Indian Coast Guard : Updates & Discussion

RISING SUN

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Dec 3, 2017
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Indian Coast Guard Tows Drifting Crude Oil Tanker to Safety​

After days of monitoring the situation, the Indian Coast Guard intervened on Sunday, November 22, to reposition a disabled crude oil tanker that was drifting in an environmentally sensitive zone.

The Coast Guard reported that its vessel the Vishwast towed the Panama flagged tanker Anastasia I, which was drifting dangerously towards Kachall Island, part of the Nicobar Islands, at the southern end of the Bay of Bengal and located near the Malacca Strait.

The Anastasia I had unloaded her crude shipment in China and departed on October 24 making a stop at Singapore. The tanker is riding empty carrying approximately 910 tons of bunker fuel. The 103,000 dwt vessel, which measures 800 feet in length, departed Singapore on November 4 bound for Dubai, where she was expected to arrive on November 30.

Sailing with a crew of 24, the tanker blacked out on Thursday, November 19, and had been drifting since then. The Indian Coast Guard had been standing by with the cutter Vishwast and surveillance flights on one of its airplanes. The Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) in Port Blair, issued a navigational warning and international safety alert for vessels in the area.

According to Coast Guard, the vessel’s operator, based in India, had not responded to inquiries and had not provided a tug for assistance. When it was determined that the tanker was increasingly in danger of grounding, a Coast Guard team boarded Anastasia I making repairs, attaching a tow line, and preparing the anchor to be manually lowered. The Vishwast towed the tanker to a safer location.

Sri Lankan boat with 100 kg heroin seized by Indian Coast Guard; six crew members arrested​

Indian Coast Guard (ICG) Vaibhav has seized a Sri Lankan boat along with 100 kg heroin sourced from Pakistan along with 20 small packets of synthetic drugs in an operation on the high seas off Thoothukudi in Tamil Nadu.

The Indian Coast Guard issued a statement in which it said it has arrested six crew members in this connection and also seized five pistols from the accused.

Initial investigation revealed that the contraband was transferred to the Sri Lankan boat from a Pakistani dhow from Karachi.

According to the Coast Guard, they had received credible intelligence from the agencies on narcotics smuggling by Anti-National Elements. Since November 17, ICG ships and two aircraft had been carrying out extensive air-sea coordinated searches for the suspected boat in the most probable area as per the intelligence input.

The search operation at sea yielded results on Wednesday, November 24, when the boat was identified south of Tuticorin, after which ICGS Vaibhav stealthily followed the boat and carried out boarding operations at the opportune moment, while located about 10 NM off Kanyakumari.

99 packets of heroin, 20 boxes of synthetic drugs, and five 9mm pistols were unearthed from an unapproachable location on-board, besides a Thuraya satellite phone set.

Preliminary investigation of the crew has revealed that the drugs were transferred onto their Sri Lankan vessel ‘Shenaya Duwa’ on the high seas by a Pakistani dhow from Karachi and the contraband was meant to be sent to western countries and Australia.

Personnel deployed on Indian Coast Guard (ICG) ship Vaibhav seized the Sri Lankan boat along with the contraband during anti-smuggling operations that began on November 17.

"Joint interrogation of the arrested accused by all security agencies concerned is in progress," the Coast Guard said in a statement.

ICG ships Vaibhav, Vikram, Samar, Abhivav, and Aadesh, and a Coast Guard Dornier aircraft are involved in anti-smuggling operations, despite rough sea conditions.
 

aditya g

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OPVs world over are lightly armed as the mission simply does not require too much kinetic power. What we want from OPVs are;

- Cheap cost to purchase and operate.

- High availability rate (i.e. low turnaround, low maintenance schedule)

- Long legs at sea, especially in Indian context.

A well thought out fleet of OPVs will actually free up rest of the fleet to focus on their missions, and also save on machinery and engine time on the capital warships. For counter-piracy, counter-smuggling, fisheries patrol etc we simply do not need the firepower.

