Naval Offshore Patrol Vessels of Indian Navy and Coast Guard : Updates & Discussions

randomradio

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Looks like Motabhai isn't interested or perhaps Anilbhai didn't persuasions to him weren't strong & emotive enough. @Milspec ;

Interesting isn't it? Russia would now technically be in a position to service USN boats. It happens only in India.@randomradio

The Russians are making that move in order to force the US to back out of this deal with India.

The shipyard is very important to the US due to its proximity to the Middle East.
 

STEPHEN COHEN

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Dec 4, 2017
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The Russians are making that move in order to force the US to back out of this deal with India.

The shipyard is very important to the US due to its proximity to the Middle East.

Similarly this Shipyard can become a defacto Russian Naval Base in India

Russia only has one base in Syria

It may be looking for another in Asia

Also there was a news that they want
A LEMOA like agreement with India
 

Milspec

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Looks like Motabhai isn't interested or perhaps Anilbhai's persuasions to him weren't strong & emotive enough. @Milspec ;

Interesting isn't it? Russia would now technically be in a position to service USN boats. It happens only in India.@randomradio
Mota bhai to the rescue.
 

_Anonymous_

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Mota bhai to the rescue.
Well, he's not buying. I suspect were it DRAL, he wouldn't think twice. Sad development though. A good shipyard gone to seed thanks to unrealistic assumptions, lack of clarity, exceedingly ambitious plans by the original founders compounded by Anilbhai, directionless MoD policies, etc.
 

Ashwin

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Russia confirms USC's move to acquire Indian shipbuilder


The Russian embassy in India has confirmed that the Russian state-owned group, United Shipbuilding Corporation (USC), is bidding to acquire troubled Indian shipyard Reliance Naval and Engineering Ltd (RNEL).

In a recent statement, the embassy said USC is currently auditing Mumbai-based RNEL and assessing potential investment opportunities. “UCS [has] passed the accreditation procedure, which provided access to electronic accounts with financial and economic documents related to the Indian company,” said the embassy.

The Russian embassy in India has confirmed that Russian shipbuilding group USC is considering a bid to acquire Indian firm Reliance Naval and Engineering, whose recent projects have included the construction of offshore patrol vessels for the Indian Navy (pictured). (Indian Navy)


The Russian embassy in India has confirmed that Russian shipbuilding group USC is considering a bid to acquire Indian firm Reliance Naval and Engineering, whose recent projects have included the construction of offshore patrol vessels for the Indian Navy (pictured). (Indian Navy)

It added, “[USC] is currently conducting due diligence of RNEL’s condition and assessing parameters of possible investments”.

The embassy went on to say that due to the Covid-19 pandemic USC has faced “some difficulties” in carrying out a “comprehensive analysis” of RNEL, particularly in terms of direct talks between the two sides.

However, it said, USC is anticipated to finalise its decision soon on whether to table a formal bid for the Indian naval shipbuilder.

“USC is expected to finalise its stance on further participation in the bidding procedure after completing the remote study of the documents provided by the debtor’s trustee and the field review of the RNEL’s assets by USC’s specialists,” it said.

RNEL has been facing severe economic pressures for several years, with its sale intended to pay off its heavy debts, which are linked to its previous shipyard expansion and downturns in commercial shipbuilding and energy sectors.

The company was previously owned by the Reliance Infrastructure group but has been under the control of a court-appointed insolvency firm since earlier this year.
 

Ashwin

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After scrapping orders given to the Pipavav shipyard, the Indian Navy has got the approval now to issue a tender worth over Rs 9,000 crore for acquiring 11 next-generation Offshore Patrol Vessels for its surface fleet.
The Defence Ministry had recently approved the scrapping of a tender for acquiring five Naval Offshore Patrol Vessels from Anil Ambani-owned Pipavav Shipyards after long delays in the delivery schedule. The numbers have now been added to the Next Generation Offshore Patrol Vessels project and instead of six, 11 of them would be acquired through a tender process under Make in India, defence sources said here.
 
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Amal

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raghu1974

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11 NGOPVs. :love: Now that's how you should order ships.

And this BTW is interesting.

View attachment 18856
That's correct. To date, our ship building capabilities weren't world class and it took us ever to build our warships. This also shows us that we have (both Public & Private) shortened the time taken and hence we won't be in a situation that by the time we complete the order, the technology has moved on to the next level and we are stuck with these vessels for another 3 decades. Slowly this will progress to Corvettes, Frigates and Destroyers, but that is another decade or so away. We need technology to manufacture engines and marine radars, which are still being imported and lead to delays in delivering our larger warships.
 
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GuardianRED

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Ashwin

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Last Tuesday, the Indian Coast Guard commissioned the eighth ship of an order of 11 Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) that Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) is constructing. Simultaneously, Larsen & Toubro (L&T) is delivering another seven OPVs of the so-called Vikram class from its Katupalli shipyard in Tamil Nadu.

These OPVs have two things in common. First, they are designed to patrol long distances, with endurances of 5,000-6,000 nautical miles (10-11,000 kilometres). Second, for such large combat vessels – they are both about 100 metres long and displace over 2,000 tonnes – they are very lightly armed. Each carries just one 30-millimetre (mm) CRN 91 naval gun and two 12.7 mm machine guns.

In comparison, corvettes and small frigates of comparable size carry a far more potent weapons package that can counter enemy threats from the air, surface or underwater. Coast Guard OPVs are negligibly armed, even though the Union War Book mandates that all its ships will come under the navy as soon as war breaks out. That means these vessels should be prepared to participate in full-fledged naval combat.




In its visualisation of NG OPVs, the navy is visualising a model that draws from the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) concept of the US Navy. This envisions a package of mission-oriented weaponry, customised for a particular mission, which can be containerised and fitted onto an OPV that is embarking upon a particular mission. The customised package, which could include missiles and UAVs for example, can be bolted onto the patrol vessel’s deck and utilised when needed.

@Amal @aditya g @Ankit Kumar any CGI/pics of NGOPV yet?
 
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Amal

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any CGI/pics of NGOPV yet?

Nope. There should be competing designs, we will have to wait for some Defence expo.

In its visualisation of NG OPVs, the navy is visualising a model that draws from the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) concept of the US Navy. This envisions a package of mission-oriented weaponry, customised for a particular mission, which can be containerised and fitted onto an OPV that is embarking upon a particular mission

Yup.

1608576588006.png


Also this is interesting.

1608576689969.png
 
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Amal

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Interesting...

In keeping with the Government’s thrust for adoption of Artificial Intelligence into Defence Systems and processes, GSL has embarked upon a strategy for building a vibrant AI ecosystem with intelligent machines enabling high-level cognitive processes in its shipbuilding products and processes. As part of digital strategy, GSL in collaboration with an Industry partner, has developed a Condition Monitoring System (CMS) using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Main Engine On-Board for Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV). The system brings together best of engineering and data science expertise to solve the complex problem of engine health prediction.

 
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