US - Iran Flare Up

randomradio

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Nov 30, 2017
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The sanctions are definitely biting and as far as technological enhancements go, it's not as if Iran seeks technology for designing and fabricating chips. All the technology they've ever required for what they deem as necessary for their existence namely in manufacturing missiles, enriching uranium and designing the N bomb was achieved under the overhang of sanctions. It's not as if their patrons viz China or Russia are willing to transfer technology in advanced munitions and it's delivery platforms once sanctions are lifted. You're conflating two very different issues in order to show that sanctions in its current form or enhanced sanctions in the future will prove ineffectual in case of Iran which is clearly not the case.

Agreed. But even if the EU is against the unilateral withdrawal of the US from the N pact with Iran, it's companies are all going to comply with US sanctions. Not a single one is even contemplating insulating itself from US sanctions by continuation of trade with Iran. The same is true of the Chinese or Russians inspite of their deterioration of ties with the US.

You seem to be underestimating US power and overestimating the power of the Chinese and the Russians to combat such sanctions as well as the power of such sanctions in debilitating Iran and it's economy.

American sanctions can hurt daily life in Iran, but it will not erode Iran's military capabilities like it did against Iraq because of their indigenisation drive.

The problem for Iran is their economy was ridiculously weak even without the sanctions. They are already in the doghouse considering they have been in the FATF blacklist for over 10 years now, alongside N Korea.

Please refer to my statement once more. I clearly mentioned the US invasion of Iran whereas you seem determined to conflate my statement with India's reconquest of PoK.

I brought in Iran in order to show why the situation is similar to Pakistan. If the US can't deal with Iran conventionally without sacrifice, then expecting India to take POJK without sacrifice is impossible as well.
 

LoneWolfSandeep

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Dec 25, 2017
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It depends on what happens to Pakistan itself in just the next 5 years. But after 10 years or so, our Comprehensive National Power will be far greater than Pakistan's, to the point that we can execute any type of mission against Pakistan and succeed quite comfortably.



I was purely talking about a conventional war setting and not the politics behind it.

Iran is a very large country with a lot of people. The only way the US can win comfortably is if they decide to obliterate Iran in its entirety using nukes. Just hit every single settlement with a population over 10000 with a nuke and you're done. There are just 200 or so cities. Even then, this will not destroy the country itself.

But in a conventional setting, the US does not have the manpower necessary without invoking compulsory drafting. They will need millions of soldiers.
Agree Iran is a unique country, which can defend itself against a very strong country, purely by its geography.
iran.jpg

Iraq was run over easily, as from Kuwait, a narrow zone was to be controlled sequentially. But Iran is quite different, nothing short of a Million US troops will be able to do that to Iran. Reasons -
a) Iran is too wide & too spread out, being a huge country, even if you run over a area, you need to control it, else will turn into sniper & guerilla style warfare. With local support.
b) A thousand or 2 thousand mines in sea, spread out, will completely shut off Persian gulf & gulf of Oman. Grave consequence for world oil.
c) Attack from land routes are with very less options - Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Iraq are out of questions, due to logistics. Turkey has a habit of siding with Iran, against Saudi. Last time USA deployed forces in Saudi, their holy land, Al Qaida & Osama popped up as a direct result, No foreign force will be allowed to be in Saudi, with out Radical Wahabis bringing war to USA again. Pakistan cant afford to allow, else the costs to Pakistan be huge, they cant keep 2 side borders active & they be prey to Iranian missiles & shia rebels, not to forget Iran can seriously activate TTP horde against Pakistan.
d) Iran by simple using small boats & divers to plant mines both in sea & ships can cause havoc. having a 2440km coastline, again difficult to control & dominate, as too many choke points.
In short USA will need a million troops - will senate, congress, president sanction it. I don't think so, Neither will USA be foolish enough to initiate a nuclear war, just to change a regime.

In short, no war be possible - there is enough skepticism in USA alone, every one talks about the last time Bolton said of WMD in Iraq & other white elephants. UK has already declared it was a mistake, not likely to do it again. Europe & Russia, both were visited recently, gave a stern no of disapproval & participation.
 
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BMD

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Dec 4, 2017
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When Germany invaded France in WW-2 how many millions of soldiers were deployed? Ditto for Iraq in Gulf War -2. Granted it's not going to be easy invading and holding on to Iran, but you're being too optimistic in favour of the current regime surviving such an invasion and mounting an effective counter attack were it to happen.
You've actually made a valid point. Hitler didn't actually run a war economy with rations until 1942. Invading Iran would be easy, the problem comes thereafter but then it would arguably be easier than Iraq. In Iraq the problem was Sunni vs Shia, in Iran it is nearly 100% Shia, so could potentially be less problematic in many regards.
 

