AbRaj

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Dec 6, 2017
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What’s so revolutionary in the QBZ-191 vs the ARDE Carbine? Both have a full length top rail, small rail section in the 6 o’clock position and provision to mount a single rail section in the 3 and 9 o’clock positions? The only real difference is an adjustable stock the QBZ which doesn’t fold due to the buffer tube and a folding stock on the ARDE one, but an adjustable folding stock can be installed if required and an ambi fire selector, which the user did not ask for it in the GSQR for the CQB Carbine hence it wasn’t done, but we know they can due it based on the fact they’ve done it for JVPC and Amogh Carbine. There’s even a provision left for it on the gun. Credits to Johny Baba on Other Forum for spotting this provision and the images as well as the text in them.
View attachment 22391View attachment 22392
Same provision is also found on the Ishapore R2 7.62 NATO Rifle.
Only the DMR version of the QBZ 191 has a free floating barrel and MLOK handguard so I’m not counting that. Also I’m not getting into a comparison between the 5.56x45mm vs the 5.8x42mm cartridges as that’s not the point of this debate.
Its also quite obvious the rest of the firearms what you’ve mentioned are at another level compared to these 2 firearms in terms of appearance and external features.
I’m not talking about technicalities but simple fit, finish and other ergonomic features visible to a casual onlooker.
The former looks crudely designed and built and bulky weapons while the rest look much more sophisticated, better designed and built shiny weapons.
Maybe ARDE/OFB/Babus sitting at Icchapur don’t care or even IA don’t care these things. But to a common man who can only appreciate build quality of the products, it’s just a 4 kg of ugliness right there.
 

Aditya b7777

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Nov 30, 2020
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Karnataka

We have plenty of these Milan missiles,even French army failed to get a kill with Milan .
Milan is SALCOS(semi-automatic command to line-of-sight) guided, where the operator has to physically control the missile to guide it to the target with a small joystick like controls, there’s a thin wire which is connected to the missile from from the launcher for transmitting control inputs . Just because one missed doesn’t mean the system is junk. TOW missile, Konkurs, Bhaktar Shikan are all wire guided SALCOS missiles too.
It is obvious that Javelin would be much more accurate due to it being guided by a seeker. But it also costs much more, these SALCOS ATGMs are bloody cheap relatively so we can’t write them off.
 
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AbRaj

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Milan is SALCOS(semi-automatic command to line-of-sight) guided, where the operator has to physically control the missile to guide it to the target with a small joystick like controls, there’s a thin wire which is connected to the missile from from the launcher for transmitting control inputs . Just because one missed doesn’t mean the system is junk. TOW missile, Konkurs, Bhaktar Shikan are all wire guided SALCOS missiles too.
It is obvious that Javelin would be much more accurate due to it being guided by a seeker. But it also costs much more, these SALCOS ATGMs are bloody cheap relatively so we can’t write them off.
That explains why a lot of ATGMs move like dancing randomly while heading towards the target. Or it’s some kind of evasive manoeuvring to prevent possible interception ?
 

Hydra

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May 19, 2020
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Milan is SALCOS(semi-automatic command to line-of-sight) guided, where the operator has to physically control the missile to guide it to the target with a small joystick like controls, there’s a thin wire which is connected to the missile from from the launcher for transmitting control inputs . Just because one missed doesn’t mean the system is junk. TOW missile, Konkurs, Bhaktar Shikan are all wire guided SALCOS missiles too.
It is obvious that Javelin would be much more accurate due to it being guided by a seeker. But it also costs much more, these SALCOS ATGMs are bloody cheap relatively so we can’t write them off.
Have you seen the magnitude of that explosion, it is obviously not from Javelin's warhead alone, the explosives in that truck is responsible for that huge explosion. If they couldnot have javelin at that point of time, they all could have perished. At critical time we need a weapon which as reliable like a Japanese or German petrol car. Javelin is such a weapon & Milan is not.
 

Aditya b7777

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Nov 30, 2020
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Have you seen the magnitude of that explosion, it is obviously not from Javelin's warhead alone, the explosives in that truck is responsible for that huge explosion. If they couldnot have javelin at that point of time, they all could have perished. At critical time we need a weapon which as reliable like a Japanese or German petrol car. Javelin is such a weapon & Milan is not.
And that is exactly why the Nag Missile Family and MPATGM have been created. These SALCOS ATGMs are still very much useful for large scale ATGM attacks where numbers are required for saturation and is not feasible to depend only on ATGMs with seekers. Hence even the US Army still hasn’t replaced SALCOS and has started purchasing unguided Rocket Launchers/RCLs like the Carl Gustaf rather than the Javelin replacing the M72 LAW, AT4 and TOW, what they’ve done with the CG is to add an FCS with and LRF and Ballistic Computer to the RCL to improve accuracy by giving an approximate ideal targeting area and increase the range slightly and increase the likelihood of a hit even for moving vehicles.
 
