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Question is, are we going for 7.62x39 just because we already have it and the logistical transition (at least for RR) could be cheaper? Or because the x39 has genuine advantages in the kind of operations RR conducts, which makes it better than a 5.56x45 (.223) or 7.62x51 (.308)?

Did RR try out 308 to entertain the idea of whether they can look at throwing away the x39?

My guess is that RR is not ready to let the x39 go. And chances are, Assam Rifles won't be, either. But it needs to be seen if a modern .308/.223 rifle can't be a good replacement for all AKs in the Army. Because let's face it - the only experience the Army has at large with a 5.56 AR is the INSAS and the only .308 experience is with the older SLRs...neither of which are full-auto rifles. I'm not surprised if some units would prefer the AK over them.

But a modern assault rifle (Excalibur for 5.56 and a foreign 308 like the Galil ACE or Tavor 7AR) is a completely different deal. Is it wise for RR/AR to stick with x39 rifles (albeit could be modernized AKs) over these beasts and all the logistical & economic benefits it could bring?

As I said, I wouldn't call it a nightmare if Army has 3 calibers of assault rifles as standard-issue. But it does raise the question if such a diversity in logistics is actually warranted or not?

7.62x51 is not fit for firing in close combat situations. In close combat situations where mobility is required, the heavier round will reduce the ammunition that is carryable and also increase recoil. But it is ideal where ammunition shortage is not a problem like in border outposts

7.62x39 is good for close combat with obstacles like forest, urban areas etc. The round penetrates barriers more easily whereas 5.56x45 loses most of its energy on even hitting a small branch.

5.56x45 is good for combat in open ranges as the round has flatter trajectory and lower recoil.


7.62x51 is unlikely to be a round that is carried by mobile soldiers but as LMG only. In this manner, the rounds required will be 3 but in effect only 2 when needed in mobility
 

Shashank

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Assault Rifles, Carbine Procurement – Israel could be best source - Northlines

