Renewable energy in India : News & Updates

Gautam

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2.2 Gigawatt Solar Park In India’s Rajasthan State Now Fully Operational

March 30th, 2020 by Saurabh

With the completion of a 300 megawatt solar power project, India has completed its largest solar power park
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One of India’s leading private renewable energy companies, Hero Future Energies, recently commissioned a 300 megawatt solar power project at Bhadla solar power park in Rajasthan. With this project, the solar park is now complete with installed capacity of 2,245 megawatts.

Bhadla solar park is significant in many aspects. The solar park saw multiple record-low tariffs during some highly competitive auctions. Projects at the solar park were developed by multiple companies through public-private partnership.

State government itself developed 745 megawatts of capacity, a joint venture company of IL&FS and Rajasthan government developed 1 gigawatt of capacity, while another joint venture between Adani Enterprises and Rajasthan government developed 500 megawatts.

The park hosts 260 megawatts owned by India’s largest power generation company — the state-owned NTPC Limited.

In May 2017, two separate auctions of 250 megawatts and 500 megawatts paved way for the lowest-ever tariff bid for a solar power project in India. The first auction saw a bid of Rs 2.62/kWh (US¢4.1/kWh), the lowest at that time. This bid was 9.2% lower than the previous lowest bid in India. Within two days the record of Rs 2.62/kWh was shattered by Acme Cleantech Solutions. The company secured 200 megawatts of capacity in the 500 megawatt auction at Rs 2.44/kWh (US¢3.8/kWh). This remains the lowest-ever solar power bid in India to date.

In December 2019, another 750 megawatts of capacity was auctioned. Tariff bids increased marginally to Rs 2.47/kWh (US¢3.8/kWh).

SB Energy, a joint venture of SoftBank, Foxconn and Bharti Enterprises, possibly owns the largest capacity in the park at 600 megawatts, secured across three auctions. Other major developers with projects at this solar park include ReNew Power, Acme Solar Holdings, Hero Future Energies, and Azure Power.

2.2 Gigawatt Solar Park In India’s Rajasthan State Now Fully Operational | CleanTechnica
 
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Gautam

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India has enough limestone to help coal-based thermal power plants meet the new emission norms, says CSE’s new report

Study on flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems refutes thermal power industry’s contention that the country does not have enough limestone :
  • Limestone is needed for operating flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems in thermal power plants. FGD systems help control emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from these plants. Coal-based thermal power plants have to meet new emission norms by 2022.
  • India is the largest emitter of SO2 in the world. Thermal power plants account for 45 per cent of total industrial emissions of SO2 in the country. FGD systems in thermal power plants can reduce SO2 emissions from them by 80 per cent.
  • FGD gypsum, the by-product in the FGD process, can help India meet some of the shortfall in its output of gypsum.
  • Report recommends setting up guidelines on handling, storage, transportation, quality control etc of limestone and gypsum. It also offers suggestions on use of FGD gypsum in sectors such as cement production and high end gypsum products like wall boards and plaster boards.
1585679436502.png


New Delhi, March 31, 2020: India has enough reserves of limestone to enable thermal power plants to install flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems by 2022 in order to meet the new emission norms for the sector, says a new report released online here by Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). This refutes the contention of power plants, which have been trying to delay implementation of the norms by -- among other things -- raising concerns about availability of limestone and use of its byproduct, FGD gypsum.

To meet India’s new emission norms by 2022, a large number of coal-based thermal power plants have to install FGD systems. Limestone is a key raw material in most FGD systems for controlling sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Flue gas desulphurization – limestone availability and gypsum use, as the CSE report is titled, attempts to examine the issue of availability of limestone for FGD.

Said Sunita Narain, director general, CSE: “Many thermal power companies have been raising various concerns regarding FGD installation; one of these is about the availability of limestone, and the use or disposal of FGD gypsum, a by-product of the FGD operation. This report attempts to address both these key issues.”

