Kashmir : Counter Terror Operation Updates and Discussions

S

Seiko

The security forces on Thursday killed four terrorists in two separate encounters in Budgam and Sopore districts of Jammu and Kashmir. The Army, the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and the Jammu and Kashmir Police jointly launched anti-terrorist operations in the Putlipora-Pakharpora area in Budgamdistrict and Sagipora area in Sopore district. Talking to ANI, Inspector General of Police (Kashmir) Munir Khan said, “The Army, the Budgam police and the CRPF launched a joint operation after getting specific information that three to four Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) and one local militant were hiding in a house of Putlipora-Pakharpora. The moment the cordon was established in that particular house, the militants started firing on the search parties. It’s basically a big house; that’s why it took some time to neutralise these militants. Three militants have been killed and we are looking for another one.” He also said that one civilian was injured during the encounter due to bullet injury and has been shifted to the hospital where his condition is stable. Talking about the Sopore encounter, Khan said there was specific information about two terrorists trapped in the Sagipora Top area of Sopore district. “The security forces cordoned the hideout of the terrorist, but the terrorists started running towards the Sagipora village as soon as they saw security forces. One of the militants has been killed near Sagipora village. The search is on for another militant,” Khan said. He added that Sagipora encounter may take some time as there are 30-40 houses which are to be searched thoroughly. Replying to a poser, Khan said, “There has been increased infiltration of JeM Cadre from Poonch, Kupwara and Gurej side. They are scattered in the different parts of the valley. That is why we are having encounters with JeM Cadres.” In the Budgam encounter, the security forces recovered one AK-47 rifle, and one totally burnt weapon, which could be M-4 rifle. One killed terrorist has been identified as Shabbir, who was a local militant. Rest two terrorists are foreign militants belonging to the JeM.

http://****/four-terrorists-killed-in-two-encounters-in-j-k/
 

Levina

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Dec 2, 2017
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And 3 confirmed dead today, one of them was the new Divisional commander of LeT -Furqan.

It all began with terrorists attacking an army convoy today and claiming that they have caused huge damage to IA. At that point one jawan was injured, had taken a bullet wound to his leg, also a terrorist was killed.
The other two terrorists had by then taken shelter in a pvt school building near by.
Soon reinforcement was called in.
The first step was to suck out the oxygen out of structure in which the Terrorists were hiding, for this purpose a C-90 rocket launcher was used.
This killed a 2nd terrorist.
The third one came running out of the structure spraying bullets on the soldiers outside, only to be killed by 2 magazines of bullets.
The Fierce encounter at Qazigund, south Kashmir which included Furqan’s elimination is a major blow to LeT Ops in South Kashmir.
On 30th Nov, Muzhamil Ahmed, then div commander of LeT was killed by IA.
 

Seiko

Active member
Dec 1, 2017
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Gods Own Country
3 LeT terrorists involved in Amarnath Yatra attack killed in encounter in Kashmir


SRINAGAR: Three Lashker-e-Taiba terrorists, including two Pakistanis, allegedly responsible for carrying out an attack on Amarnath pilgrims in July this year, were killed in an encounter in South Kashmir, police said on Tuesday.

One terrorist, who had managed to flee from the encounter site, was also arrested by the police from a maternity hospital of Anantnag district of South Kashmir, they said.

Read this story in Marathi

The encounter broke on Monday afternoon when the terrorists opened fire on an Army convoy, on its way to Srinagar, at Qazigund on Jammu-Srinagar national highway. One soldier was killed in the attack while another sustained injuries.

The security forces cordoned off the area and launched a hunt for the terrorists. The search operation turned into an encounter with terrorists which ended at 2am this morning, the police said.

The police identified the dead terrorists as Yawar Basir, who is a local terrorist, Abu Furqan and Abu Maviya (both foreign terrorists). Basir, hailing from Habiash of Kulgam, joined ranks with Lashker-e-Taiba this year in February after snatching weapon from a policeman.

Furqan had taken over as the head of Lashker-e-Taiba in South Kashmir after the death of Abu Ismail, who had led the attack on Amarnath pilgrims in July this year.

