Islamic Republic of Pakistan : News, Discussions & Updates

screambowl

Senior member
Dec 19, 2017
2,795
1,226
switzerland
Now we should act and bombard twitter exposing his fake Propaganda but alas we lack in this. We need our own ISPR #Ghafool

In Pakistan the military spends money on people. They recruit them for such jobs and most of them remain permanent if the department closes they get shifted to some fauji foundation undertaking. The bigger reason is their military has only one enemy that is India so they concentrate fully on it, which makes them effective.

Where as in our case we have vast expansion we are capable of everything but we are not able to focus on one thing accurately. And when we even focus we leave it half accomplished.

This is a policy failure of our araam pasand janta jo MNREGA ke dum par pal rahi hai.
 
  • Like
  • Agree
Reactions: Paro and Gautam

Gautam

Moderator
Feb 16, 2019
12,693
9,946
Tripura, NE, India
US Goes For Strict Monitoring of Pakistan’s F-16s

Some in India saw the announcement as subterfuge for upgrading Pakistan’s F-16s, while others saw it as strict US oversight.

By Seema Sirohi
South Asia, World, 4 hours ago
Tr-F16-3c-Reuters-LLLLL-copy.jpg


Washington: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan and his team have declared their US visit a success. They have reason to be pleased, mainly on account of President Donald Trump’s energetic endorsement of Pakistan’s role in the Afghan peace process and his inexplicable claims about India seeking mediation in Kashmir.

Pakistan’s foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, was so convinced of the trip’s success and the improved scenario, he set aside diplomatic caution and accused two US officials – White House senior director for South Asia Lisa Curtis and acting assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia Alice Wells – of shutting the door on Pakistan in the past.

The question is if the door has opened somewhat, if at all. The good optics of Khan sitting beside Trump in the White House worked in Pakistan’s favour, but have things changed substantively for the better for Rawalpindi?

Two public documents by the US government are worth considering. First, the fact sheet released by the White House within minutes of Trump’s claims on Kashmir, which said Washington was asking Pakistan “to do more” to facilitate the Afghanistan peace talks.

Referring to terrorist groups operating within Pakistan, the fact sheet said “it is vital that Pakistan take action to shut down all groups once and for all.”

The fact sheet was obscured in the excitement over Trump’s offer to mediate in Kashmir, but it is a document on the basis of which Curtis and Wells presumably held discussions with the Pakistani delegation. The main thrust was “to do more” on key issues.

r-8-1024x719.jpeg

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan and US President Donald Trump. Photo: Reuters

Monitoring F-16s

More significantly, a day after Khan’s visit ended, the Pentagon announced that it will conduct “24/7 end-use monitoring” of Pakistan’s F-16 fleet by posting 60 representatives on the ground. This was hardly a vote of confidence. It was the first reference to 24/7 monitoring.

Some in India saw the announcement as subterfuge for upgrading Pakistan’s F-16s while others saw it as strict US oversight of Pakistan’s F-16s.

“After Balakot, they want to have proper oversight. It is a stringent imposition of US rules on Pakistan,” a well-informed Indian observer noted. “The notification is very explicit.”

It’s well-known that US officials had ordered a review of the Pakistan’s F-16 fleet after its misuse was reported in the wake of the Pulwama attack in February by Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed.

Indian officials at the time had stressed that Pakistan was in violation of its F-16 end-user agreement, which had been explicitly discussed by US officials in public testimony to the US Congress. New Delhi had also presented evidence of US-made Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles or AMRAAMs used by Pakistan in an air raid on Indian territory.

An additional controversy had arisen over whether an Indian MiG-21 had shot down a Pakistani F-16. A US media report quoting US officials said no F-16 was shot down after a physical count was done. But a Pentagon spokesman told the Hindustan Times he was unaware of any such investigation and the state department declined to discuss details of the end-user monitoring agreement.

While the public controversies raged, the US government was making its own internal assessment of whether Pakistan was in violation. The decision to station more US personnel on the ground hints broadly at what the conclusion might have been.

A sop or not?

The announcement on 24/7 monitoring by the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency came last Friday, soon after Khan’s departure. It was seen as a sop to Pakistan by many, but was it?