_Anonymous_

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You've actually made a valid point. Hitler didn't actually run a war economy with rations until 1942. Invading Iran would be easy, the problem comes thereafter but then it would arguably be easier than Iraq. In Iraq the problem was Sunni vs Shia, in Iran it is nearly 100% Shia, so could potentially be less problematic in many regards.
I think the emphasis here is on the fact that the incumbent regime enjoys great support. That's highly debatable. The US & it's allies could well not depose the regime but destroy pretty much everything of value a la Gulf War - 1, force disarmament, enforce a no flight zone and keep the Iranian regime under a tight leash a la Iraq under SH post Gulf War -1. In other words severely weaken it from within.

In Iraq, the US made a strategic blunder by disbanding the Iraqi Army. If you've read on the issue since 2003, you'd see many of them fuelled the insecurity the Sunnis felt in the aftermath of the deposing of the SH regime followed by the Shi'ites seizing power. The ISIS are also said to be composed to a large extent from remnants of the Iraqi Army.
 

BMD

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I think the emphasis here is on the fact that the incumbent regime enjoys great support. That's highly debatable. The US & it's allies could well not depose the regime but destroy pretty much everything of value a la Gulf War - 1, force disarmament, enforce a no flight zone and keep the Iranian regime under a tight leash a la Iraq under SH post Gulf War -1. In other words severely weaken it from within.

In Iraq, the US made a strategic blunder by disbanding the Iraqi Army. If you've read on the issue since 2003, you'd see many of them fuelled the insecurity the Sunnis felt in the aftermath of the deposing of the SH regime followed by the Shi'ites seizing power. The ISIS are also said to be composed to a large extent from remnants of the Iraqi Army.
Depends what you mean by 'regime'. I'm all for leaving the democratic part of the regime intact, it's just the Ayatollah that needs to go.
 

_Anonymous_

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Depends what you mean by 'regime'. I'm all for leaving the democratic part of the regime intact, it's just the Ayatollah that needs to go.
He commands the Revolutionary Guards. It's a veritable state within a state. Put another way, a civil war will divert their energies within else they will unleash hell in the neighborhood.
 

BMD

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Oil tanker 'on fire' after being hit by 'torpedo' in Gulf of Oman

Oil tanker 'on fire' after being hit by 'torpedo' in Gulf of Oman
Thursday 13 June 2019 09:40, UK



Image:The ships were reportedly attacked in the Gulf of Oman


A torpedo may have been used in an attack on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman.

One of the vessels - Front Altair - is "on fire and adrift", maritime intelligence firm Dryad Global said.

It is "suspected of being hit by a torpedo", Taiwan's state oil refiner, CPC Corp, said.

It was carrying 75,000 tonnes of a petrochemical feedstock called naphtha when it was attacked at 5am UK time, the company added.

Petrochemical division CEO, Wu I-Fang, said all 23 crew had been rescued.

The other tanker - Kokuka Courageous, which was carrying methanol - sustained damage to its starboard hull, the vessel's management said.

One crew member was slightly injured.
 

BMD

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Oil tankers hit in fresh 'attack' in Gulf of Oman amid Iran tensions

Oil tankers hit in fresh 'attack' in Gulf of Oman amid Iran tensions
Save

The US has been building up forces in the region for weeks CREDIT: MATT HERBST/ AFP

13 JUNE 2019 • 9:58AM
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Two oil tankers were hit in a suspected attack in the Gulf of Oman early on Thursday, causing oil prices to surge and raising the already heightened tensions in the Middle East.

The tankers were struck in the same area where the US accused Iran of using naval mines to sabotage four other oil ships in an attack last month.

One of the ships, the Norwegian-owned Front Altair, was "suspected of being hit by a torpedo”, according to Taiwan’s state-owned petrol company. The ship was on fire, its owners said.

The second tanker, Kokuka Courageous, was damaged in a "suspected attack" that breached the hull above the water line while on passage from Saudi Arabia to Singapore, according to Bernhard Schulte Ship management.

The company said the ship was safely afloat.

Oil prices jumped by 4 per cent in response to reports of the attack.

The US Navy said it was helping to evacuate the two damaged tankers and the shipping companies said the crews of both ships were safe.