Police said that all the three, killed on Tuesday, were part of the squad that carried out the attack on yatris on July 10. Eight pilgrims were killed and 19 others injured.

Police said the group headed by Furqan, was involved in a series of terror crimes in Anantnag and Kulgam area, which included the Yatra Bus Attack case at Bantingo, few attacks on security forces at Lower Munda on the national highway, attack on police party at bus stand in Anantnag.

Furqan had replaced Ismail in South Kashmir and was responsible for the recent attacks carried by LeT, police said.


Pursuing the leads available at Qazigund encounter, one individual Rashid Ahmed Allai of Hamzapora sangam Bijibehera was arrested from Janglatmandi maternity hospital with a Chinese pistol and live cartridges last night. He was missing since last two days from his house and had joined the Yawar group of LeT.

The police said that he was part of the terrorist group when they carried out attack on army at Qazigund yesterday but managed to escape from the site when encounter broke.


He had taken shelter at the hospital in Anantnag with the help of one of his associate.

According to the police, he along with his associates were intending to snatch weapon from the policemen by attacking them.

3 LeT terrorists involved in Amarnath Yatra attack killed in encounter in Kashmir - Times of India
 
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Seiko

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No let up in operations against terrorists, says Army chief


Operations against militants in Kashmir will continue, Army chief General Bipin Rawat asserted today adding that while it was upto the "neighbouring country" as to how it treats terrorist organisations but India will continue to raise the issue.
"Operations in Kashmir are going on continuously and we an improvement in the situation in the Valley. Such operations will go on," Rawat told reporters on the sidelines of a ceremony at Suratgarh military station.
The security forces in Jammu and Kashmir have eliminated ovr 200 militants this year, the highest number since 2010.
In an apparent reference to Pakistan, Rawat said that how the "neighbouring country" deals with terrorist organisation is their matter "but we will keep raising this".
We do not want that such organisations are promoted, he said.
Rawat was at the Suratgarh military station in Sriganganagar district to present the President's Standard to three regiments.< ..
The Army chief presented the Standard to 87 Armoured regiment, 47 Armoured regiment and 10 Armoured regiment after a mounted parade which was attended by south western Army commander Lt Gen Cherish Mathson, Lt Gen P C Thimmaya general officer commanding of Chetak corps and other senior officers.
The chief hosts of the event were the Colonels of the Regiments of three Armoured regiments-- Maj Gen Vinod Sharma, Maj Gen S S Mahal and Maj Gen Kulpreet Singh respectively, according to defence spokesperson Lt Col Manish Ojha.
A formation of T-72 main battle tanks, the mainstay of Indian Armoured Corps, displaying might of the Army was commanded by Brig Praveen Chabbra, commander of Sand Viper brigade with Regiment contingent commanded by respective commanding officers.
The honour was bestowed upon the three Armoured regiments in due recognition of the dedicated and meritorious service rendered by them since raising, more than three decades back.

No let up in operations against terrorists, says Army chief
 
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Seiko

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Gods Own Country
As winter sets in terror groups look for local terrorists in Kashmir


In a bid to beat the Indian Army, terror groups especially the Hizbul Mujahideen have begun an aggressive social media campaign to rope in more locals into their fold.

On the social media, these groups continue to flog the Burhan Wani issue in a big way. In fact Wani gave the terror groups more traction than Afzal Guru. When Guru was hanged in 2013, terror groups were able to recruit only 53 in his name. However in the case of Wani, terror groups were able to rope in 88 terrorists in 2016 and 100 in 2017.

The Hizbul Mujahideen has flooded its social media channels with heavy content. It speaks about the atrocities by the Indian Government and how everyone must fight in the name of Burhan Wani.

It is a relentless fight now for the security agencies. The year 2017 has seen 203 terrorists being killed, the highest in 7 years. However if one looks at the recruitment, it is still the highest in the past ten years.

Army officials have been asked to target the local recruiters too. They are the ones who are trying to lure the youth at a time when the Indian Army is trying to restore peace in the Valley.

