United States Military Aviation

BMD

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Here’s the first look at the Sikorsky-Boeing Defiant helicopter

Here’s the first look at the Sikorsky-Boeing Defiant helicopter
By: Jill Aitoro   20 hours ago6.7K98
B66P23SDNVAN7F3O2UOOYOKBR4.jpg
Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the new Defiant helicopter, one of two designs participating in the Army’s Joint Multi-Role-Medium Technology Demonstrator Program. (Courtesy Sikorsky-Boeing Team)
WASHINGTON — Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the Defiant helicopter, one of two designs competing under the U.S. Army’s Joint Multi-Role technology demonstrator program, two weeks after confirming the first flight would be delayed until 2019.

The Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator effort will inform requirements for the U.S. Army’s FVL family of systems, which will come online in the 2030s.

heres-the-first-look-at-the-sikorsky-boeing-defiant-helicopter
Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the new Defiant helicopter. The aircraft’s rotor system will allow it to fly about twice as fast and twice as far as today’s conventional helicopters. (Courtesy Sikorsky-Boeing Team)

The Defiant is designed to fly at twice the speed and range of today’s conventional helicopters and offers advanced agility and maneuverability, according to the Sikorsky-Boeing team. Data from the Defiant will help the Army develop requirements for new utility helicopters expected to enter service in the early 2030s.

The Defiant’s first flight was bumped to 2019 following a technical issue discovered during ground tests. Competitor Bell’s V-280 Valor tilt-rotor aircraft has been flying since December 2017.
 

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Here’s the first look at the Sikorsky-Boeing Defiant helicopter

Here’s the first look at the Sikorsky-Boeing Defiant helicopter
By: Jill Aitoro   20 hours ago6.7K98
B66P23SDNVAN7F3O2UOOYOKBR4.jpg
Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the new Defiant helicopter, one of two designs participating in the Army’s Joint Multi-Role-Medium Technology Demonstrator Program. (Courtesy Sikorsky-Boeing Team)
WASHINGTON — Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the Defiant helicopter, one of two designs competing under the U.S. Army’s Joint Multi-Role technology demonstrator program, two weeks after confirming the first flight would be delayed until 2019.

The Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator effort will inform requirements for the U.S. Army’s FVL family of systems, which will come online in the 2030s.

heres-the-first-look-at-the-sikorsky-boeing-defiant-helicopter
Sikorsky and Boeing provided the first look at the new Defiant helicopter. The aircraft’s rotor system will allow it to fly about twice as fast and twice as far as today’s conventional helicopters. (Courtesy Sikorsky-Boeing Team)

The Defiant is designed to fly at twice the speed and range of today’s conventional helicopters and offers advanced agility and maneuverability, according to the Sikorsky-Boeing team. Data from the Defiant will help the Army develop requirements for new utility helicopters expected to enter service in the early 2030s.

The Defiant’s first flight was bumped to 2019 following a technical issue discovered during ground tests. Competitor Bell’s V-280 Valor tilt-rotor aircraft has been flying since December 2017.

How much of an internal payload/volume difference is there between this and the Black Hawk?
 

BMD

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How much of an internal payload/volume difference is there between this and the Black Hawk?
50% larger cabin, 60% longer range, 100kts faster, 50% better high and hot hover performance. Can't find anything on weights but better hover performance suggests it should be capable of a greater load too.
 

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Take In These Gorgeous Photos Of A B-2 And F-22s Soaring Together Over Hawaii


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TYLER ROGOWAYView Tyler Rogoway's Articles

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Just two days ago we showcased some beautiful pictures of Marine One creating its own blizzard as it touched down on the White House's snowy lawn. Now we go from frigid to warm with pictures that showcase American air power in pretty much the exact opposite climate.

B-2 Spirit stealth bombers, which call Whiteman Air Force in Missouri home, are back at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii to fulfill U.S. Strategic Command's bomber task force power projection mission to the Pacific. B-2s regularly rotate through the Indo-Pacific region to train with forward-deployed U.S. assets and allies. They also bring the USAF's hardest-hitting and most coveted combat capability to a tense region.

STEALTH PUSHES FORWARD: B-2S REFUEL ON WAKE ISLAND, F-22S FLY FROM AUSTERE BASE IN MIDEASTBy Tyler RogowayPosted in THE WAR ZONE

TWO "MIGHTY MOS": SUBMARINE USS MISSOURI MEETS ITS BATTLESHIP NAMESAKE IN HAWAIIBy Tyler RogowayPosted in THE WAR ZONE

HAWKER HUNTER PRIVATE AGGRESSOR JET HAS GONE DOWN OFF OAHU, HAWAII (UPDATED)By Tyler RogowayPosted in THE WAR ZONE

LOOK BACK AT THE BIRTH OF THE B-2 SPIRIT STEALTH BOMBER IN THIS INTIMATE NEW VIDEO SERIESBy Tyler RogowayPosted in THE WAR ZONE

GORGEOUS SHOTS OF MARINE ONE CREATING ITS OWN BLIZZARD ON THE WHITE HOUSE'S SNOWY SOUTH LAWNBy Tyler RogowayPosted in THE WAR ZONE

Based permanently at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam is the 199th Fighter Squadron and their F-22A Raptors. B-2s and F-22s are part of an already highly integrated, deep penetrating, air combat team, so any time training opportunities present themselves, Raptors and Spirits hit the skies. Thankfully, a recent sortie over the island paradise included a series of photo ops from multiple angles as a formation of F-22s and a B-2 flew low over some of Oahu's most prominent landmarks, including Waikiki's Beach and Diamond Head, as well as high over the Pacific to get gas from a local KC-135Rs belonging to the 203rd Air Refueling Squadron.