Say CSE researchers behind the report: “The coal-based power sector would require only seven to 10 million tonnes of limestone annually for operating FGD systems. This is less than 3 per cent of India’s present limestone consumption. For use in FGD, high-quality limestone (CaCO3 > 90 per cent) with minimal impurities is desirable. Industry experts believe that producing additional high-quality limestone would not be a challenge given our large reserves. Moreover, regional distribution of limestone reserves shows that access will not be a problem as a majority of power plants are located within 200 km of a limestone mine.”

Gypsum is a scarce resource in India. The quality of FGD gypsum is at par or even better than mineral gypsum and it has become a substitute for mineral gypsum across the world. China is able to utilise more than 70 per cent of its FGD gypsum, largely in cement and construction. In India as well, gypsum is an integral component of cement production and the sector has to rely on costly imports or poor-quality synthetic gypsum. CSE estimates that by adopting FGD, India’s power plants would produce around 12-17 million tonnes of gypsum which can easily meet the domestic shortfall and reduce the import burden. The cost of limestone, says CSE, will not be significant as it can be offset by selling FGD gypsum.

Key recommendations :

  • To ensure safety and minimise fugitive emissions, the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF&CC) should release guidelines for ensuring appropriate safeguards in handling, storage, and transport of limestone and gypsum.
  • The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) has specified broad guidelines for gypsum being used in the cement sector. The BIS may also need to specify the quality of limestone being used in FGDs to ensure good quality FGD gypsum.
  • While the use of FGD gypsum in the cement industry should be encouraged, it is also necessary to provide incentives to the manufacturers of high-end gypsum products like wall boards and plasterboards.
  • The agriculture sector can also become a valuable consumer of FGD gypsum; however, certain quality checks and field trials are essential to ensure that its use in agriculture is safe.
  • In the long term, power plants should be directed to use all the FGD gypsum that is produced; however, the short-term disposal guidelines can be issued.
Said Narain: “India is the largest emitter of SO2 in the world, contributing more than 15 per cent of global anthropogenic emissions. FGD systems in thermal power plants can reduce SO2 emissions from them by 80 per cent, points out this CSE report.”

https://www.cseindia.org/thermal-po...ew-emission-norms-says-cse-s-new-report-10044
 
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RISING SUN

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India’s total solar installations reached 7,346MW in 2019
In 2019, India’s solar energy installations reached a total of 7,346MW.

This is according to a report by Mercom Communications India, a subsidiary of the US-based Mercom Capital Group.
Despite this growth, last year’s total installations witnessed a year-on-year decline of 12%, with 2018 registering 8,338MW of capacity generation.

Of the total output, large-scale solar projects accounted for an 85% share, totalling 6,248MW. The remaining 15% share was allocated to rooftop solar projects of a total 1,104MW capacity.

By the end of the fourth quarter of 2019, an additional 23.7GW portfolio of large-scale solar projects was commissioned for development.

The decline in the sector’s growth has been attributed to a plethora of reasons, such as elections, credit crunch, economic slowdown and a reduced power demand.

The total investments made in the solar sector in 2019 amounted to $8.2 billion (£6.5bn), around 16% lower than in 2018.
Mercom India projects an installation of 8.5GW in solar power capacity for 2020.
 

Gautam

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Indian Scientists Come Up with an Improved Pseudocapacitor to Store Electrical Energy

With further developments, it can be used as a viable alternative to batteries

Apr 30, 2020
By Rakesh Ranjan
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In a novel discovery, scientists at the Institute of Nano Science and Technology (INST) have come up with new material for supercapacitors or pseudocapacitors, which can store electrical energy by electron charge transfer. INST is an autonomous institute under the Department of Science & Technology, Government of India.

This latest material can be used as an alternative to batteries as it offers a low-cost, highly scalable energy storage solution, according to the press release.

Ramendra Sundar Dey and his team of researchers at the INST have developed a new and exciting capability to overcome the long-standing challenges of pseudocapacitors, which includes their cycling stability and rate capability. Pseudocapacitors are a type of supercapacitors which store electrical energy by electron charge transfer.