As winter sets in terror groups look for local terrorists in Kashmir
 
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Levina

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Dec 2, 2017
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Militants have literally walked into the ambush laid by Army in Shopian. Lolz
I am expecting good news.
 

RATHORE

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Dec 2, 2017
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The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir

by
Gaurav Arya


- Dec 10, 2017, 11:46 am

24​
SHARES​
[COLOR=rgba(54, 54, 52, 0.6)]The downtown Srinagar. (Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)​
Snapshot​
  • There are many Kashmiris in the Valley who risk death everyday just to tell India’s story

“Jai Hind, sir. Someone wants to meet you. He says his name is Irfan Ahmad Lone and he is from downtown,” said the voice of the guard commander from the main gate.
“Jai Hind. Check identification and let him in. He can come to the Officers’ Mess lawn,” I responded. I was staying in Humhama, which is not far from Srinagar Airport.
“Identification checked, sir. He will reach you in three minutes. He is being escorted,” the soldier’s voice said, ever efficient. Soldiers like to give timelines, even when they are not required.
After what seemed like exactly three minutes, a soldier came to the Officers’ Mess lawns and with him came my visitor from downtown. Truth be told, downtown is not the nicest part of Srinagar. This is the separatist hub that sees massive stone pelting, suitably adorned with Pakistani and Islamic State flags.
My visitor had been calling me for the past few months wanting to know when I will be coming to Srinagar. I don’t know how Irfan got my phone number but he would call me every week from a different phone. Most calls I get from Kashmir are either inquisitive or hostile. This was neither. Irfan was extremely polite and would speak with the aap-janaab etiquette of old Lucknow.
He sat down shyly. The soldier saluted and left. Irfan was short and slim and sported a beard, as is the fashion in Kashmir these days. He wore jeans and a brown pullover.
I shook hands with Irfan and something seemed to be wrong with his right arm. It was not straight. Irfan saw me looking at his arm and smiled.
“Sir, they broke my arm. The doctor was too scared to treat me, and I guess my arm healed the wrong way,” he said in a very matter of fact voice.
“Who broke your arm, Irfan? And why?” I asked.
“Sir, the Hurriyat’s boys put my elbow between two bricks and someone kicked my elbow downwards. My arm snapped.”
“Why?” I asked perplexed.
“I was waving the tricolour,” Irfan laughed, his eyes dancing in the sunlight.
I asked him what he would like to have. Yes, you can have whatever you like. Coffee it was.
“Patriots are not respected in Kashmir, sir,” said Irfan. I listened as he went on in his slow drawl.
Irfan was a part of a small group of young men, all Kashmiri Muslims, who would spend their free time writing pro-India articles and posting them on anonymous Facebook accounts. To use one’s real name was to invite a painful death. There was an advocate from Pulwama, a merchant from Tral and a few others from Srinagar who comprised this motley group.
“We meet once every few months at my house to discuss strategy,” said Irfan in a voice dripping with what he thought was conspiracy.
I was intrigued. Why would a Kashmiri Muslim living in downtown Srinagar risk his life to write pro-India articles, I asked Irfan?
“India is not just your country. It is mine, too,” he said. Point taken.
“When I was in the army, I was armed and I had my soldiers. But you are out in the open, unarmed and alone. They will kill you,” I said.
“Then perhaps I am more Indian than you, Major sahib,” said Irfan laughing.
Yes. I remember my commanding officer telling me that you don’t have to wear a uniform to be a patriot.
We spoke about this and that, Irfan and I.
He told me that he had a few cracked ribs and four teeth missing. To drive home the point, he lifted his upper lip with his tongue and sure enough, a gaping hole greeted me.
I excused myself and went inside the Officers’ Mess. I called my police contact from downtown. I asked him about Irfan.
“You are sitting with pagal Irfan?” the policeman laughed loudly. It seemed that Irfan was known by his more famous nom de guerre of pagal Irfan, or mad Irfan.
“Janab, the only reason he is alive is that people think he is mad. Last time he went to Lal Chowk and got into a fistfight with a Hurriyat strongman. They almost lynched him. Junooni hai woh,” said the cop.
I walked back into the sunlight, welcoming the sudden warmth.
The waiter came, carrying coffee and cookies. Irfan took his cup of coffee and dipped a cookie in it, before putting it in his mouth. We had our coffee in silence.
We put down our cups. Irfan said that he wanted a favour. I told him that if I could do it, I would. So, what did he want?
“Tell people in Delhi that we may be few, but our faith is strong. But tell them to act fast. We have no support. Everyday we risk our lives to tell India’s story. I am not sure I will be alive when you come next,” said Irfan in a matter of fact tone.
“Take it easy for a few weeks. You have much work to do. If anything happens to you, your mission will be compromised,” I tried to reason with him.
“Life and death are in the hands of Allah, Major sahab. If he chooses death for me, so be it. He is munificent. He is merciful. And even if I die, I will be like Lt Umar Fayaz. He is a martyr and for many boys in Kashmir, he is a role model.”
Irfan got up to leave. I walked with him for a few minutes, to see him off.
“Will you be waving the tricolour again? Be careful,” I told him, smilingly.
Irfan gave me a wide smile, the beginning of which revealed the four missing teeth. He reached into his pocket and removed a clean, white handkerchief. He unfolded the handkerchief.
Inside the folds of the pure white cloth was a small tricolour.
He put the handkerchief back in his pocket. We shook hands and embraced. Irfan turned towards the massive iron-gate, adorned with concertina wire, and slowly walked out.
As I saw him exit, my mind went back to what the policeman from downtown had said about him.
Junooni hai wohpagal Irfan.
Disclaimer: Irfan’s real name has been withheld to protect him. There are many Kashmiri Muslims like Irfan in the Valley. They are largely unsupported and they risk death everyday, just to tell India’s story. They use false identities and names. They meet in secret at night. They put themselves and their families in danger, because they believe in India.
This article was originally published on Major Gaurav Aryas blog and has been republished here with permission.