Media headlines on January 17 read “13 yrs after requst, Army to get 1.6 lakh rifles, carbines”. The Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) headed by the Defence Minister, has cleared fast-track procurement of 72,400 assault rifles and 93,850 carbines for Rs 3,547 cr from the global market. According to PTI, tenders will soon be floated while procurement could also bedone on government to government basis.
Approval for these limited emergency purchases come after repeated scrapping of tenders, mainly because of allegations of graft, as well as DRDO’s inability to provide state-of-the-art small arms over almost two decades. These purchases are to be followed by a larger ‘Make in India’ project for equipping the Army including 382 infantry battalions and 63 Rashtriya Rifles battalions.
With respect to ‘Make in India’, ‘Make II’ category of the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP), MoD can accept suo motu proposals from the industry and also allow start-ups to develop equipment for the military. Vendors meeting the relaxed eligibility criteria are allowed to participate in prototype development without the need to submit Detailed Project Report. After accord of approval of the ‘Make II’ project by the DAC, all clearances are to be accorded at Service HQ level.
The saga of new assault rifles actually began 18 years ago in 1980 when 17 x 5.56mm rifles from 11 countries were imported by MoD to equip three Para Commando battalions and three Para Battalions. Despite successful trials and money kept reserved in the 6th Army Plan, red tape blocked imports, giving these 17 weapons to DRDO who took 15 years to produce the 5.56 INSAS rifle that was nowhere close to top 10 assault rifles of the world.
The IPKF went to Sri Lanka in 1987 armed with the unwieldy 7.62 SLR rifles battling the LTTE armed with AK 47 assault rifles. Eventually, Army had to import 1,00,000 AK 47 rifles (then costing only US$ 300 apiece) to give 100 per infantry battalion in the IPKF.
In May 2015, the RFP for the assault rifles was scrapped by MoD, forcing the Army in September 2016 to re-launch its global hunt for around 2,00,000 new-generation 7.62mm x 51mm assault rifles after similar bids over last decade were shelved on various grounds including corruption. In 2016, the MoD also scrapped tender issued in 2010 for 44,618 close-quarter battle carbines, in which too IWI of Israel had emerged as “resultant single-vendor” over Italian firm Beretta, amid allegations of irregularities and political intrigue. Significantly, the Army had issued a global tender in 2008 (nine years ago) to replace the 1944 vintage British-era carbines but the ensuing cycle has brought all efforts to nought.
In 2011, another tender was floated for direct acquisition of 65,000 new generation assault rifles for the Army costing Rs 4,848 cr to equip 120 infantry battalions. Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) was to then manufacture over 1,13,000 such rifles through JV with the foreign vendor providing ToT. The rifle was to weigh around 3.5 kg with advanced night-vision, holographic reflex sights, laser designators, detachable under-barrel grenade launchers etc.
However, since the DRDO’s ‘Excalibur’ had only some cosmetic changed to the original INSAS, it too failed in the trials undertaken by the Army. Now the whole process for procuring an assault rifle for the Army has started once again. Media had been mischievously touting that Army had planned to procure some 800,000 state-of-the-art assault rifles from the global market, each costing about Rs 200,000; that would have cost about Rs 16,000 crore – significantly more than what the Army can afford. But this is grossly incorrect since Army had all along planned to procure around 2,00,000 assault rifles, not 8,00,000.
In fact, only 65,000 (costing Rs 4,848 cr) were to be imported and 1,13,000 were to be manufactured by OFB. Had this been pursued in 2011, Army’s 140 infantry battalions would have already been equipped and balance in the process through a JV.
This time the Defence Minister appears genuinely pushing to rectify this long outstanding criticality of soldiers at the cutting edge. Government is also facing public pressure with editorials in national daily citing unhappiness of the Army for multiple reasons including non-provisioning of a reliable rifle. Over the years, opinions in the Army have varied between the 5.56mm calibre, the 7.62mm x 51mm calibre, rifle with exchangeable barrels for firing different caliber ammunition, and the like. There were also recent reports that Army is going in for equipping infantry soldiers (not all) with a world-class assault rifle, while non-infantry soldiers would get a cheaper, “less effective”, indigenous rifle.
There is no doubt that whatever decisions the Army takes is after detailed thought. At the same time, there is no denying that the AK Assault Rifles are no stoppage weapons, easy on maintenance and a double strapped magazine gives the soldier advantage of 60 rounds of ammunition readily available. It is for this reason that terrorist are using AK Assault Rifles globally, and it is for this very reason that our soldiers deployed on the Saltoro Range in Siachen keep an AK Assault Rifle next to the service issues INSAS rifle because the latter may have stoppages at the critical moment, but the AK won’t.
The only problem with the AK Assault Rifle was that it was sans night sight, which was a major disadvantage. But now an Indian start-up, Aerodef Solutions Pvt Ltd, is providing just that capability and is already in the process of upgrading AK Assault Rifles for Northern Command under the Army Commander’s Financial Powers.
The Thermal Imaging Weapon Sight is a light combat scope that has: user selectable NTSC or PAL format; intuitive drop-down user interface; 1x, 2x, 4x and 8x digital e-zoom; white hot, black hot, rainbow and other colour modes; six onboard digitally controlled reticle patterns; reticle colours in black, white, red and cyan; extended operation time with optional external battery power supply; optional video recorder with onboard replay; wireless remote control for tactical operations; waterproof CNC machined aircraft-aluminum alloy construction; rapid start-up; MIL-STD-1913 (Picatinny Rail) quick-release mount, and; shuttered eye-guard to prevent facial display backlash and maintain light security.
Characteristics of the Multifunctional Thermal Imaging Mini Monocular are: weight 240g; MIL-810G rugged, waterproof reinforced fiber glass construction; fast F1:1 19mm front germanium lens; 800×600 organic LED display; drop-down menu and icon based menu; intuitive three button control; polarity control (black hot / white hot); colour and monochrome palettes; digital zoom up to 8x; integrated digital compass; integrated laser pointer and digital inclinometer; NYSC/PAL field switchable video output; adaptable to wide selection of head, helmet, and weapon mounts with quick rail / dove tail / bayonet interfaces; < 3 sec fast time to image, and; one CR123 battery operation.
The Night Vision Clip On System comprises: quick conversion of daytime scope, sight or binocular to night vision; mounts in front of riflescope with no re-zeroing required; equipped with wireless remote control; variable gain control; XLR-IR850D detachable X Long-range IR Illuminator; single alkaline 1.5V AA or 3V CR 123A lithium battery; quick release mount and; mil standard compliant.
The Army and the MoD could seriously examine the AK series of assault rifles, which being lightweight could well be used as carbine too. The question of UBGL will remain, whether it can be fitted on the AK or another weapon (one or two in a section) will be required, which needs to be examined. But need of the hour is cut down the red-tape and elaborate procedures. Suggesting Israel as the best source (title of the heading) may be considered déjà vu, with opposition parties crying blue murder, but procurements in the past have taken place with single vendor. However, in case of small arms procurement, on two-occasions in the past scrapping of tenders occurred because IWI of Israel emerging as “resultant single vendor”.
Depending on the Army decision, the shortest procurement action could be government-to-government deal between India and Israel. Quick emergent procurement followed a JV under Make in India would be the best course.
 

