Indian Space Program: News & Discussions

Gautam

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Announcement of Opportunity (AO) for Utilizing AstroSat archival data

Dec 06, 2019



AstroSat is India's first multi-wavelength observatory class mission. It completed four years of operations on 26th of September 2018. Data from AstroSat was opened to public on 28th September 2018
(Archival Data of AstroSat released - ISRO) and archived at ISSDC (https://astrobrowse.issdc.gov.in/astro.html).

Proposals are hereby invited from Astronomy community of the nation for utilizing AstroSat archival data. This announcement of opportunity (AO) is open to Indian scientific community for submitting research proposals towards utilisation of data from any and/or all the experiments for limited financial assistance. For a detailed information on the AO please refer to AstroSat_AO

The completely filled-in application has to reach sspo@isro.gov.in on or before 14-01-2020.
 

vingensys

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It was commissioned much later. At that time we did not have the experience to build even the test stand for the Vikas, let alone the entire facility as you know it today.

Look at the test stand in the picture and compare it with the test stand for the Vikas high thrust engine that was seen recently. You will notice a gulf of difference. That's because most of the equipment here were direct imports from France. We just needed to set up the equipment somewhere nice and quiet, that place was Mahendragiri. Of course as ISRO's expertise grows they would turn the facility to a much larger and capable one before officially commissioning it.
@Gautam Kindly read this news paper articleTOI Article on Vikas test in Vernon

 

Gautam

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What a fantastic article, thank you for this. You were right, this photo was from France. My apologies, I got it wrong. I think I have mistaken the photo of Vikas test in India with the test in France. There is another picture though, the one after the test in India. I still can't seem to find it. Why don't you try, you might find it.
 
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Gautam

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Everyone please take a look at this video of the PSLV C-48 launch. This is by far the most beautiful vid of PSLV launch I've ever seen and it was shot by an random guy on the road with a camera. Makes you wonder why do we even let DD National cover these launches. All the taxpayer's money couldn't buy them a proper camera ?

 

Deathstar

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Everyone please take a look at this video of the PSLV C-48 launch. This is by far the most beautiful vid of PSLV launch I've ever seen and it was shot by an random guy on the road with a camera. Makes you wonder why do we even let DD National cover these launches. All the taxpayer's money couldn't buy them a proper camera ?

We all know where the tax payers money goes
....
...
 

Gautam

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We all know where the tax payers money goes
....
...
Well ain't that the truth. :cautious:
At least ISRO is shaking things up at bit recently. I am not sure of this but there has been some talks of putting out open commercial tenders for launch coverage earning the winner exclusive coverage rights. Sort of like exclusive coverage for cricket matches. The CY-2 launch coverage was a trial run for it. Now that would be interesting and if nothing else it will hold the DD National's a** to the fire.
 

Deathstar

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Well ain't that the truth. :cautious:
At least ISRO is shaking things up at bit recently. I am not sure of this but there has been some talks of putting out open commercial tenders for launch coverage earning the winner exclusive coverage rights. Sort of like exclusive coverage for cricket matches. The CY-2 launch coverage was a trial run for it. Now that would be interesting and if nothing else it will hold the DD National's a** to the fire.
It should and part of that money should go to ISROs budget.
I bet DD babus have 8k camera bills ready to show the money spent
 

RISING SUN

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Isro revenue from commercial satellite launches up by 40%: Minister
The revenue earned by the commercial arm of India's space agency rose by around 40 per cent in 2018-19 to Rs 324.19 crore from Rs 232.56 crore last year, helped by satellite launches for foreign customers.

In five years revenue generated by launching satellites for other countries stood at Rs 1,245.17 crore. The Indian Space Research Organisation has launched satellites from 26 countries during the last five years, Jitendra Singh, minister in charge of atomic energy and space, told Rajya Sabha.

He added, contracts with 10 countries namely; USA, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Singapore, The Netherlands, Japan, Malaysia, Algeria and France were signed in the last five years under commercial arrangements.
Isro revenue from commercial satellite launches up by 40%: Minister
 
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Gautam

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Next for Isro: A mobile launchpad

Chethan Kumar | TNN | Dec 15, 2019, 20:22 IST

Isro has a string of big tickets projects it hopes to execute in the next decade.

BENGALURU: The next decade will be a compilation of milestones if everything goes as per plan for Isro, which, among many big ticket programmes in its pipeline, will also build a mobile launchpad for the proposed small satellite launch vehicle (SSLV) class of vehicles.

Just last week, China demonstrated its ability to do this by using mobile launchers developed for its military to put into space seven civilian satellites. But Isro chairman K Sivan told TOI that that the agency won’t be using military technology for its proposed mobile launchpads.

From a mission to Sun (Aditya) to Chandrayaan-3, and from Gaganyaan (human spaceflight mission) to NISAR, a joint project with US’ Nasa, Isro has a string of big tickets projects it hopes to execute in the next decade.

The Chinese satellites were, on Saturday, launched using KZ-1As rockets, a lightweight solid fuel projectile developed by the China Aerospace Science & Industry Corporation (CASIC), using technology initially for use by the military, state broadcaster CCTV reported.

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which on March 27, 2019, showed off India’s capabilities of hitting a satellite in space using a missile will also have the ability to turn around the technology and spin it off as a mobile launcher.