The team at INST has developed a pseudocapacitive material, which is a hybrid xerogel structure for the very first time. The material was developed by combining dopamine onto a conductive matrix, like graphene.

Notably, this class of xerogel architectures has been reported to be an alternative to conventional pseudocapacitors. Still, they lack sufficient cycling stability to provide a viable alternative to batteries in the consumer market.

The researchers at INST investigated the reasons behind the fall in the performance of the active materials during long service hours and came up with a new synthetic approach. It was then correlated with the overall performance with explanation and theoretical support provided by Abir De Sarkar, who is also from the same institute.

Pseudocapacitors show a great promise as a low-cost and efficient energy storage solution, and there is every chance that it can be used for commercial applications. However, there are still some hurdles in the way.

The scientists at INST came up with this unique material by using a two-step synthesis procedure that is tailored in a way to take full structural advantage of the hybrid material. To develop the material, first, they used the hydrothermal synthesis method. Then they introduced the in situ electrochemical polymerization method to boost the overall storage capacity as well as the cycling stability.

A detailed study of the synthetic approach, as well as the mechanism of the redox supercapacitors at the molecular level, will go a long way in solving the issues of stability and inferior power output of pseudocapacitors and this bodes well for the future.

Recently, researchers from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology (CEST) came up with a new cathode material based on titanium fluoride phosphate, which is stated to be stable and has achieved superior performance at high discharge currents.

Earlier, scientists at Drexel University developed a new class of materials that can store electrical energy very quickly called MXene, which is two-dimensional titanium carbide. It works like a battery and can store a large amount of electrical energy through electrochemical reactions- but unlike batteries, they can be charged and discharged very quickly.

Indian Scientists Come Up with an Improved Pseudocapacitor to Store Electrical Energy - Mercom India
 

Gautam

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RITES Releases Tender for 1 GW of Solar Projects on Railways Land Across India

Complete details of the tender have not been made available yet

Apr 29, 2020
By Nithin Thomas Prasad
1588407565862.png


RITES Limited, an engineering consultancy company that specializes in transport infrastructure, has floated a tender for setting up 1 GW of land-based solar photovoltaic power projects on various zonal railways land across India.

Interested bidders are expected to make an earnest money deposit of ₹1 million (~$13,272), payable to the Railway Energy Management Company Limited (REMCL), a joint venture of the Indian Railways and RITES Limited. Applicants must also pay a tender fee of ₹29,000 (~$385) to the REMCL.

The last date for submission of bids is June 29, 2020. A pre-bid meeting will be held on May 28, 2020.

Mercom will cover this tender in more detail after relevant documents with more information are made available.

According to Mercom’s India Solar Tender Tracker, RITES has so far tendered nearly 366 MW of solar capacity.

A few months ago, Mercom had reported that the Indian Railways was planning to source approximately 1,000 MW of solar power and nearly 200 MW of wind power by 2021-22 across zonal railways and production units. Out of the 1 GW of solar projects, the ministry planned to install 500 MW on the rooftop of railway buildings while the remaining 500 MW were be used to meet both traction and non-traction requirements, according to a statement by the government.

The Indian Railways is the single largest consumer of electricity, with about a 2% share of the national energy consumption.

Last year, REMCL also issued a Request for Selection to procure power from wind-solar hybrid projects.

In November 2019, Piyush Goyal, the Minister of Railways, said that the ministry had installed 95.67 MW of rooftop solar systems, adding that the ministry had awarded nearly 248.46 MW of solar capacity.

Previously, the Railway Energy Management Company Limited issued a request for qualification (RfQ) to set up approximately 32.56 MW of rooftop solar systems at various railway establishments and stations across the zonal railways in India.

RITES Releases Tender for 1 GW of Solar Projects on Railways Land Across India - Mercom India
 

RISING SUN

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India invites bid for One Sun One World One Grid to take on China’s Belt and Road Initiative
India has moved ahead with threading-the-needle for an ambitious global electricity grid, with the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government on Tuesday calling for bids to roll-out the “One Sun One World One Grid" (OSOWOG) plan.