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USAF B-2As MYTEE21, 22, & 23 departed Whiteman AFB en route to Hickam AFB, Honolulu.

USAF KC-10As QUAKE52, 53, & 54 provided support and are returning to Travis.
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Check out the gorgeous results of mixing America's most potent aerial weaponry, a camera's lens, and some incredible backdrops that only Hawaii can provide:

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BMD

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Bell V-280 hits 280kt speed goal

Bell V-280 hits 280kt speed goal
  • 25 JANUARY, 2019
  • SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM
  • BY: DOMINIC PERRY
  • LONDON
Bell has hit its target speed of 280kt (518km/h) with the V-280 tiltrotor in a little over a year since the technology demonstrator performed its first flight.

The airframer says it will continue to expand the aircraft's flight envelope, as it eyes the US Army's Future Vertical Lift (FVL) programme.

"It is a remarkable achievement to hit this airspeed for the V-280 Valor in just over a year of flight testing," says Keith Flail, vice-president of advanced vertical lift systems at Bell.

"Beyond the exemplary speed and agility of this aircraft, this significant milestone is yet another proof point that the V-280 is mature technology, and the future is now for FVL capability set 3."

That refers to the V-280's size class, which is meant to replace the army's fleet of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks.

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Bell

Although that had seemed to be the service's priority, conflicting messages had come from the army over recent years, suggesting that a smaller armed scout helicopter – or capability set 1 - would instead be given precedence.

However, a report into the army's modernisation programme, released by the US Government Accountability Office in early January, puts both capability sets on an equal footing. It gives a service entry date of 2028 for aircraft addressing both missions.

Bell says future tests with the V-280 will focus on low-speed agility, angles of bank, and autonomous operations.

The Valor first flew in December 2017. It faces competition from a combined Boeing-Sikorsky team, which is building the SB-1 Defiant. However, that aircraft is yet to fly and is over a year behind schedule.
 

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BMD

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Raytheon looks to install F-35’s DAS on helicopters

The Advanced Distributed Aperture System was designed to function similarly, allowing pilots to artificially see through the helicopter's cockpit floor or behind to the tail rotor.

“Pilots now have a 360° view of their surroundings. Multiple infrared cameras and projected graphics enable aircrews to act quickly while staying out of danger,” the company said in 2012 marketing materials. “When landing in tight quarters [the Advanced Distributed Aperture System] enables pilots to see through brownouts of blowing dust, maneuver around poles, trees and wires, and safely drop into confined areas.”

The system also incorporated a kind of 3-D audio, which is meant to help pilots keep track of different warning and alert notifications, by assigning the noises various positions around a pilot’s head.

“During an attack, visual cues and 3-D audio tell the pilot the kind and relative position of incoming weapons,” says the marketing material.
 

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U.S. Test Launches LGM-30G Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM)

 

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Conventional Rotary Launcher Upgrade Tested

Conventional Rotary Launcher Upgrade Tested

(Source: US Air Force; issued Feb 15, 2019)


Airmen unload an AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile from a B-52 bomber’s Conventional Rotary Launcher. The munitions were loaded to test whether the weapons platform could power on eight JASSMs at one time. (USAF photo)

BARKSDALE AFB, La. --- An upgrade to the B-52 Stratofortress and the Conventional Rotary Launcher was tested, Feb. 11. The change is designed to increase mission flexibility and make the B-52 more lethal in a combat environment.

The CRL, a weapons system designed for the B-52, can carry a variety of munitions, allowing for greater mission flexibility. However, it is limited to supplying power to only four munitions at a time.

Maj. Jason McCargar, a 49th Test and Evaluation Squadron unit project officer, said the new rendition can nearly double the number of weapons that can be powered at one time.

The improved efficiency has the potential to lower risk in combat environments, increase the number of weapons in theater of operations and lower the number of aircraft needed for missions.

“The Conventional Rotary Launcher has a high-power draw, so an aircrew could only power up four munitions at a time without risking blowing circuit breakers in mid-flight,” said McCargar. “With this upgrade, it can now have eight ready at once.”

Senior Master Sgt. Michael Pierce, 307th Maintenance Squadron aircraft armament superintendent, was part of the effort to bring the CRL online at Barksdale AFB in 2017. He said the ability to carry a full power load to all munitions on the CRL, in addition to another 12 under the B-52’s wings, has the potential to improve the jet’s lethality in combat.

“Now, a B-52 going into a war zone has the ability to put 20 munitions on a target area very quickly,” he said. “Before, they would have to drop some of their munitions, power up the CRL again and then make another pass.”

In addition to being able to deliver more munitions in less time, the modified CRL can also carry greater payloads of specific kinds of munitions. Reserve Citizen Airmen from the 307th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron loaded eight AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles on the CRL as part of the testing.

“The entire effort to modify the CRL moved pretty quickly,” said Pierce. “The bottom line is yesterday we had the capability to deliver 16 weapons at one time and today we can deliver 20 of them.”

Once testing is complete, the rest other CRL’s in the Air Force inventory will be modified to the specifications of the test launcher.