Indian AESA Radar Developments

ni8mare

Well-Known member
Dec 7, 2017
246
681
India
HIGH POWER RADAR (HPR)

1. Description of Technology: The HPR is an Active Aperture Phased Array Radar based on Solid State Trans-Receive Modules. The Active Phased Array technology allows electronic scanning in azimuth as well as elevation. These radars have non-rotating design with planar arrays and provide 3600 coverage without the requirement of mechanical rotation. There is seamless transition of tracks from one planar array to another planar array. The HPR is able to detect targets of 2m2 RCS at a distance of 450 Km. The radar is to classify targets automatically and it has ECCM features.It is able to resolve target in four dimensions (4D) namely Range, Azimuth, Height and Doppler Velocity. The radar is equipped with ICAO & STANAG 4193 compliant IFF system with provision to operate independent of primary radar.

2. Installation and Maintenance aspect The Radar will be installed and integrated at the deployment site. It is capable of being sited up to an altitude of 3000m Above Mean Sea Level. It can withstand severe environment conditions.The HPR would be able to operate on a 24x7 basis with low maintenance requirements and will be integrated in the IACCS Network of IAF.

3. Performance evaluation The Field trials of the radar in integrated mode will be carried out at deployed location, to meet each parameters of the Radar Specification.

4. Realization Approach The design of radar is based on proven technology available with LRDE. 5 HPR – Four Wall Physical Configuration The illustrative picture of static four-wall physical configuration of HPR is shown as below

1528833970644.png
1528834000413.png
 

ni8mare

Well-Known member
Dec 7, 2017
246
681
India
Purchase of 12 indigenous high-power radars approved
IANS | New Delhi Last Updated at June 7, 2018 20:15 IST

The government on Thursday approved the procurement of indigenously designed and developed defence equipment worth Rs 5,500 crore which include 12 high-power radars to detect missile threats in high altitude areas.
The approval to buy the 'India-designed, developed and manufactured (IDDM) equipment was given at the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) meeting chaired by Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman

"Pursuing the goal of indigenization and self-reliance in the field of defence procurements, the DAC approved procurement of 12 high-power radars for the Indian Air Force," a defence spokesperson said in a statement.

The radars will provide long-range, medium- and high-altitude cover while detecting and tracking high-speed airborne targets following parabolic trajectories.

Technologically superior, the radars will have the capability to scan 360 degrees without mechanical rotation of antenna and will operate on 24X7 basis with minimal maintenance requirement.

"Their procurement will enhance the overall efficacy of the air defence network in the country," the statement said.
The Air Force had already specified that it would need radars with a capability to detect and track targets at 30-km altitude that can be deployed in high altitude areas and can counter electronic warfare and anti-radiation missiles.


The IAF possesses low to long range radars but is looking to modernize the air defence system of the country. Currently, the force uses a a mix of Russian and French systems like Thales radar which has 600 km range but has been in service for some decades.
The IAF is also looking to acquire Russian S-400 anti-aircraft missile defence system.

The acquisition council also accorded approval for procurement of hovercraft or air-cushion vehicles (ACVs) for the Indian Coast Guard and Indian Army.
These vessels would offer advantage over conventional boats and crafts. The air-cushion vehicles come with an ability to travel at very high speeds over shallow water, sand banks, mud-flats and swamps which are non-navigable by boats and small crafts.
"These (hover)craft offer capability enhancement for the services and would prove useful for amphibious and riverine operations, especially where there is a requirement to move men and material from one island to another island, across riverine terrain, creeks."
--IANS
sar/vd
(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
3,886
6,170
Bangalore
HIGH POWER RADAR (HPR)

1. Description of Technology: The HPR is an Active Aperture Phased Array Radar based on Solid State Trans-Receive Modules. The Active Phased Array technology allows electronic scanning in azimuth as well as elevation. These radars have non-rotating design with planar arrays and provide 3600 coverage without the requirement of mechanical rotation. There is seamless transition of tracks from one planar array to another planar array. The HPR is able to detect targets of 2m2 RCS at a distance of 450 Km. The radar is to classify targets automatically and it has ECCM features.It is able to resolve target in four dimensions (4D) namely Range, Azimuth, Height and Doppler Velocity. The radar is equipped with ICAO & STANAG 4193 compliant IFF system with provision to operate independent of primary radar.

2. Installation and Maintenance aspect The Radar will be installed and integrated at the deployment site. It is capable of being sited up to an altitude of 3000m Above Mean Sea Level. It can withstand severe environment conditions.The HPR would be able to operate on a 24x7 basis with low maintenance requirements and will be integrated in the IACCS Network of IAF.

3. Performance evaluation The Field trials of the radar in integrated mode will be carried out at deployed location, to meet each parameters of the Radar Specification.

4. Realization Approach The design of radar is based on proven technology available with LRDE. 5 HPR – Four Wall Physical Configuration The illustrative picture of static four-wall physical configuration of HPR is shown as below

View attachment 2683View attachment 2684
Awesome.