The official press release said the state department had approved a possible Foreign Military Sale (FMS) to Pakistan to support a “technical security team” for the F-16 programme for an estimated cost of $125 million.

The notification by DSCA, which leads, directs and manages foreign security assistance for the Pentagon, was sent to the US Congress on July 26. It does not mean resumption of US security aid to Pakistan, a state department official told The Wire. Nearly $2 billion in various military and security aid to Pakistan were blocked last year by the Trump administration.

“There has been no change to the security assistance suspension announced by the president in January 2018 for Pakistan,” the state department official said. But the suspension allowed narrow exceptions in support of US national security interests, he added, implying this was one such allowance.

The team of monitors to be stationed in Pakistan will be supplied by Booz Allen Hamilton Engineering Services, which has been chosen as the principal contractor. Pakistan is said to have 85 functioning F-16s of various models in its inventory.

Much larger sale to India

At the same time, the DSCA also approved a much larger sale to India – $670 million worth of spare and repair parts, technical and logistical support for its C-17 fleet. It was noteworthy that the two announcements came within minutes of each other.

Besides the vast difference in the amount of money involved, perhaps, the idea was to show the difference in the nature of the partnership – Pakistan was getting 24/7 end-use monitoring of its F-16s fleet while India was referred to as an “important force for political stability” in the Indo-Pacific and South Asia region.

But critics saw the Pakistan announcement as the return of good old days for Rawalpindi’s generals and their demands and desires once again coming front and centre.

One Indian analyst said the $125 million for Pakistan was actually meant for retrofitting 18 of the F-16s with updated Pratt & Whitney engines and that Pakistan was well on its way to refurbishing its entire fleet and lengthening its life.

While Pakistan has certainly managed to get its foot in the door in Washington with a well-crafted visit, the DSCA announcement is not about opening the store room. At least, not yet.

download-2-1024x493.jpeg

The idea was to show the difference in the nature of the US’s partnership with India and Pakistan. Photo: REUTERS/ Mian Khursheed /File

Continuation of existing contract

A US official said the Pakistan announcement is a continuation of an existing contract, which was about to expire in December this year. The new approval will finance the programme for the next five years.

First, $125 million is hardly the kind of money that will buy engine upgrades. But it sounds about right for salaries and logistics support for overpaid Booz Allen contractors to provide “oversight of operations” for the next five years.

The oversight will require 60 representatives to be posted in Pakistan for the express purpose of protecting “U.S. technology through the continued presence of U.S. personnel that provide 24/7 end-use monitoring.” The idea is also be to protect US technology from Chinese spies in Pakistan.

A US security contractor can make anywhere between $100,000 to $250,000 a year depending on the country he is deployed in and the company he/she works for. Besides the salary, defence contractors claim expenses for offices, residence, frequent travel, logistics and support staff. An extremely high profit margin is built in because of the “danger” involved.

A good comparison is the cost of deployment of US troops. Studies have shown that it cost the US government about $1 million per soldier per year in Afghanistan in 2009. By 2014, the figure had doubled.

At the same time, US policy and attendant moves vis-à-vis Pakistan do require close monitoring and a healthy dose of scepticism. There’s no telling what turns Washington may make given Trump’s desperation to get out of Afghanistan.

Seema Sirohi is a Washington DC-based commentator.

US Goes For Strict Monitoring of Pakistan’s F-16s
 

Deathstar

Well-Known member
Jun 1, 2019
1,622
951
India
US Goes For Strict Monitoring of Pakistan’s F-16s

Some in India saw the announcement as subterfuge for upgrading Pakistan’s F-16s, while others saw it as strict US oversight.

By Seema Sirohi
South Asia, World, 4 hours ago
Tr-F16-3c-Reuters-LLLLL-copy.jpg


Washington: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan and his team have declared their US visit a success. They have reason to be pleased, mainly on account of President Donald Trump’s energetic endorsement of Pakistan’s role in the Afghan peace process and his inexplicable claims about India seeking mediation in Kashmir.

Pakistan’s foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, was so convinced of the trip’s success and the improved scenario, he set aside diplomatic caution and accused two US officials – White House senior director for South Asia Lisa Curtis and acting assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia Alice Wells – of shutting the door on Pakistan in the past.