A US Navy spokesman said: "We are aware of the reported attack on shipping vessels in the Gulf of Oman. US Naval Forces in the region received two separate distress calls at 6:12 a.m. local (Bahrain) time and a second one at 7:00 a.m. U.S. Navy ships are in the area and are rendering assistance."

The UK Maritime Trade Operations (UKTMO), a unit of the Royal Navy, said it was aware of an incident in the area but gave no further details. “UK and its partners are currently investigating,” UKTMO said.

The alleged attack happened outside the Strait of Hormuz, the strategic waterway between Iran and Oman through which around 20 per cent of all the world’s oil is transported.

Neither the shipping companies nor the US Navy made any immediate accusations but early suspicions will fall on Iran.

The US has accused accused Iran of sabotaging two oil tankers and two smaller ships near the Emirati port of Fujairah using naval mines on May 12. Iran denied responsibility for the attack.

The latest incident comes amid weeks of heightened tensions between the US and Iran.

The US has been building up forces in the Middle East since early May, when the White House said it had evidence that Iran was preparing attacks against American troops in the region.

US intelligence agencies were alarmed by photographs or Iranian forces loading armed missiles onto small boats in the Persian Gulf.

US intelligence also reportedly picked up evidence that Iran had activated Shia militias in Iraq to carry out attacks against American forces and diplomatic facilities.

Since then the US has sent an aircraft carrier, 1,500 additional troops, a bomber task force and several batteries of missile interceptors to the region.

Donald Trump has repeatedly said he is not looking to provoke a war with Iran but the UK and other allies fear that the two sides could stumble into an unintended conflict.

Meanwhile, Shinzo Abe, the prime minister of Japan, is visiting Iran. The trip is officially commemorating 90 years of diplomatic relations between Iran and Japan but Mr Abe has also said he is eager to try to calm tensions between the two sides.



John Bolton, the US national security advisor, accused Iran of being behind previous attacks CREDIT:REUTERS/JOSHUA ROBERTS/FILE PHOTO


Auto update

On9:58amUS Navy response
A US Navy spokesman said: "We are aware of the reported attack on shipping vessels in the Gulf of Oman.

"US Naval Forces in the region received two separate distress calls at 6.12am local (Bahrain) time and a second one at 7am US Navy ships are in the area and are rendering assistance."

9:56amAlmost 50 crew taken to Iranian port
Forty-four crew members from two tankers involved in an incident near the Strait of Hormuz have been taken to an Iranian port, according to Iran state TV.

9:55amFirst picture of tanker emerges
A Saudi news outlet has claimed to have obtained the first photograph of one of the tankers hit by a suspected attack in the Gulf of Oman.

View image on Twitter


Amichai Stein@AmichaiStein1
Saudi @AlHadath claims this is a pictures of one of the oil tankers on fire
99:20 AM - Jun 13, 2019
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الحدث@AlHadath
الصور الأولى لناقلة النفط التي تم استهدافها في خليج عُمان
859:31 AM - Jun 13, 2019
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9:51amOne of the oil tankers 'sinks'
One of the two oil tankers hit by explosions in a suspected attack has sunk, according to reports.

Kann - the public broadcaster in Israel - said that the vessel had gone underwater, but that the crew had been saved.

Amichai Stein@AmichaiStein1
#BREAKING: One of the two tankers attacked today has sunk. All crew members are safe.
1309:13 - 13 Jun 2019Twitter Ads information and privacy
36 people are talking about this9:44amSurge in oil prices after 'suspected attack'
Oil prices have bounced back from a five-month low after a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the Sea of Oman as geopolitical tensions simmer in the region, writes Tom Rees from our Business Desk.

Price suddenly surged after the US Navy revealed that two tankers were damaged near the Strait of Hormuz, a crucial waterway that transports a fifth of the world's oil.

Iran has threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz after its oil exports were hit by American sanctions and the latest incident in the region comes shortly after two Saudi tankers were sabotaged in an attack the US has blamed on Tehran.

Prices slumped yesterday after another unexpected rise in US crude stockpiles compounded fears of stuttering demand. The rise in tensions helped oil stage a recovery as prices surged as much as 4.5pc to above $62 per barrel in its biggest intraday jump in five months.
 