Original Link: The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir
[/COLOR]
 

Levina

Social media admin
Dec 2, 2017
140
443
The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir


by
Gaurav Arya


- Dec 10, 2017, 11:46 am

24​
SHARES​
[COLOR=rgba(54, 54, 52, 0.6)]The downtown Srinagar. (Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)​
Snapshot​
  • There are many Kashmiris in the Valley who risk death everyday just to tell India’s story

“Jai Hind, sir. Someone wants to meet you. He says his name is Irfan Ahmad Lone and he is from downtown,” said the voice of the guard commander from the main gate.
“Jai Hind. Check identification and let him in. He can come to the Officers’ Mess lawn,” I responded. I was staying in Humhama, which is not far from Srinagar Airport.
“Identification checked, sir. He will reach you in three minutes. He is being escorted,” the soldier’s voice said, ever efficient. Soldiers like to give timelines, even when they are not required.
After what seemed like exactly three minutes, a soldier came to the Officers’ Mess lawns and with him came my visitor from downtown. Truth be told, downtown is not the nicest part of Srinagar. This is the separatist hub that sees massive stone pelting, suitably adorned with Pakistani and Islamic State flags.
My visitor had been calling me for the past few months wanting to know when I will be coming to Srinagar. I don’t know how Irfan got my phone number but he would call me every week from a different phone. Most calls I get from Kashmir are either inquisitive or hostile. This was neither. Irfan was extremely polite and would speak with the aap-janaab etiquette of old Lucknow.
He sat down shyly. The soldier saluted and left. Irfan was short and slim and sported a beard, as is the fashion in Kashmir these days. He wore jeans and a brown pullover.
I shook hands with Irfan and something seemed to be wrong with his right arm. It was not straight. Irfan saw me looking at his arm and smiled.
“Sir, they broke my arm. The doctor was too scared to treat me, and I guess my arm healed the wrong way,” he said in a very matter of fact voice.
“Who broke your arm, Irfan? And why?” I asked.
“Sir, the Hurriyat’s boys put my elbow between two bricks and someone kicked my elbow downwards. My arm snapped.”
“Why?” I asked perplexed.
“I was waving the tricolour,” Irfan laughed, his eyes dancing in the sunlight.
I asked him what he would like to have. Yes, you can have whatever you like. Coffee it was.
“Patriots are not respected in Kashmir, sir,” said Irfan. I listened as he went on in his slow drawl.
Irfan was a part of a small group of young men, all Kashmiri Muslims, who would spend their free time writing pro-India articles and posting them on anonymous Facebook accounts. To use one’s real name was to invite a painful death. There was an advocate from Pulwama, a merchant from Tral and a few others from Srinagar who comprised this motley group.
“We meet once every few months at my house to discuss strategy,” said Irfan in a voice dripping with what he thought was conspiracy.
I was intrigued. Why would a Kashmiri Muslim living in downtown Srinagar risk his life to write pro-India articles, I asked Irfan?
“India is not just your country. It is mine, too,” he said. Point taken.
“When I was in the army, I was armed and I had my soldiers. But you are out in the open, unarmed and alone. They will kill you,” I said.
“Then perhaps I am more Indian than you, Major sahib,” said Irfan laughing.