The question is if the door has opened somewhat, if at all. The good optics of Khan sitting beside Trump in the White House worked in Pakistan’s favour, but have things changed substantively for the better for Rawalpindi?

Two public documents by the US government are worth considering. First, the fact sheet released by the White House within minutes of Trump’s claims on Kashmir, which said Washington was asking Pakistan “to do more” to facilitate the Afghanistan peace talks.

Referring to terrorist groups operating within Pakistan, the fact sheet said “it is vital that Pakistan take action to shut down all groups once and for all.”

The fact sheet was obscured in the excitement over Trump’s offer to mediate in Kashmir, but it is a document on the basis of which Curtis and Wells presumably held discussions with the Pakistani delegation. The main thrust was “to do more” on key issues.

r-8-1024x719.jpeg

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan and US President Donald Trump. Photo: Reuters

Monitoring F-16s

More significantly, a day after Khan’s visit ended, the Pentagon announced that it will conduct “24/7 end-use monitoring” of Pakistan’s F-16 fleet by posting 60 representatives on the ground. This was hardly a vote of confidence. It was the first reference to 24/7 monitoring.

Some in India saw the announcement as subterfuge for upgrading Pakistan’s F-16s while others saw it as strict US oversight of Pakistan’s F-16s.

“After Balakot, they want to have proper oversight. It is a stringent imposition of US rules on Pakistan,” a well-informed Indian observer noted. “The notification is very explicit.”

It’s well-known that US officials had ordered a review of the Pakistan’s F-16 fleet after its misuse was reported in the wake of the Pulwama attack in February by Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed.

Indian officials at the time had stressed that Pakistan was in violation of its F-16 end-user agreement, which had been explicitly discussed by US officials in public testimony to the US Congress. New Delhi had also presented evidence of US-made Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles or AMRAAMs used by Pakistan in an air raid on Indian territory.

An additional controversy had arisen over whether an Indian MiG-21 had shot down a Pakistani F-16. A US media report quoting US officials said no F-16 was shot down after a physical count was done. But a Pentagon spokesman told the Hindustan Times he was unaware of any such investigation and the state department declined to discuss details of the end-user monitoring agreement.

While the public controversies raged, the US government was making its own internal assessment of whether Pakistan was in violation. The decision to station more US personnel on the ground hints broadly at what the conclusion might have been.

A sop or not?

The announcement on 24/7 monitoring by the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency came last Friday, soon after Khan’s departure. It was seen as a sop to Pakistan by many, but was it?

The official press release said the state department had approved a possible Foreign Military Sale (FMS) to Pakistan to support a “technical security team” for the F-16 programme for an estimated cost of $125 million.

The notification by DSCA, which leads, directs and manages foreign security assistance for the Pentagon, was sent to the US Congress on July 26. It does not mean resumption of US security aid to Pakistan, a state department official told The Wire. Nearly $2 billion in various military and security aid to Pakistan were blocked last year by the Trump administration.

“There has been no change to the security assistance suspension announced by the president in January 2018 for Pakistan,” the state department official said. But the suspension allowed narrow exceptions in support of US national security interests, he added, implying this was one such allowance.

The team of monitors to be stationed in Pakistan will be supplied by Booz Allen Hamilton Engineering Services, which has been chosen as the principal contractor. Pakistan is said to have 85 functioning F-16s of various models in its inventory.

Much larger sale to India

At the same time, the DSCA also approved a much larger sale to India – $670 million worth of spare and repair parts, technical and logistical support for its C-17 fleet. It was noteworthy that the two announcements came within minutes of each other.

Besides the vast difference in the amount of money involved, perhaps, the idea was to show the difference in the nature of the partnership – Pakistan was getting 24/7 end-use monitoring of its F-16s fleet while India was referred to as an “important force for political stability” in the Indo-Pacific and South Asia region.

But critics saw the Pakistan announcement as the return of good old days for Rawalpindi’s generals and their demands and desires once again coming front and centre.

One Indian analyst said the $125 million for Pakistan was actually meant for retrofitting 18 of the F-16s with updated Pratt & Whitney engines and that Pakistan was well on its way to refurbishing its entire fleet and lengthening its life.