Parthu

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Replying to your question in a more appropriate thread.

Just for the my knowledge - the side rails and clamps on previous ACH helmets are all bolted now correct?

Yes.

and this new visor - looks like it is clamped on and easily be used in the MKUs Helmets yes? advantage of such a setup is that the helmet integrity isn't lost

That's right. Although these particular models are imported from Mili-Tech, MKU itself makes a similar solution that is useful across the board for ACH-spec helmets. This solution is the Multiple Accessory Connector System (MACS). Read about it here: Multiple Accessory Connector System (MACS) | Personal Protection | Ballistic Helmet | Helmet Accessories - MKU

hell.png
 
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Parthu

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So we can expect Israeli rifle, carbine and LMG.

But what about the sniper rifle? @Parthu, any idea? Barrett?

Have heard absolutely nothing regarding the sniper rifle procurement since the day the requirement for .338 SRs was announced.

I would certainly be okay with either the Barrett MRAD or the IWI DAN-338...but from what I know, we have not narrowed down our choices just yet (if we did, they didn't tell us about it). The RFIs were originally sent to these companies:

ArmaLite (US)
Barrett Firearms (US)
Blaser Jagdwaffen (Germany)
Kalashnikov Concern (Russia)
Steyr Mannlicher (Austria)
PGM Precision (France)
IWI (Israel)
SIG Sauer (US)
KBP Instrument Design Bureau (Russia)
Nexter Arms (France)

The potential offerings from these companies would probably have been as follows:

ArmaLite -- AR-30A1
armalite-ar-30-a1-hornady-338-lapua-mainpic.jpg


Barrett -- MRAD (Multi-Role Adaptive Design) or M98B
barrett_98B_fieldcraft_rifle.jpg


Blaser -- R93 LRS2 Tactical
1200px-Blaser_R93_LRS2_.308_Win_4thNovSniperCompetition06.jpg


Kalashnikov/Izhmash -- VSV-338 (was introduced only few months before RFI was out), or the older SV-338
VSV-338_sniper_rifle_at_Military-technical_forum_ARMY-2016_01.jpg


Steyr -- SSG 08 (.338LM version)
tzeIA5a.jpg


PGM Precision -- PGM338
15202358406_fb1fe6d7f8_b.jpg


IWI -- DAN 338
dan338-sniper-daesh.jpg


SIG -- RTAC2-H27B-338
SIG_Sauer_RTAC2_H27_B_338.jpg


^^ One of these bolt-action weapons is likely to become the Indian Army's future standard sniper rifle, replacing the SVD (which is pretty much a semi-auto DMR anyway).