We have a large EEZ and ICG is going right way by adopting OPVs, not only they have added new platforms, but also expanded the force. In this context keeping OPVs cheap by saving on weapon cost has to be appreciated.

However, due to force expansion ICG has become a force of consequence, and at same time IN is under a lot of pressure due to Mission Based Deployments. It is natural to ask question on how these dozens of 2000 ton ICG ships are expected to contribute in war time?
 

raghu1974

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Nov 19, 2020
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OPVs world over are lightly armed as the mission simply does not require too much kinetic power. What we want from OPVs are;
- Cheap cost to purchase and operate.

- High availability rate (i.e. low turnaround, low maintenance schedule)

- Long legs at sea, especially in Indian context.

A well thought out fleet of OPVs will actually free up rest of the fleet to focus on their missions, and also save on machinery and engine time on the capital warships. For counter-piracy, counter-smuggling, fisheries patrol etc we simply do not need the firepower.

We have a large EEZ and ICG is going right way by adopting OPVs, not only they have added new platforms, but also expanded the force. In this context keeping OPVs cheap by saving on weapon cost has to be appreciated.

However, due to force expansion ICG has become a force of consequence, and at same time IN is under a lot of pressure due to Mission Based Deployments. It is natural to ask question on how these dozens of 2000 ton ICG ships are expected to contribute in war time?
You are right about asking questions. As long as these OPV's have enough free space, they could be retrofitted with Radars & Missiles to convert them into small missile boats or Corvettes. So the question is if there is space and can it be utilized to fit the radars & missiles.
 

Ginvincible

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Dec 5, 2017
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OPVs world over are lightly armed as the mission simply does not require too much kinetic power. What we want from OPVs are;

- Cheap cost to purchase and operate.

- High availability rate (i.e. low turnaround, low maintenance schedule)

- Long legs at sea, especially in Indian context.

A well thought out fleet of OPVs will actually free up rest of the fleet to focus on their missions, and also save on machinery and engine time on the capital warships. For counter-piracy, counter-smuggling, fisheries patrol etc we simply do not need the firepower.

We have a large EEZ and ICG is going right way by adopting OPVs, not only they have added new platforms, but also expanded the force. In this context keeping OPVs cheap by saving on weapon cost has to be appreciated.

However, due to force expansion ICG has become a force of consequence, and at same time IN is under a lot of pressure due to Mission Based Deployments. It is natural to ask question on how these dozens of 2000 ton ICG ships are expected to contribute in war time?

OPVs world over are lightly armed as the mission simply does not require too much kinetic power. What we want from OPVs are;

You are right about asking questions. As long as these OPV's have enough free space, they could be retrofitted with Radars & Missiles to convert them into small missile boats or Corvettes. So the question is if there is space and can it be utilized to fit the radars & missiles.

I think another benefit to having these "oversized" OPVs is the experience the shipyards gain from constructing them/getting supply chains formed to maintain them. Having the shipyards comfortable/highly capable with designing and launching ships of this size will go a long way to filling other requirements like minesweepers or the shallow water ASW corvettes.

I agree that the OPV's armaments seem small given their tonnage, but the ICG shouldn't be a war-fighting force anyways and the size of these vessels gives them space for upgrades when considering adapting for future threats in the EEZ. The important thing is having as many connected platforms patrolling the seas which can relay messages for support for situations they can't handle.
 
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aditya g

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You are right about asking questions. As long as these OPV's have enough free space, they could be retrofitted with Radars & Missiles to convert them into small missile boats or Corvettes. So the question is if there is space and can it be utilized to fit the radars & missiles.

1608936790102.png


Above picture shows the layout of the Samarth class OPV quite well. You could place some heavy weapons amidships, by sacrificing the RHIBs. The poop deck has cranes which can support dinghys though.

However, I don't think we are going as far as missiles and torpedoes. We are talking about a bigger gun, better sights and sensors and any cheaper weapons.
 
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Ashwin

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Procurement of Twin Engine Heavy Helicopters (TEHH).