While Pakistan has certainly managed to get its foot in the door in Washington with a well-crafted visit, the DSCA announcement is not about opening the store room. At least, not yet.

download-2-1024x493.jpeg

The idea was to show the difference in the nature of the US’s partnership with India and Pakistan. Photo: REUTERS/ Mian Khursheed /File

Continuation of existing contract

A US official said the Pakistan announcement is a continuation of an existing contract, which was about to expire in December this year. The new approval will finance the programme for the next five years.

First, $125 million is hardly the kind of money that will buy engine upgrades. But it sounds about right for salaries and logistics support for overpaid Booz Allen contractors to provide “oversight of operations” for the next five years.

The oversight will require 60 representatives to be posted in Pakistan for the express purpose of protecting “U.S. technology through the continued presence of U.S. personnel that provide 24/7 end-use monitoring.” The idea is also be to protect US technology from Chinese spies in Pakistan.

A US security contractor can make anywhere between $100,000 to $250,000 a year depending on the country he is deployed in and the company he/she works for. Besides the salary, defence contractors claim expenses for offices, residence, frequent travel, logistics and support staff. An extremely high profit margin is built in because of the “danger” involved.

A good comparison is the cost of deployment of US troops. Studies have shown that it cost the US government about $1 million per soldier per year in Afghanistan in 2009. By 2014, the figure had doubled.

At the same time, US policy and attendant moves vis-à-vis Pakistan do require close monitoring and a healthy dose of scepticism. There’s no telling what turns Washington may make given Trump’s desperation to get out of Afghanistan.

Seema Sirohi is a Washington DC-based commentator.

US Goes For Strict Monitoring of Pakistan’s F-16s
I thought they were gonna get 2 sq of block 70 plus all F16 fleet upgraded to viper standard in 125 million dollars
 

Paro

Bloom17
Dec 2, 2017
1,182
1,019
United States
Booz Allen Hamilton offers 250K+ a foreign contract just for a Sr engg. No wonder they are charging them 125million, considering its Pakistan and the contractor has security clearance.
I made 35$/hr just as an intern in leadership development program 6yrs ago.
 

Gautam

Moderator
Feb 16, 2019
12,693
9,946
Tripura, NE, India
5 dead, 38 injured in Pakistan bombing

Police suspect blast was targeted at SHO, who was critically injured

Published: July 31, 2019 13:02, Agencies
Islamabad: Five people were killed and 38 others injured in a bombing outside a police station in Pakistan’s Quetta city, authorities have said.

The blast took place close to a police vehicle at the Bacha Khan Chowk in the remit of the City Police Station on Tuesday, Quetta’s Deputy Inspector-General (DIG) of police Abdul Razzaq Cheema said.

The target of the blast appeared to be the Station House Officer (SHO) of the area who received some injuries and has been shifted to a hospital, the DIG told reporters.

“The bomb went off as soon as SHO Shaffat got down from his vehicle,” he said, adding that the condition of the SHO is said to be critical.

Cheema said it was too early to confirm whether it was a suicide attack or the blast caused by a remotely triggered device.

Police said the bomb was planted in a motorcycle parked close to the patrolling vehicle. Five people, including two cops, were killed and 38 others injured in the attack.

Three people died on the spot, police said.

The injured included women and children who were passing through the area when the bomb went off in the heart of the city. The condition of at least six of them was stated to be serious.

Eight of the wounded are listed in serious condition at hospitals in Quetta, capital of Balochistan province.

No group has claimed responsibility for the bombing, which took place late in the afternoon.

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan issued a statement condemning the attack and expressing sorrow over “the loss of lives.”

Quetta, home to more than 1 million people, is one of the most dangerous cities in Pakistan due to the presence of armed groups, including Baloch separatists, the Pakistani Taliban and other terrorist factions.

Two people died and 16 were hurt last week in a motorcycle-bomb attack on the outskirts of the city. And a year ago, Quetta suffered the worst terrorist incident in Pakistan’s history: an attack on a political rally that left 149 people dead.

Earlier, police officials said terrorists had planted explosives in a motorcycle and parked it near the police vehicle before it was detonated.