The pre-bid meeting called on 5 June by ministry of new and renewable energy (MNRE), comes at a time of the coronavirus pandemic giving India the opportunity to be seen as taking a lead in evolving global strategies.

“This is by far one of the most ambitious schemes undertaken by any country and is of global significance in terms of sharing economic benefits," said a senior Indian government official, requesting anonymity.

According to the Request for Proposal (RFP) reviewed by Mint for inviting consultants for developing OSOWOG’ long-term vision, implementation plan, road map and institutional framework; comprises a technical and financial proposal.

This also comes in the backdrop of the US withdrawal from the Paris climate deal and China’s attempts to co-opt countries into its ambitious One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative, a programme to invest billions of dollars in infrastructure projects, including railways, ports and power grids, across Asia, Africa and Europe.

“India’s Prime Minister recently called for connecting solar energy supply across borders, with the mantra of 'One Sun One World One Grid' (OSOWOG). The vision behind the OSOWOG mantra is “The Sun Never Sets" and is a constant at some geographical location, globally, at any given point of time," the RFP said.

The global grid plan may also leverage the International Solar Alliance (ISA) co-founded by India that has 67 countries as members. It has become India’s calling card on climate change and is increasingly being viewed as a foreign policy tool.

“With India at the fulcrum, the solar spectrum can easily be divided into two broad zones viz. far East which would include countries like Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Lao, Cambodia etc. and far West which would cover the Middle East and the Africa Region," the RFP added.

The ambitious task unveiled on 26 May has been taken up under the technical assistance program of the World Bank with the last date of proposal submission being 6 July.

Mint reported on 9 January about India starting consultations with the World Bank as its technical partner to implement the global electricity grid plan pitched by Prime Minister Modi.

The plan has been spread across three phases. The first phase deals with the Middle East—South Asia—-South East Asia (MESASEA) interconnection for sharing green energy sources such as solar for meeting electricity needs including peak demand.

Fostering cross-border energy trade is an important part of Modi’s South Asia-focused neighbourhood-first policy. India has been supplying power to Bangladesh and Nepal and has been championing a South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) electricity grid minus Pakistan to meet electricity demand in the region.

The initial plans also involve setting up an under-sea link to connect with Oman in the West.

While the second phase deals with the MESASEA grid getting interconnected with the African power pools; the third and final phase is about global interconnection.

“It’s only a question of transmission," power and new and renewable energy minister Raj Kumar Singh had earlier told Mint.

“An interconnected grid would help all the participating entities in attracting investments in renewable energy sources as well as utilizing skills, technology and finances. Resulting economic benefits would positively impact poverty alleviation and support in mitigating water, sanitation, food and other socioeconomic challenges," the RFP said.

“Further, the proposed integration would lead to reduced project costs, higher efficiencies and increased asset utilization for all the participating entities," the RFP added.

This comes in the backdrop of India looking to expedite the ISA’ playbook of setting up a World Solar Bank (WSB) to be headquartered here, that may require a total equity capital of $10 billion. The proposed bank comes in the backdrop of Beijing taking the lead in creating Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the New Development Bank (NDB).

ISA has been an important part of India’s messaging in the global fight against climate change.

In his address to the nation on 12 May during the ongoing pandemic Modi said, “International Solar Alliance is India’s gift against Global Warming."

“We have seen the world before Corona and the global systems in detail. Even after the infliction of the Corona crisis, we are constantly watching the situation unfolding across the globe. When we look at these two periods from India’s perspective, it seems that the 21st century is the century for India," Modi said.
 

Gautam

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India invites bid for One Sun One World One Grid to take on China’s Belt and Road Initiative
India has moved ahead with threading-the-needle for an ambitious global electricity grid, with the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government on Tuesday calling for bids to roll-out the “One Sun One World One Grid" (OSOWOG) plan.

The pre-bid meeting called on 5 June by ministry of new and renewable energy (MNRE), comes at a time of the coronavirus pandemic giving India the opportunity to be seen as taking a lead in evolving global strategies.