Yes. I remember my commanding officer telling me that you don’t have to wear a uniform to be a patriot.
We spoke about this and that, Irfan and I.
He told me that he had a few cracked ribs and four teeth missing. To drive home the point, he lifted his upper lip with his tongue and sure enough, a gaping hole greeted me.
I excused myself and went inside the Officers’ Mess. I called my police contact from downtown. I asked him about Irfan.
“You are sitting with pagal Irfan?” the policeman laughed loudly. It seemed that Irfan was known by his more famous nom de guerre of pagal Irfan, or mad Irfan.
“Janab, the only reason he is alive is that people think he is mad. Last time he went to Lal Chowk and got into a fistfight with a Hurriyat strongman. They almost lynched him. Junooni hai woh,” said the cop.
I walked back into the sunlight, welcoming the sudden warmth.
The waiter came, carrying coffee and cookies. Irfan took his cup of coffee and dipped a cookie in it, before putting it in his mouth. We had our coffee in silence.
We put down our cups. Irfan said that he wanted a favour. I told him that if I could do it, I would. So, what did he want?
“Tell people in Delhi that we may be few, but our faith is strong. But tell them to act fast. We have no support. Everyday we risk our lives to tell India’s story. I am not sure I will be alive when you come next,” said Irfan in a matter of fact tone.
“Take it easy for a few weeks. You have much work to do. If anything happens to you, your mission will be compromised,” I tried to reason with him.
“Life and death are in the hands of Allah, Major sahab. If he chooses death for me, so be it. He is munificent. He is merciful. And even if I die, I will be like Lt Umar Fayaz. He is a martyr and for many boys in Kashmir, he is a role model.”
Irfan got up to leave. I walked with him for a few minutes, to see him off.
“Will you be waving the tricolour again? Be careful,” I told him, smilingly.
Irfan gave me a wide smile, the beginning of which revealed the four missing teeth. He reached into his pocket and removed a clean, white handkerchief. He unfolded the handkerchief.
Inside the folds of the pure white cloth was a small tricolour.
He put the handkerchief back in his pocket. We shook hands and embraced. Irfan turned towards the massive iron-gate, adorned with concertina wire, and slowly walked out.
As I saw him exit, my mind went back to what the policeman from downtown had said about him.
Junooni hai wohpagal Irfan.
Disclaimer: Irfan’s real name has been withheld to protect him. There are many Kashmiri Muslims like Irfan in the Valley. They are largely unsupported and they risk death everyday, just to tell India’s story. They use false identities and names. They meet in secret at night. They put themselves and their families in danger, because they believe in India.
This article was originally published on Major Gaurav Aryas blog and has been republished here with permission.


Original Link: The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir
[/COLOR]

Lets spread this story so that ppl come to know of the other side of Kashmir.
 

Shashank

Well-Known member
Dec 4, 2017
866
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Ban galore
Shopian encounter: 2 militants killed; woman dies as clashes erupt between locals, forces

A 24-year-old woman was killed on Tuesday during clashes near the site of an encounter in Jammu and Kashmir’s Shopian district where two militants were gunned down by security forces overnight.