26. The ICG is progressing a case for procurement of 14 Twin Engine Heavy Helicopters (TEHH). These helicopters will be deployed from shore-based stations and also have the capability of undertaking stage through operations from ICG ships. The TEHH will be capable of accomplishing Maritime Surveillance, SAR, medical evacuation and Pollution Response missions upto 200 Nm from coastline. Induction of these helicopters will enhance ICG capability to undertake multidimensional operations in the AoR. The AoN of DAC for procurement of 14 TEHH for ICG has been accorded on 20 Jan 2020 and RFP has been issued to four global vendors on 24 Jun 2020. As per present timelines, Contract for procurement of 14 TEHH is likely to be signed by Mar 2022. The aircraft are likely to be delivered to ICG by 2025-26.


27. Mid-Life Upgrade of 17 Coast Guard Dornier Aircraft. ICG has concluded a contract for mid-life upgrade of 17 Dornier Aircraft with M/s HAL(TAD), Kanpur on 07 Feb 2020.


28. The mid-life upgrade includes fitment of 20 state-of-the-art system/sensors viz Glass Cockpit, Mission Management System, Pollution Surveillance System (PSS), 12.7 mm AV Gun, Five blade propellers etc., onboard Dornier aircraft, which is in consonance with the envisaged growth of the ICG and to meet the future challenges of technological advancement. The first aircraft for upgrade is likely to be inducted by M/s HAL(TAD) in Sep 2021 and signaled out post upgrade by Jul 2022. The upgrade of all 17 Dornier aircraft will complete by Dec 2025.

 

aditya g

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This is the second time tender for TEHH has gone out. The first time Airbus H225M won (ex EC725) but contract could not be concluded in time. I hope Sikorsky S92 wins - its an excellent CG helicopter and is partially Made-in-India.

It's frustrating to see GOI is unable to encourage make-in-india by not awarding to S92 in the first place.

Having said that, why doesn't CG simply acquire more Dhruv? Indeed, it is a smaller helicopter - but can operate from ICG's OPVs.

Procurement of Twin Engine Heavy Helicopters (TEHH).


26. The ICG is progressing a case for procurement of 14 Twin Engine Heavy Helicopters (TEHH). These helicopters will be deployed from shore-based stations and also have the capability of undertaking stage through operations from ICG ships. The TEHH will be capable of accomplishing Maritime Surveillance, SAR, medical evacuation and Pollution Response missions upto 200 Nm from coastline. Induction of these helicopters will enhance ICG capability to undertake multidimensional operations in the AoR. The AoN of DAC for procurement of 14 TEHH for ICG has been accorded on 20 Jan 2020 and RFP has been issued to four global vendors on 24 Jun 2020. As per present timelines, Contract for procurement of 14 TEHH is likely to be signed by Mar 2022. The aircraft are likely to be delivered to ICG by 2025-26.


27. Mid-Life Upgrade of 17 Coast Guard Dornier Aircraft. ICG has concluded a contract for mid-life upgrade of 17 Dornier Aircraft with M/s HAL(TAD), Kanpur on 07 Feb 2020.


28. The mid-life upgrade includes fitment of 20 state-of-the-art system/sensors viz Glass Cockpit, Mission Management System, Pollution Surveillance System (PSS), 12.7 mm AV Gun, Five blade propellers etc., onboard Dornier aircraft, which is in consonance with the envisaged growth of the ICG and to meet the future challenges of technological advancement. The first aircraft for upgrade is likely to be inducted by M/s HAL(TAD) in Sep 2021 and signaled out post upgrade by Jul 2022. The upgrade of all 17 Dornier aircraft will complete by Dec 2025.

 

aditya g

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May 11, 2020
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With C-453 having joined the fleet, the ICG strength stands at 157 Ships & Boats and 62 Aircraft. Further,40 Ships are at various stages of construction at different shipyards in India, and 16 Advanced Light Helicopters MK III manufactured by M/s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, Bengaluru is also to be inducted into the force.


Any clues on what are these 40 ships under construction?

I can identify only 7 ships;

03 OPV Samarth Class GSL
02 OPV Vikram Class L&T
02 PCV (unnamed) GSL