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Gautam

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Stage set for first-ever two-plus-two ministerial dialogue between Indian and Japan; here’s the agenda

By: Huma Siddiqui | Published: November 27, 2019 5:50:04 PM

Both countries already had 2+2 dialogue at the level of foreign and defence secretaries which had started in 2010 which discussed issues related to maritime security, cyber and Outer Space.

Japan becomes the second country with whom India has 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue. (File photo: PTI)

Maritime Domain Awareness, military trade, and further cooperation towards peace and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region are some of the critical issues on the agenda of the first-ever India-Japan 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue later this week. The two sides are expected to discuss the stability of the India and the Pacific Ocean as well as the developments in the South China Sea and the Korean Peninsula.

Both countries already had 2+2 dialogue at the level of foreign and defence secretaries which had started in 2010 which discussed issues related to maritime security, cyber and Outer Space.

Japan becomes the second country with whom India has 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue. Both defence Minister Rajnath Singh and external affairs minister S Jaishankar will meet their Japanese counterparts in New Delhi. The first round of India-US 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue had taken place in New Delhi in September 2018 and both countries are getting ready for the second edition scheduled for next month to be held in Washington DC.

The 2+2 India-Japan Ministerial Dialogue is coinciding with the annual summit between the two countries to be held mid-December, the dates have not officially been announced. Sources who wished to remain anonymous said that “The annual summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan is expected to be held around December 18, in Guwhati, Assam.”

In a joint statement released at the end of summit-level talks in Tokyo in October 2018, both sides had expressed their desire to take defence and security cooperation to the next level. There are different mechanisms including the Annual Defence Ministerial Dialogue, Defence Policy Dialogue, and the National Security Advisers’ Dialogue in place. The idea for the 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue between the two countries was mooted during the talks in the last annual summit.

The defence forces along with the Coast Guards of both sides have been having joint drills on a regular basis. However, the defence trade between the two countries has not taken off as the amphibious aircraft US-2 has been put on a back burner.

While the leaders of India and Japan have reiterated their commitment to working together towards a free and open Indo-Pacific, the defence ministers are keen to increase their participation in multilateral exercises. So far, the two countries have participated in the Japan-India-US trilateral maritime exercise ‘Malabar 2019’, the second Japan-India-US trilateral mine-countermeasures exercise (MINEX) that was held in July.

India and Japan Armies have had their first-ever bilateral exercises — ‘Dharma Guardian’ and ‘Shinyuu Maitri’, in 2018 and last year, Japan was an observer for the first time at the India-US Air Force exercise ‘Cope India’.

Stage set for first-ever two-plus-two ministerial dialogue between Indian and Japan; here’s the agenda
 

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Stage set for first-ever two-plus-two ministerial dialogue between Indian and Japan; here’s the agenda

By: Huma Siddiqui | Published: November 27, 2019 5:50:04 PM

Both countries already had 2+2 dialogue at the level of foreign and defence secretaries which had started in 2010 which discussed issues related to maritime security, cyber and Outer Space.

Japan becomes the second country with whom India has 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue. (File photo: PTI)

Maritime Domain Awareness, military trade, and further cooperation towards peace and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region are some of the critical issues on the agenda of the first-ever India-Japan 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue later this week. The two sides are expected to discuss the stability of the India and the Pacific Ocean as well as the developments in the South China Sea and the Korean Peninsula.

Both countries already had 2+2 dialogue at the level of foreign and defence secretaries which had started in 2010 which discussed issues related to maritime security, cyber and Outer Space.

Japan becomes the second country with whom India has 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue. Both defence Minister Rajnath Singh and external affairs minister S Jaishankar will meet their Japanese counterparts in New Delhi. The first round of India-US 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue had taken place in New Delhi in September 2018 and both countries are getting ready for the second edition scheduled for next month to be held in Washington DC.

The 2+2 India-Japan Ministerial Dialogue is coinciding with the annual summit between the two countries to be held mid-December, the dates have not officially been announced. Sources who wished to remain anonymous said that “The annual summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan is expected to be held around December 18, in Guwhati, Assam.”