The woman, identified by locals as Beauty Jan, wife of Manzoor Ahmad, was hit by a bullet during clashes between security forces and locals near the encounter site in Bhatmaran village of the district in south Kashmir.

She was rushed to a hospital but died on the way.

DIG (south Kashmir), S P Pani confirmed the woman’s death in crossfire and asked people to stay away from the site as the operation was still on to nab a third militant.

More at : Shopian encounter: 2 militants killed; woman dies as clashes erupt between locals, forces
 

Seiko

Active member
Dec 1, 2017
241
167
Gods Own Country
Amnesty to stone-pelters in Kashmir will encourage youth to shun violence: IG CRPF

A top paramilitary Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) officer on Saturday said that amnesty given to first-time stone pelters in Kashmir was a “large-hearted” approach of the government.

IG CRPF Ravideep Sahi told reporters at Polo Ground in Srinagar that youth who have been granted amnesty should take benefit of this “large-hearted” approach.


“It is a good step. It will encourage people to shun the path of violence. I wish and hope that people who have been granted amnesty should channelise their energy in a positive way,” said Sahi.

He also praised the efforts of the forces to wean off youth from militancy. “Off late, we have had success in this direction. Several people, including a footballer, shunned the path of violence and returned home,” said Sahi.

When asked about the killing of a woman Beauty Jan in alleged forces firing during Shopian gunfight, the top officer said that people need to follow the rule of law to avoid such killings.


“Rule of law is very important. Once the restrictions have been imposed in the area, it becomes imperative on the citizen to follow the instructions. Now, if the rule of law is not being followed and if somebody comes out and as you know that encounter is going on, the bullets are flying all over, there is a chance that it may hit somebody,” he said, adding that forces always maintain lot of restraint.



Video | Amnesty to stone-pelters in Kashmir will encourage youth to shun violence: IG CRPF
 

bonobashi

Well-Known member
Dec 3, 2017
889
410
The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir


by
Gaurav Arya


- Dec 10, 2017, 11:46 am

24​


SHARES​









[COLOR=rgba(54, 54, 52, 0.6)]The downtown Srinagar. (Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)​







Snapshot



  • There are many Kashmiris in the Valley who risk death everyday just to tell India’s story



“Jai Hind, sir. Someone wants to meet you. He says his name is Irfan Ahmad Lone and he is from downtown,” said the voice of the guard commander from the main gate.

“Jai Hind. Check identification and let him in. He can come to the Officers’ Mess lawn,” I responded. I was staying in Humhama, which is not far from Srinagar Airport.

“Identification checked, sir. He will reach you in three minutes. He is being escorted,” the soldier’s voice said, ever efficient. Soldiers like to give timelines, even when they are not required.

After what seemed like exactly three minutes, a soldier came to the Officers’ Mess lawns and with him came my visitor from downtown. Truth be told, downtown is not the nicest part of Srinagar. This is the separatist hub that sees massive stone pelting, suitably adorned with Pakistani and Islamic State flags.

My visitor had been calling me for the past few months wanting to know when I will be coming to Srinagar. I don’t know how Irfan got my phone number but he would call me every week from a different phone. Most calls I get from Kashmir are either inquisitive or hostile. This was neither. Irfan was extremely polite and would speak with the aap-janaab etiquette of old Lucknow.

He sat down shyly. The soldier saluted and left. Irfan was short and slim and sported a beard, as is the fashion in Kashmir these days. He wore jeans and a brown pullover.

I shook hands with Irfan and something seemed to be wrong with his right arm. It was not straight. Irfan saw me looking at his arm and smiled.

“Sir, they broke my arm. The doctor was too scared to treat me, and I guess my arm healed the wrong way,” he said in a very matter of fact voice.

“Who broke your arm, Irfan? And why?” I asked.

“Sir, the Hurriyat’s boys put my elbow between two bricks and someone kicked my elbow downwards. My arm snapped.”