A contingent of the law enforcement agencies threw a security cordon around the area as rescuers continued evacuations.

The banned Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan claimed responsibility for the blast, according to a report in a leading Pakistani daily.

The injured and bodies of the dead were shifted to the Civil Hospital, where officials confirmed the death toll.

The impact of the blast was so strong that it shattered the glass windows of nearby shopping malls and damaged parked vehicles and motorcycles.

Home Minister Mir Zia Langove said the government would not be cowed down by such attacks and the mission to purge the province of the menace of terrorism would continue.

Balochistan Governor retired Justice Amanullah Khan Yasinzai, Chief Minister Jam Kamal Khan and his cabinet members strongly condemned the bomb blast and expressed their grief and sorrow over the loss of lives of innocent people.

It was the second bomb explosion within the last seven days in the provincial capital. On July 23, a blast had occurred in the Eastern Bypass area which left four people dead and 32 injured.

Balochistan has been wrecked by ethnic, sectarian and separatist violence for more than a decade.


5 dead, 38 injured in Pakistan bombing
 

Fafnir

Well-Known member
Jun 19, 2019
141
316
Norge
I thought they were gonna get 2 sq of block 70 plus all F16 fleet upgraded to viper standard in 125 million dollars

Lol. Who's the idiot that claimed this. 125 Million USD will buy you exactly 1 F-16 Block 70:ROFLMAO:.

Booz Allen Hamilton offers 250K+ a foreign contract just for a Sr engg. No wonder they are charging them 125million, considering its Pakistan and the contractor has security clearance.

I worked with private security contractors in Afghanistan and have seen them in Mali too. Overpaid and underworked. They pretend to be bad***es, but when bullets start flying they run and hide behind real soldiers.

125 million for a security contract almost seems too little based on how overvalued PMCs and consultants are.
 

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
17,337
13,260
Mumbai
Lol. Who's the idiot that claimed this. 125 Million USD will buy you exactly 1 F-16 Block 70:ROFLMAO:..
So, they aren't getting it. Thanks for the confirmation. @Arsalan123


I worked with private security contractors in Afghanistan and have seen them in Mali too. Overpaid and underworked. They pretend to be bad***es, but when bullets start flying they run and hide behind real soldiers.
In other words, the money for their services gets transferred within. So much for no corruption within the US. Whereas NATO actually supplies the fighting men / women, ya?
125 million for a security contract almost seems too little based on how overvalued PMCs and consultants are.

As above. Pls google Arthshaastra PDF. You're a brave soldier like the Vikings of before. Perhaps a bit of strategy is in order, ya?
 

Paro

Bloom17
Dec 2, 2017
1,182
1,019
United States
I worked with private security contractors in Afghanistan and have seen them in Mali too. Overpaid and underworked. They pretend to be bad***es, but when bullets start flying they run and hide behind real soldiers.

125 million for a security contract almost seems too little based on how overvalued PMCs and consultants are.
I doubt its 60 contractors. 125 is actually way little especially BAH. BAH pays hell lot for defense contractors, especially in the middle east. I knew a person making 750$ with confidential SCL, he was a senior then, probably in his late 40's (Posted in Nigeria). I would have blindly moved into overseas contracting if my SCL went through :confused:.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BlackOpsIndia

Butter Chicken

Senior member
Dec 2, 2017
1,265
1,235
  • Like
Reactions: BlackOpsIndia

Gautam

Moderator
Feb 16, 2019
12,693
9,946
Tripura, NE, India
Four soldiers martyred in North Waziristan attacks

The Newspaper's Correspondent, August 03, 2019


MIRAMSHAH: Four soldiers were martyred and a fifth one was injured in two gun attacks on security forces in North Waziristan tribal district on Friday evening.

Officials confirming the attacks said that suspected terrorists opened fire on a patrolling party in Razmak in which three soldiers were martyred.

The other attack was carried out in the Datakhel area in which one soldier was martyred and another one received injuries.

No further details were immediately available.

Published in Dawn, August 3rd, 2019

Four soldiers martyred in North Waziristan attacks - Newspaper - DAWN.COM
 
  • Like
Reactions: BlackOpsIndia