Pakistan Navy: News & Discussions

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
4,720
7,686
Bangalore
PN commissions 3000 ton survey ship PeNiS Behr Masah

The Pakistan Navy (PN) has commissioned a new 3,000-ton survey ship named PNS Behr Masah .

The 80.8 m-long vessel, which was built in China by Jiangsu Dajin Heavy Industry, entered service in a ceremony held on 4 November at the Karachi Naval Dockyard, which was also attended by Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral Zafar Mahmood Abbasi.

The contract for the construction of Behr Masah , which is now the largest survey vessel operated by the PN, was signed in mid-2017, with the ship being launched in December 2018.

The vessel, which is reportedly capable of operating at sea for 50 days, has been equipped with “state-of-the-art equipment” and is capable of undertaking “hydrographic, oceanographic and geographical surveys as well as seafloor mapping from shallow to ocean depths”, said the PN in a statement published on its Facebook page the same day.
 

lingesh92

Member
Mar 14, 2019
44
40
Chennai
Pakistan Navy commissions first of two 2,300 ton multirole corvettes

Pakistan Navy (PN) has commissioned the first of two 2,300 tonnes multirole corvettes ordered from Dutch shipbuilder Damen in 2017.

Named PNS ‘Yarmook’ (F-271), the ship, which the company said is based on a Damen Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) 1900, entered serviced in a ceremony held on 13 February at Constanta Port in Romania that was also attended by the PN's Vice Chief of the Naval Staff Vice Admiral Muhammad Fayyaz Gilani.

In a 14 February statement Damen said that ‘Yarmook’, which had been launched on 17 May 2019 at the company's facilities in Galati, Romania, is capable of performing "a variety of maritime operations" and can transport both a helicopter and an unmanned aerial vehicle. The ship, which can also carry two high-speed rigid-hulled inflatable boats - of 11.5 m and 6.5 m in length - has a capacity of two twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) for special mission operations.

The second vessel of the class, ‘Tabuk’, which was launched on 3 September 2019, is set to enter service in May.

The Dutch shipbuilder had signed a contract with Pakistan's Ministry of Defence Production on 30 June 2017 to build two multipurpose OPVs for the PN.

PN officials had previously stated that these vessels "will act as force multipliers in enhancing [the] navy's capability of safeguarding maritime frontiers and will offer more flexibility in the conduct of [the] Pakistan Navy's initiative of independent Regional Maritime Security Patrols in the Indian Ocean Region".
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
4,720
7,686
Bangalore

The Pakistan Navy (PN) has commissioned the first of two 2,300 tonnes multirole corvettes ordered from Dutch shipbuilder Damen in 2017.

Named PNS Yarmook (F-271), the ship, which the company said is based on a Damen Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) 1900, entered serviced in a ceremony held on 13 February at Constanta Port in Romania that was also attended by the PN's Vice Chief of the Naval Staff Vice Admiral Muhammad Fayyaz Gilani.

In a 14 February statement Damen said that Yarmook, which had been launched on 17 May 2019 at the company's facilities in Galati, Romania, is capable of performing "a variety of maritime operations" and can transport both a helicopter and an unmanned aerial vehicle.

The ship, which can also carry two high-speed rigid-hulled inflatable boats - of 11.5 m and 6.5 m in length - has a capacity of two twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) for special mission operations.

The second vessel of the class, Tabuk, which was launched on 3 September 2019, is set to enter service in May.

The Dutch shipbuilder had signed a contract with Pakistan's Ministry of Defence Production on 30 June 2017 to build two multipurpose OPVs for the PN.

PN officials had previously stated that these vessels "will act as force multipliers in enhancing [the] navy's capability of safeguarding maritime frontiers and will offer more flexibility in the conduct of [the] Pakistan Navy's initiative of independent Regional Maritime Security Patrols in the Indian Ocean Region".

Pakistan Navy commissions first of two 2,300 tonne corvettes | Jane's 360

For PN, OPV design is called a corvette. #justsaying
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
4,720
7,686
Bangalore
PNS Yarmook-a force multiplier for PN


Pakistan Navy (PN), which has been entrusted with the sacred task of defending Pakistan’s maritime frontiers, has recently commissioned a state-of-the-art 2300 Tons Corvette Pakistan Navy Ship (PNS) Yarmook. The corvette is the first of two manufactured by the Dutch ship manufacturing company M/s Damen Shipyards, which built the corvette at its yard in Galati in Romania.