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Oil tankers hit in fresh 'attack' in Gulf of Oman amid Iran tensions

Oil tankers hit in fresh 'attack' in Gulf of Oman amid Iran tensions
Save

The US has been building up forces in the region for weeks CREDIT: MATT HERBST/ AFP

13 JUNE 2019 • 9:58AM
Follow

Two oil tankers were hit in a suspected attack in the Gulf of Oman early on Thursday, causing oil prices to surge and raising the already heightened tensions in the Middle East.

The tankers were struck in the same area where the US accused Iran of using naval mines to sabotage four other oil ships in an attack last month.

One of the ships, the Norwegian-owned Front Altair, was "suspected of being hit by a torpedo”, according to Taiwan’s state-owned petrol company. The ship was on fire, its owners said.

The second tanker, Kokuka Courageous, was damaged in a "suspected attack" that breached the hull above the water line while on passage from Saudi Arabia to Singapore, according to Bernhard Schulte Ship management.

The company said the ship was safely afloat.

Oil prices jumped by 4 per cent in response to reports of the attack.

The US Navy said it was helping to evacuate the two damaged tankers and the shipping companies said the crews of both ships were safe.

A US Navy spokesman said: "We are aware of the reported attack on shipping vessels in the Gulf of Oman. US Naval Forces in the region received two separate distress calls at 6:12 a.m. local (Bahrain) time and a second one at 7:00 a.m. U.S. Navy ships are in the area and are rendering assistance."

The UK Maritime Trade Operations (UKTMO), a unit of the Royal Navy, said it was aware of an incident in the area but gave no further details. “UK and its partners are currently investigating,” UKTMO said.

The alleged attack happened outside the Strait of Hormuz, the strategic waterway between Iran and Oman through which around 20 per cent of all the world’s oil is transported.

Neither the shipping companies nor the US Navy made any immediate accusations but early suspicions will fall on Iran.

The US has accused accused Iran of sabotaging two oil tankers and two smaller ships near the Emirati port of Fujairah using naval mines on May 12. Iran denied responsibility for the attack.

The latest incident comes amid weeks of heightened tensions between the US and Iran.

The US has been building up forces in the Middle East since early May, when the White House said it had evidence that Iran was preparing attacks against American troops in the region.

US intelligence agencies were alarmed by photographs or Iranian forces loading armed missiles onto small boats in the Persian Gulf.

US intelligence also reportedly picked up evidence that Iran had activated Shia militias in Iraq to carry out attacks against American forces and diplomatic facilities.

Since then the US has sent an aircraft carrier, 1,500 additional troops, a bomber task force and several batteries of missile interceptors to the region.

Donald Trump has repeatedly said he is not looking to provoke a war with Iran but the UK and other allies fear that the two sides could stumble into an unintended conflict.

Meanwhile, Shinzo Abe, the prime minister of Japan, is visiting Iran. The trip is officially commemorating 90 years of diplomatic relations between Iran and Japan but Mr Abe has also said he is eager to try to calm tensions between the two sides.



John Bolton, the US national security advisor, accused Iran of being behind previous attacks CREDIT:REUTERS/JOSHUA ROBERTS/FILE PHOTO


Auto update

On9:58amUS Navy response
A US Navy spokesman said: "We are aware of the reported attack on shipping vessels in the Gulf of Oman.

"US Naval Forces in the region received two separate distress calls at 6.12am local (Bahrain) time and a second one at 7am US Navy ships are in the area and are rendering assistance."

9:56amAlmost 50 crew taken to Iranian port
Forty-four crew members from two tankers involved in an incident near the Strait of Hormuz have been taken to an Iranian port, according to Iran state TV.

9:55amFirst picture of tanker emerges
A Saudi news outlet has claimed to have obtained the first photograph of one of the tankers hit by a suspected attack in the Gulf of Oman.

View image on Twitter



Saudi @AlHadath claims this is a pictures of one of the oil tankers on fire​

See Amichai Stein's other Tweets
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Watch the Saudi news report here:




الصور الأولى لناقلة النفط التي تم استهدافها في خليج عُمان​

70 people are talking about this
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9:51amOne of the oil tankers 'sinks'
One of the two oil tankers hit by explosions in a suspected attack has sunk, according to reports.

Kann - the public broadcaster in Israel - said that the vessel had gone underwater, but that the crew had been saved.


#BREAKING: One of the two tankers attacked today has sunk. All crew members are safe.​

36 people are talking about this9:44amSurge in oil prices after 'suspected attack'
Oil prices have bounced back from a five-month low after a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the Sea of Oman as geopolitical tensions simmer in the region, writes Tom Rees from our Business Desk.