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AbRaj

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Army-Sniper-Top.jpg
Army Green Berets Brought Out Their Newest Sniper Rifle For A Celebrity Shoot-Off​

Army Green Berets first began receiving their new Advanced Sniper Rifles last year and conventional units are now set to get versions of these guns.​

BY BRETT TINGLEY AND JOSEPH TREVITHICK JANUARY 4, 2022


One of Barrett's Mk 22 Mod 0 Advanced Sniper Rifles, the U.S. special operations community's newest sniper rifle, has made one of its first public appearances at a recent Celebrity Tactical Challenge held at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. While most of the official photos from the event show individuals firing Glock pistols and AR-15/M16 pattern carbines in typical configurations used by Army special operations forces, one set of images shows actor Mark Valley firing a Mk 22. The first of these guns only began heading to operational Army Special Forces units last year.
The 2021 Celebrity Tactical Challenge took place at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School's (JFKSWCS) Miller Training Complex on December 16, 2021, but the Army just released photos from it today. Mark Valley, best known for his role on the television show Boston Legal and who also played a C-130 pilot in the 2012 film Zero Dark Thirty, a dramatization of the hunt for and ultimate killing of Osama Bin Laden at his compound in Pakistan in 2011, was one of twelve celebrities who took part.
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US ARMY
Mark Valley fires a Mk 22 Mod 0 sniper rifle during the 2021 Celebrity Tactical Challenge at Fort Bragg.
The full list of competitors was as follows:
  • Mark Valley, a television and movie actor.
  • Shawn Johnson, a gymnast who won gold and silver medals at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China.
  • Andrew East, a long snapper who played for multiple different NFL teams between 2015 and 2019, and who is married to Johnson.
  • Chuck Wicks, a country music singer, and his wife Kasi.
  • Ryan Bader, a Bellator Mixed Martial Arts champion.
  • Eric Decker, a wide receiver who played in the NFL for multiple teams between 2010 and 2017.
  • Tulsi Gabbard, a former Democratic Party Representative to Congress from Hawaii and a current member of the U.S. Army Reserve.
  • Charles Esten, an actor and country musician best known for his role on the television show Nashville.
  • Shawn Booth, the finalist on the 11th season of the reality show The Bachelorette.
  • Dan Henderson, a mixed martial arts fighter.
  • Jacob Heppner, a top competitor at the CrossFit Games.
Two Army Special Forces soldiers, better known as Green Berets, competed in the shooting challenges, as well. This year’s event was the second annual shoot-off and raised money for the Special Forces Charitable Trust, a charity that supports Green Berets and their families.
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US ARMY
Olympic medal-winning gymnast Shawn Johnson fires an AR-15/M16-type carbine during the 2021 Celebrity Tactical Challenge at Fort Bragg.
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US ARMY
Retired NFL player Andrew East fires a Glock pistol during the 2021 Celebrity Tactical Challenge.
The Army released two pictures of Valley, who is also a former U.S. Army first lieutenant who served in Operation Desert Storm as part of the 18th Engineer Brigade, firing the Mk 22. This rifle is a variant of the Barrett Multi-Role Adaptive Design (MRAD) precision rifle developed specifically for the U.S. special operations community. U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) chose this version of the MRAD as the winner of its Advanced Sniper Rifle (ASR) competition in 2019.

The ASR program, which was first announced in 2017, sought to acquire a rifle featuring modular parts that could be easily and rapidly reconfigured to fire either 7.62x51mm NATO, .300 Norma Magnum, or .338 Norma Magnum ammunition as necessary. Barrett MRAD is a modular design that the company offers for sale to civilian and government customers, in eight different calibers in total, as well as in a host of different configurations. SOCOM's Mk 22s come with Nightforce 7-35×56 scopes and Barrett's own AML 338 suppressors and have various accessory attachment points for additional aiming devices and other accessories, among other features.

SOCOM's decision to adopt a version of the MRAD came relatively soon after it had fielded another new sniper rifle, known as the Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR). Those rifles, a variant of the Remington Modular Sniper Rifle (MSR) also known as the Mk 21 Mod 0, were designed to fill the same general role as the ASR and could be converted to any of the same three calibers. The MSR had notably beaten out the MRAD in the PSR competition in 2013.
For reasons that are still not entirely clear, SOCOM subsequently decided to curtail purchases of the Mk 21 Mod 0, and launch the ASR competition. Remington again submitted an MSR-based rifle, but then lost to Barrett's entry.

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
The Remington MSR.
The U.S. Army has since made a similar decision to adopt its own variant of the MRAD to replace its own Remington sniper rifles, from which the MSR was derived and that are designed M2010s. The configuration of the rifles that conventional Army snipers will eventually receive is expected to be slightly different, including using a different scope made by Leupold. The weapons are also confusing being referred to as Mk 22 Precision Sniper Rifles (PSR).
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US ARMY
An Army sniper in Afghanistan armed with an M2010 rifle.
The Army confirmed in September 2021 that Mk 22 Mod 0s had begun to enter service with its special operations units and that snipers from the 82nd Airborne Division had been training with those units on these rifles ahead of the arrival of their own guns. The service hopes conventional units will begin receiving the first of their versions of this rifle in February of this year.
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US ARMY
Army special operators train with Mk 22s at Fort Bragg.
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US ARMY
A member of the 82nd Airborne Division behind the trigger of a Mk 22.
What the reason or reasons were why SOCOM and the U.S. Army have decided to transition away from their Remington sniper rifles to the Barrett Mk 22 pattern, these new guns already look to be seeing increasing use in the special operations community just months after the start of their official fielding. They already appear commonplace enough that they can be turned over to celebrities for casual shooting competitions.
Contact the author: [email protected]

 
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