In a joint statement released at the end of summit-level talks in Tokyo in October 2018, both sides had expressed their desire to take defence and security cooperation to the next level. There are different mechanisms including the Annual Defence Ministerial Dialogue, Defence Policy Dialogue, and the National Security Advisers’ Dialogue in place. The idea for the 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue between the two countries was mooted during the talks in the last annual summit.

The defence forces along with the Coast Guards of both sides have been having joint drills on a regular basis. However, the defence trade between the two countries has not taken off as the amphibious aircraft US-2 has been put on a back burner.

While the leaders of India and Japan have reiterated their commitment to working together towards a free and open Indo-Pacific, the defence ministers are keen to increase their participation in multilateral exercises. So far, the two countries have participated in the Japan-India-US trilateral maritime exercise ‘Malabar 2019’, the second Japan-India-US trilateral mine-countermeasures exercise (MINEX) that was held in July.

India and Japan Armies have had their first-ever bilateral exercises — ‘Dharma Guardian’ and ‘Shinyuu Maitri’, in 2018 and last year, Japan was an observer for the first time at the India-US Air Force exercise ‘Cope India’.

Stage set for first-ever two-plus-two ministerial dialogue between Indian and Japan; here’s the agenda
The problem with Indo Japanese strategic ties is traditionally the Japanese take forever to reach a decision & build upon it whereas the traditional Indian bureaucracy is as it is inert & lethargic. Add to it the US strategic overhang on all Japanese relations with third parties.

Which in turn translates to meetings & more meetings and little to show for it in substantial terms except photo ops, grandiloquent declarations & some exercises either on a bilateral or multi lateral basis.

Japan is still nowhere in the reckoning as far as strategic tie ups for state of the art defence equipments go. As far as I know neither are they interested in participation of our latest sub tender nor is the IN keen on their subs. We've been hearing of the amphibious Aircraft since ages without any forward movement though the latter may well be held up now due to lack of money at our end. Then there's the 5th gen FA program of the Japanese. These are but a few instances that comes to ones mind. OTOH with the conclusion of all the foundational framework agreements on co operation with the US viz BECA , etc one hopes to see conclusions of similar agreements with the Japanese and forward movement on the SOSUS network in the Indo Pacific Ocean region.
 

Gautam

Team StratFront
Feb 16, 2019
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Tripura, NE, India
The problem with Indo Japanese strategic ties is traditionally the Japanese take forever to reach a decision & build upon it whereas the traditional Indian bureaucracy is as it is inert & lethargic. Add to it the US strategic overhang on all Japanese relations with third parties.

Which in turn translates to meetings & more meetings and little to show for it in substantial terms except photo ops, grandiloquent declarations & some exercises either on a bilateral or multi lateral basis.
None of the "Quad" are perfect. But they can be greatly complimentary to each other's capabilities. You are right, our own internal squabbles makes us quite inefficient. However there is still a strong possibility this relationship may go to great places. At least I would like to believe so.
Japan is still nowhere in the reckoning as far as strategic tie ups for state of the art defence equipments go. As far as I know neither are they interested in participation of our latest sub tender nor is the IN keen on their subs. We've been hearing of the amphibious Aircraft since ages without any forward movement though the latter may well be held up now due to lack of money at our end.
They are pacifists and we are poor. Not the most ideal of pairs, but we can always find something else to kick start defence relation.
Then there's the 5th gen FA program of the Japanese.
Who knows this might be the one that starts a defence relation. I doubt either country will propose it. But this could be something.
OTOH with the conclusion of all the foundational framework agreements on co operation with the US viz BECA , etc one hopes to see conclusions of similar agreements with the Japanese and forward movement on the SOSUS network in the Indo Pacific Ocean region.
And more space exploration. There is always room there.
 

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
13,764
9,838
Mumbai
None of the "Quad" are perfect. But they can be greatly complimentary to each other's capabilities. You are right, our own internal squabbles makes us quite inefficient. However there is still a strong possibility this relationship may go to great places. At least I would like to believe so.

They are pacifists and we are poor. Not the most ideal of pairs, but we can always find something else to kick start defence relation.