I didn't know back then (and don't know now) what sniper system in .338 calibre is available from either KBP (including subsidiary TsKIB SOO) or Nexter - because I can't find any, and I can't figure out why we sent solicitations to these companies which don't have any offering in the required category. This is like sending an RFI for twin-engined jet fighter to Pilatus.
 

Parthu

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via INDRA Networks

Soldiers from Assam Regiment with INSAS-1B...this particular model has been modified to incorporate a vertical foregrip. As per INDRA, this is a mod done at the personal/battalion/regimental level - according to the comfort & recommendation of the individual/unit.

27973524_1106242002850816_1660924885577695219_n.jpg


@Abingdonboy @randomradio @Hellfire @Milspec @Ashwin @GuardianRED
 

GuardianRED

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Dec 2, 2017
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Soldiers from Assam Regiment with INSAS-1B...this particular model has been modified to incorporate a vertical foregrip. As per INDRA, this is a mod done at the personal/battalion/regimental level - according to the comfort & recommendation of the individual/unit.

27973524_1106242002850816_1660924885577695219_n.jpg


@Abingdonboy @randomradio @Hellfire @Milspec @Ashwin @GuardianRED
"And I even Like the Colour"

latest



the Mods are interesting - hard to say that is it is aftermarket fore grip or they had it fabricated!
 

Himanshu

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Dec 3, 2017
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indopacfront.blogspot.com
REQUEST FOR INFORMATION POST AoN : ASSAULT RIFLE FOR ARMED FORCES

7.62mm x 51mm rifle

(a) Quantity. 5.5 Lacs (Approx). (b) Category. ‘Buy and Make (Indian)’ with ‘Buy’ component as ‘Nil’.

Tentative date of issue of RFP is 31 Mar 2018.

Lethality at ranges up to minimum 500 meters in terms of wound profile, energy transferred and penetration.
The rifle should be capable of achieving accuracy better than three Minutes of Angle up to a range of minimum 500 meters.

https://indianarmy.nic.in/writereaddata/RFI/556/RFI ASSAULT RIFLE 220218 .pdf


REQUEST FOR INFORMATION POST AoN : SNIPER RIFLE FOR INDIAN ARMED FORCES

Quantity. (i) Sniper Rifle. 6,000 Sniper Rifles alongwith Telescopic Sight and accessories. (ii) Ammunition (8.6 mm). Quantity 1,00,00,000 rounds (Buy- 50% rounds and Make 50% rounds) (b) Categorisation. - Buy and Make (i) Qty 6,000 Sniper Rifles with Qty 50% rounds(8.6 mm) of ammunition - Buy (ii) Qty 50% rounds(8.6mm) - Make with ToT to OFB & Indian industry.

Effective Range. Not less than 1200 metres. (c) Accuracy. Less than equal to one MoA. (d) Muzzle Velocity. Not more than 800 m/s. (e) Operating Mechanism. Bolt Action.

https://indianarmy.nic.in/writereaddata/RFI/555/RFI Sniper Rif 220218.pdf
 
Last edited:

Parthu

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This puts a lot of the ongoing/upcoming competitions (and the potential competitors for each of those requirements) into a certain perspective, thanks to the weight limitations being made clear. This also shows that the initial RFIs for assault rifles & sniper rifles were simply casting a wide net by specifying the weight as "light as possible". This here Technology Perspective & Capability Roadmap (TPCR) document provides a more concrete, comprehensive look at the actual limitations.