“Why?” I asked perplexed.

“I was waving the tricolour,” Irfan laughed, his eyes dancing in the sunlight.

I asked him what he would like to have. Yes, you can have whatever you like. Coffee it was.

“Patriots are not respected in Kashmir, sir,” said Irfan. I listened as he went on in his slow drawl.

Irfan was a part of a small group of young men, all Kashmiri Muslims, who would spend their free time writing pro-India articles and posting them on anonymous Facebook accounts. To use one’s real name was to invite a painful death. There was an advocate from Pulwama, a merchant from Tral and a few others from Srinagar who comprised this motley group.

“We meet once every few months at my house to discuss strategy,” said Irfan in a voice dripping with what he thought was conspiracy.

I was intrigued. Why would a Kashmiri Muslim living in downtown Srinagar risk his life to write pro-India articles, I asked Irfan?

“India is not just your country. It is mine, too,” he said. Point taken.

“When I was in the army, I was armed and I had my soldiers. But you are out in the open, unarmed and alone. They will kill you,” I said.

“Then perhaps I am more Indian than you, Major sahib,” said Irfan laughing.

Yes. I remember my commanding officer telling me that you don’t have to wear a uniform to be a patriot.

We spoke about this and that, Irfan and I.

He told me that he had a few cracked ribs and four teeth missing. To drive home the point, he lifted his upper lip with his tongue and sure enough, a gaping hole greeted me.

I excused myself and went inside the Officers’ Mess. I called my police contact from downtown. I asked him about Irfan.

“You are sitting with pagal Irfan?” the policeman laughed loudly. It seemed that Irfan was known by his more famous nom de guerre of pagal Irfan, or mad Irfan.

“Janab, the only reason he is alive is that people think he is mad. Last time he went to Lal Chowk and got into a fistfight with a Hurriyat strongman. They almost lynched him. Junooni hai woh,” said the cop.

I walked back into the sunlight, welcoming the sudden warmth.

The waiter came, carrying coffee and cookies. Irfan took his cup of coffee and dipped a cookie in it, before putting it in his mouth. We had our coffee in silence.

We put down our cups. Irfan said that he wanted a favour. I told him that if I could do it, I would. So, what did he want?

“Tell people in Delhi that we may be few, but our faith is strong. But tell them to act fast. We have no support. Everyday we risk our lives to tell India’s story. I am not sure I will be alive when you come next,” said Irfan in a matter of fact tone.

“Take it easy for a few weeks. You have much work to do. If anything happens to you, your mission will be compromised,” I tried to reason with him.

“Life and death are in the hands of Allah, Major sahab. If he chooses death for me, so be it. He is munificent. He is merciful. And even if I die, I will be like Lt Umar Fayaz. He is a martyr and for many boys in Kashmir, he is a role model.”

Irfan got up to leave. I walked with him for a few minutes, to see him off.

“Will you be waving the tricolour again? Be careful,” I told him, smilingly.

Irfan gave me a wide smile, the beginning of which revealed the four missing teeth. He reached into his pocket and removed a clean, white handkerchief. He unfolded the handkerchief.

Inside the folds of the pure white cloth was a small tricolour.

He put the handkerchief back in his pocket. We shook hands and embraced. Irfan turned towards the massive iron-gate, adorned with concertina wire, and slowly walked out.

As I saw him exit, my mind went back to what the policeman from downtown had said about him.

Junooni hai wohpagal Irfan.

Disclaimer: Irfan’s real name has been withheld to protect him. There are many Kashmiri Muslims like Irfan in the Valley. They are largely unsupported and they risk death everyday, just to tell India’s story. They use false identities and names. They meet in secret at night. They put themselves and their families in danger, because they believe in India.

This article was originally published on Major Gaurav Aryasblogand has been republished here with permission.



Original Link: The Crazy Patriots Of Kashmir

[/COLOR]
The frustrating part is when people, both Indian and Pakistani, don't believe me when I say I know many such.

We have never treated the Kashmiri fairly; the patriotic ones are a thousand per cent more patriotic than any 'mainlander'.