M/s Damen signed the contract with Pakistan’s Ministry of Defence Production for two multipurpose Offshore Petrol Vessels (OPV), for PN on 30th June 2017 following a tender process. The facility has built nearly 40 vessels for the defence and security division, including the last seven complex naval vessels for the Royal Netherlands Navy and the Stefan cel Mare offshore patrol vessel, the flagship of the Romanian Border Police.

PNS Yarmook is a state-of-the-art electronic warfare, anti-ship and anti-submarine warfare platform with cutting edge self-protection and terminal defence systems. M/s Damen will deliver the Second vessel PNS Tabuk (Designate) in May this year. PNS Yarmook is capable of performing a variety of maritime operations and can transport both a helicopter and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The ship can also launch two high speed Rigid Hull Inflatable boats (RHIB) simultaneously and also has the capability to accommodate two 20-foot-long containers for special mission-based operations.

Vessels in PN are named after historical figures or names. PNS Yarmouk has been named to commemorate the Battle of Yarmook between the Muslim Army led by Khalid bin Waleed and the Byzantine army led by Theodore Trithyrius in 636 AD. The Muslim victory routed the Byzantine Empire in Syria.

PN, which made a humble start with Pakistan’s Independence on 14 August 1947, has become a combat ready multi-dimensional force manned by highly motivated and professionally competent human resource imbued with unwavering faith in the Almighty and national cause. It contributes effectively to credible deterrence, national security and maritime economy, safeguarding Pakistan’s maritime interests while radiating influence in the region with global outlook.

Corvettes are small ships; whose forerunner was the sloop. The role of the corvette initially consisted mostly of coastal patrol, fighting minor wars, supporting large fleets, or participating in show-the-flag missions. The modern corvette appeared during World War II as an easily built patrol and convoy escort vessel. Modern navies began a trend in the late 20th and early 21st centuries towards smaller more maneuverable surface capability. Corvettes have a displacement between 500 and 3,000 long tons and measure 180-420 ft (55-128 m) in length. They are usually armed with medium- and small-caliber guns, surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles and anti-submarine weapons. Modern corvettes can accommodate a small or medium anti-submarine warfare helicopter. Indian Navy operates four Kamorta-class corvettes.

It is praiseworthy that besides guarding the maritime frontiers of Pakistan, PN has picked up the cudgel to conduct peacetime missions comprising hydrography and bathometry​
Pakistan Navy, despite being the smallest service in Pakistan, is responsible for the most onerous task of protecting maritime interests of Pakistan, deter aggression at and from sea, provide disaster relief, participate in development of coastal communities and contribute to international efforts in maintaining good order at sea and keeping the Sea Lines of Communication (SLOC).

Not withstanding the fact that some land lubbers ruling Pakistan did not appreciate the role of a maritime force and even considered downsizing it, PN has given a good account of itself in the 1965 Pakistan-India War, in which the sole PN Submarine Ghazi kept the Indian Navy at bay while PN surface fleets pounded the Indian Naval port of Dwarka. It is ironic that Indian Naval strategist K.M. Panikkar, in his 1951publication India and the Indian Ocean: An Essay on the Influence of Sea Power on Indian History, had visualized that Pakistan will have two navies, one for the defence of West and the other for East Pakistan. Had we heeded this pearl of wisdom, we would have avoided the naval blockade of East Pakistan in 1971, which sealed the fate of our eastern wing.

Luckily, later dispensations in the corridors of power in Islamabad, gave due importance to the Naval arm of the armed forces of Pakistan. Thus, PN has been able to build a modest force comprising surface, sub-surface and aerial complements.

Nature has endowed Pakistan with huge maritime potentials and there is a dire need to explore and tap these resources. PN’s responsibility has multiplied manifold by the expansion of Pakistan’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) till 350 Nautical Miles from Pakistan’s Coast i.e. Extended Continental Shelf. Additionally, with the advent of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), development of strategic deep-sea port of Gwadar and the onset of maritime terrorism, PN has been taking its responsibilities safeguarding the maritime frontiers diligently.

It is praiseworthy that besides guarding the maritime frontiers of Pakistan, PN has picked up the cudgel to conduct peacetime missions comprising hydrography and bathometry. To exploit the rich undersea resources, Pakistan recently inducted PNSV BEHR MASAH to undertake hydrographic, oceanographic and geographical surveys as well as seafloor mapping from shallow to ocean depths.