“This is by far one of the most ambitious schemes undertaken by any country and is of global significance in terms of sharing economic benefits," said a senior Indian government official, requesting anonymity.

According to the Request for Proposal (RFP) reviewed by Mint for inviting consultants for developing OSOWOG’ long-term vision, implementation plan, road map and institutional framework; comprises a technical and financial proposal.

This also comes in the backdrop of the US withdrawal from the Paris climate deal and China’s attempts to co-opt countries into its ambitious One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative, a programme to invest billions of dollars in infrastructure projects, including railways, ports and power grids, across Asia, Africa and Europe.

“India’s Prime Minister recently called for connecting solar energy supply across borders, with the mantra of 'One Sun One World One Grid' (OSOWOG). The vision behind the OSOWOG mantra is “The Sun Never Sets" and is a constant at some geographical location, globally, at any given point of time," the RFP said.

The global grid plan may also leverage the International Solar Alliance (ISA) co-founded by India that has 67 countries as members. It has become India’s calling card on climate change and is increasingly being viewed as a foreign policy tool.

“With India at the fulcrum, the solar spectrum can easily be divided into two broad zones viz. far East which would include countries like Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Lao, Cambodia etc. and far West which would cover the Middle East and the Africa Region," the RFP added.

The ambitious task unveiled on 26 May has been taken up under the technical assistance program of the World Bank with the last date of proposal submission being 6 July.

Mint reported on 9 January about India starting consultations with the World Bank as its technical partner to implement the global electricity grid plan pitched by Prime Minister Modi.

The plan has been spread across three phases. The first phase deals with the Middle East—South Asia—-South East Asia (MESASEA) interconnection for sharing green energy sources such as solar for meeting electricity needs including peak demand.

Fostering cross-border energy trade is an important part of Modi’s South Asia-focused neighbourhood-first policy. India has been supplying power to Bangladesh and Nepal and has been championing a South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) electricity grid minus Pakistan to meet electricity demand in the region.

The initial plans also involve setting up an under-sea link to connect with Oman in the West.

While the second phase deals with the MESASEA grid getting interconnected with the African power pools; the third and final phase is about global interconnection.

“It’s only a question of transmission," power and new and renewable energy minister Raj Kumar Singh had earlier told Mint.

“An interconnected grid would help all the participating entities in attracting investments in renewable energy sources as well as utilizing skills, technology and finances. Resulting economic benefits would positively impact poverty alleviation and support in mitigating water, sanitation, food and other socioeconomic challenges," the RFP said.

“Further, the proposed integration would lead to reduced project costs, higher efficiencies and increased asset utilization for all the participating entities," the RFP added.

This comes in the backdrop of India looking to expedite the ISA’ playbook of setting up a World Solar Bank (WSB) to be headquartered here, that may require a total equity capital of $10 billion. The proposed bank comes in the backdrop of Beijing taking the lead in creating Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the New Development Bank (NDB).

ISA has been an important part of India’s messaging in the global fight against climate change.

In his address to the nation on 12 May during the ongoing pandemic Modi said, “International Solar Alliance is India’s gift against Global Warming."

“We have seen the world before Corona and the global systems in detail. Even after the infliction of the Corona crisis, we are constantly watching the situation unfolding across the globe. When we look at these two periods from India’s perspective, it seems that the 21st century is the century for India," Modi said.
Excellent article, will post on twitter. Thank you.
 
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screambowl

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Dec 19, 2017
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India invites bid for One Sun One World One Grid to take on China’s Belt and Road Initiative
India has moved ahead with threading-the-needle for an ambitious global electricity grid, with the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government on Tuesday calling for bids to roll-out the “One Sun One World One Grid" (OSOWOG) plan.

The pre-bid meeting called on 5 June by ministry of new and renewable energy (MNRE), comes at a time of the coronavirus pandemic giving India the opportunity to be seen as taking a lead in evolving global strategies.