What follows are a compilation of my assessment of what I think could be the potential offerings on the market in these categories, starting off with the AMR (Anti-Material Rifle) weighing less than 12 kgs in 12.7mm calibre...of note is the fact that they only mention the diameter of the round and not the length, this signifies that they are open to both Western-style 12.7x99mm (.50 BMG) as well as Russian 12.7x108mm calibres. Eventhough there are no potential rifles I could foresee in this compilation that are anything other than the .50 BMG -

Barrett M95
beauty-model95.jpg


McMillan Firearms TAC-50A1
50bmg-6.jpg


SIG Sauer SIG50 (basically a SIG-made TAC-50 with certain changes)
SIG50-Left.jpg


Gepard GM6 Lynx
GM6_1.jpg


Desert Tech HTI (Hard Target Interdiction) - probably one of the lightest (if not the lightest) AMR in .50BMG around
desert-tech-hti-50-bmg.png



A somewhat more tricky thing to acquire could be:

DSR-Precision DSR-50
maxresdefault.jpg


There is also the XM500 from Barrett, reportedly still in development though news regarding it is scarce. Given the unclear timeline (or availability) of this rifle, most likely it won't be offered. But it serves to know it exists:
Barrett_XM500.jpg


++++

I had already listed the possible contenders for the 8.6mm (.338 Lapua Magnum) calibre sniper rifle requirement in this post: Small Arms & Tactical Equipment

++++

The requirement for a Carbine, being asked in the 5.56x30mm calibre, is pretty much tailor-made for the OFB-manufactured Amogh and/or the JVPC (Joint Venture Protective Carbine):

AMOGH_-_Carbine.JPG

Amogh

DL1X-6GWkAA0T8w.jpg

JVPC

++++

Coming to the all-important 7.62x51mm ( .308 ) assault rifle requirement....previously, there were many speculations on forum & in social media regarding potential competitors, including guns like:

SIG Sauer SIG716
Colt CM901 (Colt Modular Carbine)
FN Herstal SCAR-H
IWI ACE 52
IWI Tavor 7 AR
Beretta Firearms ARX-200
SIG Sauer SG 751

However, given the now-evident weight restriction of being less than 4 kgs (unloaded, presumably) , the IWI Tavor 7 AR, Colt CM901 and the SIG716 Patrol rifles are effectively ruled out. There is however, the off-chance that at least the Tavor 7, not yet being in mass production, can yet undergo a weight-reduction of approximately 100 or so grams, provided IWI is intent on entering this rifle in the Indian competition.

On the other hand...this new information presents the ACE 52 (or the ACE 53 with the longer barrel), also from IWI, as the most likely winner in the .308 requirement for some 250,000 rifles.

@randomradio @Abingdonboy @Hellfire @Milspec @Harsh Bardhan @Levina @GuardianRED @Shashank @Aashish
 

Milspec

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This puts a lot of the ongoing/upcoming competitions (and the potential competitors for each of those requirements) into a certain perspective, thanks to the weight limitations being made clear. This also shows that the initial RFIs for assault rifles & sniper rifles were simply casting a wide net by specifying the weight as "light as possible". This here Technology Perspective & Capability Roadmap (TPCR) document provides a more concrete, comprehensive look at the actual limitations.

What follows are a compilation of my assessment of what I think could be the potential offerings on the market in these categories, starting off with the AMR (Anti-Material Rifle) weighing less than 12 kgs in 12.7mm calibre...of note is the fact that they only mention the diameter of the round and not the length, this signifies that they are open to both Western-style 12.7x99mm (.50 BMG) as well as Russian 12.7x108mm calibres. Eventhough there are no potential rifles I could foresee in this compilation that are anything other than the .50 BMG -

Barrett M95
beauty-model95.jpg


McMillan Firearms TAC-50A1
50bmg-6.jpg


SIG Sauer SIG50 (basically a SIG-made TAC-50 with certain changes)
SIG50-Left.jpg


Gepard GM6 Lynx
GM6_1.jpg


Desert Tech HTI (Hard Target Interdiction) - probably one of the lightest (if not the lightest) AMR in .50BMG around
desert-tech-hti-50-bmg.png



A somewhat more tricky thing to acquire could be:

DSR-Precision DSR-50
maxresdefault.jpg


There is also the XM500 from Barrett, reportedly still in development though news regarding it is scarce. Given the unclear timeline (or availability) of this rifle, most likely it won't be offered. But it serves to know it exists:
Barrett_XM500.jpg


++++

I had already listed the possible contenders for the 8.6mm (.338 Lapua Magnum) calibre sniper rifle requirement in this post: Small Arms & Tactical Equipment

++++

The requirement for a Carbine, being asked in the 5.56x30mm calibre, is pretty much tailor-made for the OFB-manufactured Amogh and/or the JVPC (Joint Venture Protective Carbine):

AMOGH_-_Carbine.JPG

Amogh

DL1X-6GWkAA0T8w.jpg

JVPC

++++

Coming to the all-important 7.62x51mm ( .308 ) assault rifle requirement....previously, there were many speculations on forum & in social media regarding potential competitors, including guns like:

SIG Sauer SIG716
Colt CM901 (Colt Modular Carbine)
FN Herstal SCAR-H
IWI ACE 52
IWI Tavor 7 AR
Beretta Firearms ARX-200
SIG Sauer SG 751

However, given the now-evident weight restriction of being less than 4 kgs (unloaded, presumably) , the IWI Tavor 7 AR, Colt CM901 and the SIG716 Patrol rifles are effectively ruled out. There is however, the off-chance that at least the Tavor 7, not yet being in mass production, can yet undergo a weight-reduction of approximately 100 or so grams, provided IWI is intent on entering this rifle in the Indian competition.

On the other hand...this new information presents the ACE 52 (or the ACE 53 with the longer barrel), also from IWI, as the most likely winner in the .308 requirement for some 250,000 rifles.

@randomradio @Abingdonboy @Hellfire @Milspec @Harsh Bardhan @Levina @GuardianRED @Shashank @Aashish

I am big fan of the 7.62x51 Nato Round, So much so that I recently acquired another rifle chambered in the caliber, but for the Indian Army in my opinion this is a very counterproductive selection which will set back the forces another 20 years or so.
With the MICWS being offered in a 6.8SPC, I was hoping for IA to finally adopt a modern optimized cartridge but at the end of the day it is going back to the .308 round which has surpassed it's prime. 6.5 grendel in my opinion would have been the prime candidate for the Indian Assault Rifle initiative.
 
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How can a cartridge surpass its prime? Show me any country that uses the 6.8 cartridge?
I am big fan of the 7.62x51 Nato Round, So much so that I recently acquired another rifle chambered in the caliber, but for the Indian Army in my opinion this is a very counterproductive selection which will set back the forces another 20 years or so.
With the MICWS being offered in a 6.8SPC, I was hoping for IA to finally adopt a modern optimized cartridge but at the end of the day it is going back to the .308 round which has surpassed it's prime. 6.5 grendel in my opinion would have been the prime candidate for the Indian Assault Rifle initiative.
 

GuardianRED

Call Sign "RED"
Dec 2, 2017
518
414
This puts a lot of the ongoing/upcoming competitions (and the potential competitors for each of those requirements) into a certain perspective, thanks to the weight limitations being made clear. This also shows that the initial RFIs for assault rifles & sniper rifles were simply casting a wide net by specifying the weight as "light as possible". This here Technology Perspective & Capability Roadmap (TPCR) document provides a more concrete, comprehensive look at the actual limitations.

What follows are a compilation of my assessment of what I think could be the potential offerings on the market in these categories, starting off with the AMR (Anti-Material Rifle) weighing less than 12 kgs in 12.7mm calibre...of note is the fact that they only mention the diameter of the round and not the length, this signifies that they are open to both Western-style 12.7x99mm (.50 BMG) as well as Russian 12.7x108mm calibres. Eventhough there are no potential rifles I could foresee in this compilation that are anything other than the .50 BMG -

Barrett M95
beauty-model95.jpg


McMillan Firearms TAC-50A1
50bmg-6.jpg


SIG Sauer SIG50 (basically a SIG-made TAC-50 with certain changes)
SIG50-Left.jpg