Price suddenly surged after the US Navy revealed that two tankers were damaged near the Strait of Hormuz, a crucial waterway that transports a fifth of the world's oil.

Iran has threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz after its oil exports were hit by American sanctions and the latest incident in the region comes shortly after two Saudi tankers were sabotaged in an attack the US has blamed on Tehran.

Prices slumped yesterday after another unexpected rise in US crude stockpiles compounded fears of stuttering demand. The rise in tensions helped oil stage a recovery as prices surged as much as 4.5pc to above $62 per barrel in its biggest intraday jump in five months.
Sometimes it looks like US desperately want oil prices to be up, every time oil prices weaken US do one thing or other to inflate them. Walking out of deals, attacking nations, sabotage, terrorist attacks all coincidentally happen when oil goes down.

Looks like ground is being prepared to attack Iran.
 

BMD

Senior member
Dec 4, 2017
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Sometimes it looks like US desperately want oil prices to be up, every time oil prices weaken US do one thing or other to inflate them. Walking out of deals, attacking nations, sabotage, terrorist attacks all coincidentally happen when oil goes down.

Looks like ground is being prepared to attack Iran.
Nah, the US wants oil prices down, its economy prefers cheap oil for industry. Russia likes it high because their economy is oil dependent, and Venezuela even more so.
 

BMD

Senior member
Dec 4, 2017
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Tensions rise over oil tanker attacks as US releases video showing 'Iranian patrol boat' near one of the vessels

Tensions rise over oil tanker attacks as US releases video showing 'Iranian patrol boat' near one of the vessels


Video purports to show Iran removing ship mine

Tensions continue to rise over the alleged attack by Iran on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman as the US military released video footage that it claims shows an Iranian military patrol boat approach one of the vessels.

The footage was released as Britain backed the US in its assessment that Iran was responsible for the suspected attacks on two tankers in the Gulf of Oman.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt warned Tehran that if it is proven to be behind the incident it would be a "deeply unwise escalation which poses a real danger to the prospects of peace and stability in the region".

In the early hours of Friday morning, the US military released a video that it claims shows an unexploded limpet mine being removed from one of the tankers, the Kokuka Courageous.

The black-and-white footage captured by a US aircraft shows a boat, said to be a Revolutionary Guard patrol ship, approaching the tanker.



A picture released by U.S. Central Command shows damage from an explosion (left) and a likely limpet mine, on the hull of the civilian vessel M/V Kokuka Courageous in the Gulf of Oman (Picture: US Navy/Handout via REUTERS)More
However, the owner of the Japanese oil tanker said US reports provided “false” information.

The ship operator said “flying objects” that may have been bullets were the cause of damage to the vessel, rather than mines used by Iranian forces, as the US has suggested.

Yutaka Katada, chief executive of the company operating the Kokuka Courageous, one of the two ships attacked, said damage could not have been caused by mines or torpedos, since the damage was reportedly above the ship’s waterline, not below.

Iran has rejected accusations by US secretary of state Mike Pompeo that it was responsible.

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Mr Pompeo said on Twitter: "These attacks are a threat to international peace and security, a blatant assault on the freedom of navigation, and an unacceptable escalation of tension by Iran."

However Iran's foreign minister, Javad Zarif, hit back, writing on Twitter that the US had "immediately jumped to make allegations against Iran-w/o a shred of factual or circumstantial evidence".

View image on Twitter


It is the assessment of the U.S. government that Iran is responsible for today's attacks in the Gulf of Oman. These attacks are a threat to international peace and security, a blatant assault on the freedom of navigation, and an unacceptable escalation of tension by Iran.​
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BlackOpsIndia

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Tensions rise over oil tanker attacks as US releases video showing 'Iranian patrol boat' near one of the vessels

Tensions rise over oil tanker attacks as US releases video showing 'Iranian patrol boat' near one of the vessels


Video purports to show Iran removing ship mine

Tensions continue to rise over the alleged attack by Iran on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman as the US military released video footage that it claims shows an Iranian military patrol boat approach one of the vessels.

The footage was released as Britain backed the US in its assessment that Iran was responsible for the suspected attacks on two tankers in the Gulf of Oman.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt warned Tehran that if it is proven to be behind the incident it would be a "deeply unwise escalation which poses a real danger to the prospects of peace and stability in the region".

In the early hours of Friday morning, the US military released a video that it claims shows an unexploded limpet mine being removed from one of the tankers, the Kokuka Courageous.