It is expected that PNS Yarmook, and later Tabuk, will act as force multipliers in enhancing PN’s capabilities of safeguarding Pakistan’s maritime frontiers and will offer more flexibility in conducting regional maritime security patrols in the Indian Ocean.
 

Ankit Kumar

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,452
2,233
Bangalore

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Banned
Dec 4, 2017
14,520
10,484
Mumbai
Funds not included in their official defence budget include
1. Pensions/Retired officers welfare funds
2. Nuclear program funding
3. Capital Foreign Purchase funds.

Out of these 3 , the 3rd one is actually not fixed. And thats why they face problems sometimes arranging for funds (which is mostly cut from social welfare funds) .
I hope they acquire many more such platforms. Money, as you know is not an obstacle for the the Pak armed forces. Never has been.
 

Ankit Kumar

Senior member
Nov 30, 2017
2,452
2,233
Bangalore
I hope they acquire many more such platforms. Money, as you know is not an obstacle for the the Pak armed forces. Never has been.
Operational costs will be a problem for them. Especially with Chinese platforms.

You still they bought Z9 helicopters from China. A batch of 6 i think. Instead of going for more Z9 , in last 2 years they actually invested in 3rd hand SeaKings and 2nd hand AloutteIIIs actually. Pretty much sums up the operational capabilities of their chinese platforms.
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
4,720
7,686
Bangalore
LVMH executive among six sentenced in ‘Karachi’ kickbacks affair

The French court on Monday handed down prison sentences to six men linked to ex-prime minister Édouard Balladur after convicting them of funnelling cash from commissions on arms sales to Pakistan and Saudi Arabia to Mr Balladur’s failed 1995 presidential campaign.

Among those found guilty and sentenced to up to five years in prison in the 26-year-old “Karachi affair” was Nicolas Bazire, then Mr Balladur’s campaign manager and now a high-level executive at luxury giant LVMH and close associate of billionaire Bernard Arnault.

The others were the Franco-Lebanese businessman Ziad Takieddine and his former associate Abdul-Rahman Al Assir, for whom arrest warrants have been issued; Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, who worked with then defence minister François Léotard; Thierry Gaubert, budget minister at the time; and Dominique Castellan, then boss of defence group DCN-I.


Lawyers for all six said they would appeal.

Bazire, who runs business development and acquisitions for LVMH, was sentenced to five years in jail — two of them suspended — and also fined €300,000, according to court documents. The court said he “knew perfectly well about the suspicious origins” of the deposit of 10.25m French francs (about €1.5m) from the scheme into the campaign’s bank account.

Hervé Temime, Bazire’s lawyer, said his client has already appealed against what he called a “totally unfounded” decision. “As a result, Bazire remains presumed innocent and I have great hopes that the appeals court will invalidate the decision,” said the lawyer.

LVMH did not immediately respond when asked whether Bazire would remain in his post at the company after the verdict. He also sits on the boards of several big French companies including food retailer Carrefour, waste company Suez, and technology services firm Atos.

Speaking of the behaviour of the former government officials, the judges wrote that their actions were a “grave attack not only on the economic public interest but also on trust in the proper functioning of public life”.

The judgment bodes ill for Mr Balladur and Léotard, who are due to face trial in a special court — the Cour de Justice de la République — because they held ministerial posts at the time of the alleged crimes.

Mr Balladur is only the latest in a long list of French postwar politicians to be accused of corruption or embroiled in financial scandals. Former president Nicolas Sarkozy is facing trial in a separate campaign finance case for allegedly overspending by more than €20m in his 2012 run for the presidency.

The Pakistani affair came to light after a bombing in the port of Karachi in 2002 killed 11 French naval engineers working on a submarine project.

At first the attack was blamed on al-Qaeda, but investigating judges suspected the Pakistani security forces had taken revenge for the termination of secret commissions on the sale of three submarines. Jacques Chirac, who died last year, cancelled the payments when he beat Mr Balladur to the presidency.

The commissions were paid by state-owned French shipbuilder DCN-I — now Naval Group — to intermediaries in 1994.

Olivier Morice, a lawyer who represents the families of the engineers who died in the 2002 bombing, welcomed the verdict: “This is a historic decision in a scandal at the highest levels of the state. Without the original complaint that we filed, there would have been no case.”
 
  • Informative
Reactions: Gautam