Gepard GM6 Lynx
GM6_1.jpg


Desert Tech HTI (Hard Target Interdiction) - probably one of the lightest (if not the lightest) AMR in .50BMG around
desert-tech-hti-50-bmg.png



A somewhat more tricky thing to acquire could be:

DSR-Precision DSR-50
maxresdefault.jpg


There is also the XM500 from Barrett, reportedly still in development though news regarding it is scarce. Given the unclear timeline (or availability) of this rifle, most likely it won't be offered. But it serves to know it exists:
Barrett_XM500.jpg


++++

I had already listed the possible contenders for the 8.6mm (.338 Lapua Magnum) calibre sniper rifle requirement in this post: Small Arms & Tactical Equipment

++++

The requirement for a Carbine, being asked in the 5.56x30mm calibre, is pretty much tailor-made for the OFB-manufactured Amogh and/or the JVPC (Joint Venture Protective Carbine):

AMOGH_-_Carbine.JPG

Amogh

DL1X-6GWkAA0T8w.jpg

JVPC

++++

Coming to the all-important 7.62x51mm ( .308 ) assault rifle requirement....previously, there were many speculations on forum & in social media regarding potential competitors, including guns like:

SIG Sauer SIG716
Colt CM901 (Colt Modular Carbine)
FN Herstal SCAR-H
IWI ACE 52
IWI Tavor 7 AR
Beretta Firearms ARX-200
SIG Sauer SG 751

However, given the now-evident weight restriction of being less than 4 kgs (unloaded, presumably) , the IWI Tavor 7 AR, Colt CM901 and the SIG716 Patrol rifles are effectively ruled out. There is however, the off-chance that at least the Tavor 7, not yet being in mass production, can yet undergo a weight-reduction of approximately 100 or so grams, provided IWI is intent on entering this rifle in the Indian competition.

On the other hand...this new information presents the ACE 52 (or the ACE 53 with the longer barrel), also from IWI, as the most likely winner in the .308 requirement for some 250,000 rifles.

@randomradio @Abingdonboy @Hellfire @Milspec @Harsh Bardhan @Levina @GuardianRED @Shashank @Aashish

Just noticed this ...

The DSR-50 has 2 Mags loaded? or ???
 

Parthu

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I am big fan of the 7.62x51 Nato Round, So much so that I recently acquired another rifle chambered in the caliber, but for the Indian Army in my opinion this is a very counterproductive selection which will set back the forces another 20 years or so.
With the MICWS being offered in a 6.8SPC, I was hoping for IA to finally adopt a modern optimized cartridge but at the end of the day it is going back to the .308 round which has surpassed it's prime. 6.5 grendel in my opinion would have been the prime candidate for the Indian Assault Rifle initiative.

I agree with your view that an intermediate round somewhere between .223 and .308 might be the holy grail post-2020...however with regard to why Army switched back to 308 from the 6.8x43mm, I'm thinking maybe they thought it was too much of a risk? They could not put aside the fact that they now had to rely on OFB & ARDE to not only prove a new rifle, but prove it with essentially a new calibre: one chambered for which there aren't many options to acquire even on the international market.

Even then, with the way Army's requirements are changing, the current 308 too might not be something set in stone yet. I've come to expect that from the Army and MoD.

How can a cartridge surpass its prime? Show me any country that uses the 6.8 cartridge?

The future US Army service rifle program (NGSW) seeks a cartridge in precisely this range (more powerful than the 5.56, but lighter than the 7.62). NGSW is meant to be M4 replacement.

Cartridges that buck the trend aren't impossible to adopt on a large scale...look at Chinese PLA's QBZ-95 chambered for 5.8x42mm.

Just noticed this ...

The DSR-50 has 2 Mags loaded? or ???

The one in front is a spare magazine holder. Yes it's meant to hold a 2nd loaded magazine, for potentially faster reloading.