Who knows this might be the one that starts a defence relation. I doubt either country will propose it. But this could be something.

And more space exploration. There is always room there.
I was referring to purely the defense component of this relationships. We've fairly decent commercial/ infrastructure related development with them in India & 3rd countries. Though this can always be more. However, restrictions on labour, land, infrastructure, taxation & issues like corporate governance viz Ranbaxy, Docomo with Tatas under Cyrus Mistry etc has caused the Japanese to reconsider major investment decisions.

The Quad will always be WiP unless China or it's proxies undertake some major project which has global ramifications. OTOH, India can operationalize components of defense strategy apart from jointness w.r.t state of the art equipment with Japan unlike Australia which may not have much to offer or the US which is an unreliable partner.

Their pacifism is gradually being reduced. If Abe is around for another 4-5 , with help from DPRK, you can be sure Japan's Constitution will see major revisions. If DPRK continues to test N weapons & it's NWP, Japanese restraint in exercising the N option will change as well which in turn is contingent on the deletion/ modification of those articles of the Japanese Constitution which promote active pacifism.
 
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Gautam

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Joint Statement - First India-Japan 2+2 Foreign and Defence Ministerial Meeting

November 30, 2019


1. Defence Minister of India, Mr. Rajnath Singh and External Affairs Minister of India, Dr. S. Jaishankar, met Foreign Affairs Minister of Japan, Mr. MOTEGI Toshimitsu, and Minister of Defense of Japan, Mr. KONO Taro, on 30 November 2019 in New Delhi for the first India-Japan 2+2 Foreign and Defence Ministerial Meeting.

2. The Ministers affirmed that this dialogue will further enhance the strategic depth of bilateral security and defence cooperation. Acknowledging emerging security challenges, the Ministers reiterated their commitment to advancing bilateral security cooperation based on the 2008 Joint Declaration on Security Cooperation and the 2009 Action Plan to advance Security Cooperation. Recalling that the two sides had a shared vision of a free, open, inclusive and rules-based Indo-Pacific region in which the principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity are ensured, and all countries enjoy freedom of navigation and overflight, the Ministers emphasized that further strengthening of bilateral cooperation was in mutual interest of both countries and would also help in furthering the cause of the peace, security and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region.

Bilateral Cooperation

3. The Ministers welcomed the progress made in deepening bilateral defence cooperation last year. The Ministers noted with satisfaction that since last year India and Japan have initiated bilateral exercises between all three components of their defence forces. The Ministers shared the view to make continuous efforts for holding the bilateral exercises between the defence forces regularly and further expanding the same. In this regard, the Ministers welcomed the recently conducted second "Dharma Guardian-2019” and the second "SHINYUU Maitri-2019”. The Ministers also concurred to proceed with coordination for the first India-Japan joint fighter aircraft exercise in Japan.

4. The Ministers welcomed the significant progress made in the negotiations of Acquisition and Cross-Servicing Agreement (ACSA) since the announcement to commence the negotiations in October 2018. The Ministers expressed their desire for early conclusion of the negotiations and were of the view that the agreement will further contribute to enhancing defence cooperation between the two sides.


5. Acknowledging the importance of ensuring maritime safety in achieving a free, open, inclusive and rules-based Indo-Pacific, the Ministers expressed their intention to further promote cooperation in the field of capacity building in maritime security and Maritime Domain Awareness including through cooperation with other countries. In this context, the Ministers welcomed the setting up of Information Fusion Centre - Indian Ocean Region (IFC-IOR) by India in December 2018. The Indian side looked forward to Japanese side dispatching a liaison officer at the IFC-IOR in the near future. The Ministers noted with satisfaction the commencement of exchange of information based on the Implementing Arrangement for Deeper Cooperation between the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and the Indian Navy signed last year.

6. The Ministers emphasized the need to further strengthen the defence equipment and technology cooperation and looked forward to productive discussions in the fifth Joint Working Group on Defence Equipment and Technology Cooperation (JWG-DETC). In this context, the Ministers welcomed the progress on cooperative research in the area of Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV)/ Robotics.