The black-and-white footage captured by a US aircraft shows a boat, said to be a Revolutionary Guard patrol ship, approaching the tanker.



A picture released by U.S. Central Command shows damage from an explosion (left) and a likely limpet mine, on the hull of the civilian vessel M/V Kokuka Courageous in the Gulf of Oman (Picture: US Navy/Handout via REUTERS)More
However, the owner of the Japanese oil tanker said US reports provided “false” information.

The ship operator said “flying objects” that may have been bullets were the cause of damage to the vessel, rather than mines used by Iranian forces, as the US has suggested.

Yutaka Katada, chief executive of the company operating the Kokuka Courageous, one of the two ships attacked, said damage could not have been caused by mines or torpedos, since the damage was reportedly above the ship’s waterline, not below.

Iran has rejected accusations by US secretary of state Mike Pompeo that it was responsible.

READ MORE

Tory leadership rivals ambush Boris Johnson over TV hustings

Boy, 17, pleads guilty to murdering teenager in the street with 'Rambo' knife

Mr Pompeo said on Twitter: "These attacks are a threat to international peace and security, a blatant assault on the freedom of navigation, and an unacceptable escalation of tension by Iran."

However Iran's foreign minister, Javad Zarif, hit back, writing on Twitter that the US had "immediately jumped to make allegations against Iran-w/o a shred of factual or circumstantial evidence".

View image on Twitter



It is the assessment of the U.S. government that Iran is responsible for today's attacks in the Gulf of Oman. These attacks are a threat to international peace and security, a blatant assault on the freedom of navigation, and an unacceptable escalation of tension by Iran.​

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Any credible proof that boat was Iranian? With light, camera, action it looks very suspicious setup and fits perfectly well into dirty tricks employed by US time and again.

EDIT-
Screenshot_2019-06-15-19-14-08-1986933321.png

This is the current map of ships in that area, how come camera came to know where to point and exactly when with so many targets? This was Japanese ship shouldn't US and Europe Ships be the primary target for monitoring?
 

_Anonymous_

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Dec 4, 2017
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Any credible proof that boat was Iranian? With light, camera, action it looks very suspicious setup and fits perfectly well into dirty tricks employed by US time and again.

EDIT-
View attachment 7378
This is the current map of ships in that area, how come camera came to know where to point and exactly when with so many targets? This was Japanese ship shouldn't US and Europe Ships be the primary target for monitoring?
It's a frame up. Simple as that. Why would Iran resort to such measures with its back against the wall and knowing full well, any such act in today's circumstances clearly invites suspicion on them.

The question is after issuing footage like this, what would the US reaction be? Are they planning on destroying Iranian coastal defences or it's Navy? Coz with the forces deployed there, nothing more than that seems possible.
 
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BlackOpsIndia

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It's a frame up. Simple as that. Why would Iran resort to such measures with its back against the wall and knowing full well, any such act in today's circumstances clearly invites suspicion on them.

The question is after issuing footage like this, what would the US reaction be? Are they planning on destroying Iranian coastal defences or it's Navy? Coz with the forces deployed there, nothing more than that seems possible.
Told you once after Mattis is gone White House will be packed with Iran Hawks, remember that discussion? Things are going in one particular direction from long and everyday they are more close to direct conflict.
 
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BMD

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Dec 4, 2017
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Any credible proof that boat was Iranian? With light, camera, action it looks very suspicious setup and fits perfectly well into dirty tricks employed by US time and again.

EDIT-
View attachment 7378
This is the current map of ships in that area, how come camera came to know where to point and exactly when with so many targets? This was Japanese ship shouldn't US and Europe Ships be the primary target for monitoring?
And of course, nobody else plays dirty tricks, nobody like Iran, a sponsor of Hezbollah and the Houthis and Al-Quaeda (when it suits its agenda).

Security camera on a nearby ship probably.

Trump really does not want a war, it was expressed in his campaign and he has fairly vehemently strived to stick to that. If not Iran, there are other actors in the region and elsewhere who might like to stir up a conflict between the US and Iran - ISIS, Al-Quaeda, Al-Nusra, Houthis, China*, Russia*.

* Keep the US engaged in a war while they gain ground militarily, while also selling arms to Iran, higher oil prices for Russia too, which also helps their ally Venezuela and hinders US/Europe economically.

And the reason these other parties can do this is because they know that after the Iraq WMDs, people like you will immediately accuse the US.
 
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