Project 75 India Diesel-electric Submarine Programs (SSK) : Updates and Discussions

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
14,147
10,175
Mumbai
Indian Navy's 6 new indigenous submarines won't have indigenous AIP for prolonged underwater stay

Read @ANI Story | Indian Navy's 6 new indigenous submarines won't have indigenous AIP for prolonged underwater stay https://t.co/0U8xATU9aA

IMG_20210712_161751.jpg



Makes one wonder what were all those " land based tests " carried out by DMRL at times witnessed by the IN all about. Does anyone have a clue ?
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Hydra

Ankit Kumar

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,412
2,181
Bangalore
Russians won't get in untill Delhi decides to do Russia a favour. Our DRDO AIP is actually more closer to getting certified than theirs. It's between Naval Group and TKMS pretty much.
 

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
14,147
10,175
Mumbai

As per this video, in view of the upcoming tender for P-75(I) , MDL has sent out EOI's for potential collaboration to all the 5 bidders in this project with a clause that they're seeking as per the IN's specifications only proven AIP systems on an underwater platform which in turn would rule out everybody except the Germans & South Koreans.
 

Bon Plan

Well-Known member
Dec 1, 2017
1,920
853
France
MDL has sent out EOI's for potential collaboration to all the 5 bidders in this project with a clause that they're seeking as per the IN's specifications only proven AIP systems on an underwater platform which in turn would rule out everybody except the Germans & South Koreans.
You forget the 2 Agosta with AIP for.... pak !
 
  • Like
Reactions: _Anonymous_

Tatvamasi

Well-Known member
Jan 5, 2018
664
567
India

As per this video, in view of the upcoming tender for P-75(I) , MDL has sent out EOI's for potential collaboration to all the 5 bidders in this project with a clause that they're seeking as per the IN's specifications only proven AIP systems on an underwater platform which in turn would rule out everybody except the Germans & South Koreans.
Its always based on articles never a video

 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
10,850
8,196
India
AIP FET will murder P-75I. It's gonna delay the technical shortlist by 2 years, and most contenders will get kicked out.
 

Ankit Kumar

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,412
2,181
Bangalore

As per this video, in view of the upcoming tender for P-75(I) , MDL has sent out EOI's for potential collaboration to all the 5 bidders in this project with a clause that they're seeking as per the IN's specifications only proven AIP systems on an underwater platform which in turn would rule out everybody except the Germans & South Koreans.
Naval Group has their own 2nd Generation Fuel cell on offering. And till the OEM is ready to provide guarantees, there's no Problem.
South Koreans.
If proven on an active duty submarine is criteria, South Korea is out too.
 

Ankit Kumar

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,412
2,181
Bangalore
The FC2G AIP system has seen rapid development from 2016 to 2019. However I haven't followed it since then. Others might shed some light on this.
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
10,850
8,196
India
The Type214s have HDW ones. The KSS-III is still not commissioned.
If proven on an active duty submarine is criteria, South Korea is out too.

The KSS-III is undergoing sea trials though. I'm sure the IN will accept sea trials data. Anyway there's a good chance the first Korean sub will be commissioned this year. Also, if field trails are to be conducted, it will happen only in the middle of 2022.

The entire point of this exercise was to conduct paper trials, get L1 within a year and sign a contract in a few more months after that. Now it looks like the MMRCA saga.

But what's even more interesting is MDL is willing to kick the French out if only to reduce L&T's chances.
 
Last edited:

Picdelamirand-oil

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,236
2,726
73
France
transition.wifeo.com
Spain's Navantia has had one setback after another in the design of its new class of S-80 attack submarines.

Another setback that must make DCNS (Naval Group) engineers smile: the French industrial group had blasted the attitude of the Spanish group Navantia, ten years ago. Since the 1990s, the two groups had been in partnership for the design of Scorpene-type submarines... until Navantia made "a child in the back" to the French group. In 2008, the Spaniards abruptly withdrew from the Scorpene project (keeping the accumulated knowledge), to build, in collaboration with the Americans, the S-80 class. The latter will be in direct competition, on the international markets, with the Scorpene... now 100% French, after a negotiation before the International Court of Arbitration, to consummate the divorce.

The old proverb For want of a nail about a king who lost his kingdom because his horse had a faulty shoe nail is a staple in school to teach us that the little things can make a world of difference. Like a mistake caused by a misplaced decimal point that can take years and cost billions to rectify!

The S-80 project has seemingly become a laughing stock for technology mismanagement and planning.

The first of four S-80 class submarines was expected to be ready by 2015, but its builders and the Spanish Navy uncovered a potentially fatal flaw in its design in 2013. The first S-80 was over 100 tonnes heavier than specified and serious doubts emerged about its capability to resurface from underwater. Personnel in Spain's ministry of defence later attributed the problem to the fact that the design team had “misplaced” a decimal point in weight calculations and the navy had added new systems to the submarines.

To modify the defects on the S-80 design, the Spanish government contracted the services of an American submarine builder, Electric Boat. Electric Boat and Navantia then “resolved” the weight problem of the S-80, by lengthening the submarine's hull by over 8 metres to nearly 80 metres, also adding hundreds of tonnes in displacement.

The S-80 submarines, which will now displace over 3,000 tonnes underwater, have a new problem, though—they are now too long to be docked at the Spanish Navy's base at Cartagena.

The cost of the S-80 project is expected to reach nearly euro 4 billion, from the initial budget—allocated in the previous decade—of euro 2 billion.

As a result of the weight and length problems, the first S-80 submarine is expected to enter service only by 2022, nearly seven years late. The submarine is also having problems with its fuel cell air-independent propulsion (AIP) system.

The irony of the story does not end there: the modifications could not be applied to the first of the four models. The S-81 (Isaac Peral) was already too far advanced in its construction and would only be modified after delivery. The AIP propulsion system, which allows the submarine to stay underwater for a fortnight, may not be able to move a vessel that is 50% heavier, and will in any case only be delivered in 2026, on the third model.