7. The Ministers appreciated the existing exchange programs between the defence educational and research institutions of the two countries and expressed their desire to continue and expand the exchange programmes.

Multilateral Cooperation

8. Recalling the Japan-India-US Summit Meetings in November 2018 and June 2019, the Ministers acknowledged the trilateral cooperation with the US. The Ministers expressed their satisfaction at trilateral cooperation represented by the "MALABAR 2019” held from September-October 2019 off the coast of Japan, mine-countermeasures exercise (MINEX) held in Japan in July 2019 and "Cope India 2018” in which Japan participated as an observer in December 2018.

9. The Ministers welcomed the recent Japan-India-Australia-US Foreign Ministerial consultations in New York in September 2019.

Regional and International Affairs

10. The Ministers had a frank and fruitful exchange of views on the regional issues of mutual interests particularly on the security situation in the Indo-Pacific.

11. The Ministers reaffirmed the importance of supporting ASEAN centrality and unity for promoting peace and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific. The Ministers welcomed the adoption of "ASEAN Outlook on the Indo-Pacific (AOIP)” during the 34th ASEAN Summit in Thailand in June 2019. The Ministers expressed their commitment to working together with ASEAN for achieving their shared objectives. The Ministers also reiterated their support for ASEAN-led frameworks such as the East Asia Summit (EAS), the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) and ASEAN Defence Ministers’ Meeting-Plus (ADMM-Plus).

12. The Japanese side appreciated India’s announcement of "Indo-Pacific Oceans Initiative” at the recent 14th EAS to create a safe, secure, stable, prosperous and sustainable maritime domain and confirmed their willingness to discuss concrete cooperation based on the Initiative. The Ministers noted with satisfaction that India and Japan’s initiatives for realizing a free and open Indo-Pacific, including also the recent "Indo-Pacific Oceans Initiative” and AOIP all strive for an Indo-Pacific region that is inclusive and open to all countries in the region. The Indian side welcomed Japan’s "Vientiane Vision 2.0” in November 2019 as an updated initiative for defence cooperation between Japan and ASEAN.

13. The Ministers reaffirmed the importance of realizing North Korea’s complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of all weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles of all ranges in accordance with the relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions (UNSCRs) and expressed their commitment to the full implementation of the relevant UNSCRs. The Ministers condemned North Korea’s recent launches of ballistic missiles which are clear violation of the relevant UNSCRs. The Ministers strongly urged North Korea to resolve the abductions issue at the earliest date.

14. The Ministers exchanged views on the recent developments in the South China Sea keeping in view also the Chairman's Statement of the 14th EAS. In this context, the Ministers reaffirmed the importance of freedom of navigation and overflight, unimpeded lawful commerce and peaceful resolution of disputes with full respect for legal and diplomatic processes in accordance with the universally recognized principles of international law, including those reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). The Ministers also took note of the negotiations of a Code of Conduct (COC) and urged that it should be effective, substantive, and consistent with international law, including the UNCLOS, ensure freedom of navigation and must not prejudice the rights and interests of the stakeholders using the South China Sea and freedoms of all states under international law.

15. The Ministers condemned in the strongest terms the growing threat of terrorism and acknowledged that it constituted a major threat to peace and security in the region. The Ministers called upon all countries take resolute action in rooting out terrorist safe havens and infrastructure, disrupting terrorist networks and eliminating financing channels and halting cross-border movement of terrorists. The Ministers underlined the need for all countries to ensure that all territory under their control is not used to launch terrorist attacks on other countries in any manner. They noted in this context the threat posed to regional security by terrorist networks operating out of Pakistan and called upon it to take resolute and irreversible action against them and fully comply with international commitments including to FATF. The Ministers emphasised the need for stronger international partnership in countering terrorism and violent extremism, including through increased sharing of information and intelligence.

16. The Ministers shared recognition on the importance of continuing exchange of opinions in light of the success of this 2+2 Ministerial Meeting, and decided to hold the next 2+2 Ministerial Meeting in Tokyo.

New Delhi
November 30, 2019

Joint Statement - First India-Japan 2+2 Foreign and Defence Ministerial Meeting