Sivan, however, said: “We won’t be working with DRDO. As of now the focus is on developing the second spaceport in Tamil Nadu, but we are also working on building mobile launchpads.” Isro has already requested for Rs 120 crore for a new launchpad for SSLV, which will be part of the new spaceport being proposed in Kulasekarapattinam, a town in the Tamil Nadu’s Tuticorin.

Isro will need more than 2,000 acres of land in Kulasekarapattinam, the process to acquire which has already begun.

Isro, at present, carries out all its launches from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), in Andhra Pradesh’s Sriharikota, about 100km from Chennai. Set up in 1971, SDSC will continue to serve the space agency with PSLV and GSLV launches even in the future. “For the Gaganyaan mission, we will require some changes to be made and those modifications will be carried out at Sriharikota,” Sivan had told TOI.

Isro, which has planned at least two experimental flights of SSLV in the coming year, will also look at involving private players for development of future rockets. The space agency has been opening up opportunities for the private sector with the first official expression of interest (EOI) inviting private consortiums to build as many as five PSLVs issued in August this year.

While Isro had earlier allowed private players to assemble satellites, an EOI for launch vehicles was a major shift in the way Isro has been working over the decades. According to a senior official from the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), the cost of one fully integrated PSLV launch vehicle is Rs 200 crore. This means that the value of the deal Isro is offering private industry—to build five PSLVs—is at least Rs 1,000 crore.

Next for Isro: A mobile launchpad | India News - Times of India
 

vingensys

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May 9, 2019
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Next for Isro: A mobile launchpad

Chethan Kumar | TNN | Dec 15, 2019, 20:22 IST

Isro has a string of big tickets projects it hopes to execute in the next decade.

BENGALURU: The next decade will be a compilation of milestones if everything goes as per plan for Isro, which, among many big ticket programmes in its pipeline, will also build a mobile launchpad for the proposed small satellite launch vehicle (SSLV) class of vehicles.

Just last week, China demonstrated its ability to do this by using mobile launchers developed for its military to put into space seven civilian satellites. But Isro chairman K Sivan told TOI that that the agency won’t be using military technology for its proposed mobile launchpads.

From a mission to Sun (Aditya) to Chandrayaan-3, and from Gaganyaan (human spaceflight mission) to NISAR, a joint project with US’ Nasa, Isro has a string of big tickets projects it hopes to execute in the next decade.

The Chinese satellites were, on Saturday, launched using KZ-1As rockets, a lightweight solid fuel projectile developed by the China Aerospace Science & Industry Corporation (CASIC), using technology initially for use by the military, state broadcaster CCTV reported.

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which on March 27, 2019, showed off India’s capabilities of hitting a satellite in space using a missile will also have the ability to turn around the technology and spin it off as a mobile launcher.

Sivan, however, said: “We won’t be working with DRDO. As of now the focus is on developing the second spaceport in Tamil Nadu, but we are also working on building mobile launchpads.” Isro has already requested for Rs 120 crore for a new launchpad for SSLV, which will be part of the new spaceport being proposed in Kulasekarapattinam, a town in the Tamil Nadu’s Tuticorin.

Isro will need more than 2,000 acres of land in Kulasekarapattinam, the process to acquire which has already begun.

Isro, at present, carries out all its launches from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), in Andhra Pradesh’s Sriharikota, about 100km from Chennai. Set up in 1971, SDSC will continue to serve the space agency with PSLV and GSLV launches even in the future. “For the Gaganyaan mission, we will require some changes to be made and those modifications will be carried out at Sriharikota,” Sivan had told TOI.

Isro, which has planned at least two experimental flights of SSLV in the coming year, will also look at involving private players for development of future rockets. The space agency has been opening up opportunities for the private sector with the first official expression of interest (EOI) inviting private consortiums to build as many as five PSLVs issued in August this year.

While Isro had earlier allowed private players to assemble satellites, an EOI for launch vehicles was a major shift in the way Isro has been working over the decades. According to a senior official from the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), the cost of one fully integrated PSLV launch vehicle is Rs 200 crore. This means that the value of the deal Isro is offering private industry—to build five PSLVs—is at least Rs 1,000 crore.

Next for Isro: A mobile launchpad | India News - Times of India
Why on earth is ISRO so shy about strategic import of space program and averse to DRDO?
That doesn't bode well, trying to be 100% civilian program when almost all other space programs are joined at the hip with strategic rocketry. This holier than thou attitude will cost us on duplication and in harnessing the synergy of both organisation and their somewhat similar programs.

Having touched upon SSLV any ideas why S85 motor is designed so? Wouldn't a smaller first stage and comparitively bigger second stage provided for more delta V?
 
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Gautam

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Why on earth is ISRO so shy about strategic import of space program and averse to DRDO?
That doesn't bode well, trying to be 100% civilian program when almost all other space programs are joined at the hip with strategic rocketry. This holier than thou attitude will cost us on duplication and in harnessing the synergy of both organisation and their somewhat similar programs.
There has been exchanges of personnel and tech between our civilian programs and military programs since forever. Dr. Kalam is a good example, these exchanges continue on even today. However it is the stated policy of the Indian govt. to keep military and civilian programs separate on paper. This makes it easier for our global partners to say they are partnering with our civilian program and it has nothing to do with our military programs. Its just a verbal policy, nothing more, exchanges will continue as they have in the past.
Having touched upon SSLV any ideas why S85 motor is designed so? Wouldn't a smaller first stage and comparitively bigger second stage provided for more delta V?
I don't know really. The first stage is big, very big. Maybe it is do that dog leg maneuver to avoid Sri Lanka.