“This is by far one of the most ambitious schemes undertaken by any country and is of global significance in terms of sharing economic benefits," said a senior Indian government official, requesting anonymity.

According to the Request for Proposal (RFP) reviewed by Mint for inviting consultants for developing OSOWOG’ long-term vision, implementation plan, road map and institutional framework; comprises a technical and financial proposal.

This also comes in the backdrop of the US withdrawal from the Paris climate deal and China’s attempts to co-opt countries into its ambitious One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative, a programme to invest billions of dollars in infrastructure projects, including railways, ports and power grids, across Asia, Africa and Europe.

“India’s Prime Minister recently called for connecting solar energy supply across borders, with the mantra of 'One Sun One World One Grid' (OSOWOG). The vision behind the OSOWOG mantra is “The Sun Never Sets" and is a constant at some geographical location, globally, at any given point of time," the RFP said.

The global grid plan may also leverage the International Solar Alliance (ISA) co-founded by India that has 67 countries as members. It has become India’s calling card on climate change and is increasingly being viewed as a foreign policy tool.

“With India at the fulcrum, the solar spectrum can easily be divided into two broad zones viz. far East which would include countries like Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Lao, Cambodia etc. and far West which would cover the Middle East and the Africa Region," the RFP added.

The ambitious task unveiled on 26 May has been taken up under the technical assistance program of the World Bank with the last date of proposal submission being 6 July.

Mint reported on 9 January about India starting consultations with the World Bank as its technical partner to implement the global electricity grid plan pitched by Prime Minister Modi.

The plan has been spread across three phases. The first phase deals with the Middle East—South Asia—-South East Asia (MESASEA) interconnection for sharing green energy sources such as solar for meeting electricity needs including peak demand.

Fostering cross-border energy trade is an important part of Modi’s South Asia-focused neighbourhood-first policy. India has been supplying power to Bangladesh and Nepal and has been championing a South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) electricity grid minus Pakistan to meet electricity demand in the region.

The initial plans also involve setting up an under-sea link to connect with Oman in the West.

While the second phase deals with the MESASEA grid getting interconnected with the African power pools; the third and final phase is about global interconnection.

“It’s only a question of transmission," power and new and renewable energy minister Raj Kumar Singh had earlier told Mint.

“An interconnected grid would help all the participating entities in attracting investments in renewable energy sources as well as utilizing skills, technology and finances. Resulting economic benefits would positively impact poverty alleviation and support in mitigating water, sanitation, food and other socioeconomic challenges," the RFP said.

“Further, the proposed integration would lead to reduced project costs, higher efficiencies and increased asset utilization for all the participating entities," the RFP added.

This comes in the backdrop of India looking to expedite the ISA’ playbook of setting up a World Solar Bank (WSB) to be headquartered here, that may require a total equity capital of $10 billion. The proposed bank comes in the backdrop of Beijing taking the lead in creating Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the New Development Bank (NDB).

ISA has been an important part of India’s messaging in the global fight against climate change.

In his address to the nation on 12 May during the ongoing pandemic Modi said, “International Solar Alliance is India’s gift against Global Warming."

“We have seen the world before Corona and the global systems in detail. Even after the infliction of the Corona crisis, we are constantly watching the situation unfolding across the globe. When we look at these two periods from India’s perspective, it seems that the 21st century is the century for India," Modi said.

Whats the point? When there are idiots like Kejri giving free electricity to people. How is the company going to earn? Delhi has huge demand of electricity, and soon proper EV charging station will be installed. 20% of Delhi's population pays no bill.
 

vingensys

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I hope in the euphoria to create "global renewable energy grid", somebody map out the potential and realised energy sources, across, at the least in Asia. May be just figure out the present and future capacity of generating stations in the Tibet , Sichuan, yunan area (China Southern Power Grid), the demand and load centres there and the surplus. And finally the rules of demand and supply as well as the "fair & competitive" practices of state owned Chinese giants. As I had said, we are hell bent on paving the road for China's ascension with roses.
 

Gautam

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Feb 16, 2019
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