Hope they are working on maritime radar based on Arudhra AESA to replace Israeli systems.
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
8,638
6,060
India
Awesome.

Hope they are working on maritime radar based on Arudhra AESA to replace Israeli systems.
Too early to tell even if it is desirable. It's because of the Barak program. It's possible that our next line of ships after P-17A and P-15B will also likely be the MF-STAR based system since these ships will be in design today and there's no guarantee DRDO has an equivalent design ready. But who knows?

I hope our cruiser design has more indigenous systems, including new upcoming stuff like the XRSAM.
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
Staff member
Administrator
Nov 30, 2017
3,886
6,170
Bangalore
Too early to tell even if it is desirable. It's because of the Barak program. It's possible that our next line of ships after P-17A and P-15B will also likely be the MF-STAR based system since these ships will be in design today and there's no guarantee DRDO has an equivalent design ready. But who knows?

I hope our cruiser design has more indigenous systems, including new upcoming stuff like the XRSAM.
P-15B/P-17A orders are scheduled to complete by 2024-25. Now add 4-5 year building time for new design orders.

ie, DRDO has at least a decade to build an analog to MF-STAR. Considering our advancements in land and air-based AESA systems its not 'too early and desirable' .
 
  • Agree
Reactions: Angel Eyes

Milspec

सर्वदा शक्तिशाली; सर्वत्र विजय
Moderator
Dec 2, 2017
1,842
2,298
United States
Too early to tell even if it is desirable. It's because of the Barak program. It's possible that our next line of ships after P-17A and P-15B will also likely be the MF-STAR based system since these ships will be in design today and there's no guarantee DRDO has an equivalent design ready. But who knows?

I hope our cruiser design has more indigenous systems, including new upcoming stuff like the XRSAM.
cruiser?
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
8,638
6,060
India
P-15B/P-17A orders are scheduled to complete by 2024-25. Now add 4-5 year building time for new design orders.

ie, DRDO has at least a decade to build an analog to MF-STAR. Considering our advancements in land and air-based AESA systems its not 'too early and desirable' .
Any new SAM program will take 10 years at the minimum, not counting delays.

The way I see it, if there are follow on programs like P-17B and P-15C, then we will see the MF-STAR+Barak on it. If there are entirely new projects, then we will see our own fully indigenous SAM system, because it will take longer to finish.
 

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
12,639
8,158
Mumbai
Bigger, heavier ships coming up.
On the one hand you're perfectly comfortable accepting the fact the fact that we're short of funds and on the other , you're perfectly comfortable endorsing grandiose plans of the IN. I've a college mate in the IN in quite a senior position and he's not half as sanguine as you are about those plans . What makes you tick ?
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
8,638
6,060
India
On the one hand you're perfectly comfortable accepting the fact the fact that we're short of funds and on the other , you're perfectly comfortable endorsing grandiose plans of the IN. I've a college mate in the IN in quite a senior position and he's not half as sanguine as you are about those plans . What makes you tick ?
If we start now, it will be 2030 before we get the first of a new class of ships similar to the Type 055. There's nothing grandoise about it, it's just the next iteration of ships that will be built after 2024.

As we are today, we are currently building 15 capital warships, 4 Krivak-IIIs, 7 P17As and 4 P15Bs. So why is normal stuff surprising to you? We are in fact doing less than we should be.
 
Last edited:

Milspec

सर्वदा शक्तिशाली; सर्वत्र विजय
Moderator
Dec 2, 2017
1,842
2,298
United States
The follow-on ships that are coming up after P-15B. There is a new heavier ship with double the firepower being designed. We don't know the project name yet.
I dont think CCS has approved anything after the Vishakapatnam class, and even the follow-on to Vishakapatnam class will still be a bigger destroyer, not a Battle Cruiser.
 

_Anonymous_

Senior Member
Dec 4, 2017
12,639
8,158
Mumbai
The follow-on ships that are coming up after P-15B. There is a new heavier ship with double the firepower being designed. We don't know the project name yet.
It's not even on the drawing boards .I can assure you of that much . None of the top brass has a clue when would it be conceptualised although as a concept , it's more than 10 years old , if not older .
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
8,638
6,060
India
I dont think CCS has approved anything after the Vishakapatnam class, and even the follow-on to Vishakapatnam class will still be a bigger destroyer, not a Battle Cruiser.
Process-wise you are right there. I should have said it's in the pre-CCS stage instead. They basically play around with different designs first, then comes CCS approval and setting up QRs. We are more than a decade away.

And let me make it clear that when I say "cruiser", I am not talking about anything that's more than 2000T over the P15B. Even the Chinese call their 055 a destroyer, the Americans call the Zumwalt a destroyer too. So I don't want to get into the semantics of its definition. I am talking about a ship in a similar class as the 055 or Ticonderoga, and not the Kirov. The minute you said "battle cruiser" you went all WW2 there. But strictly, a cruiser is simply the biggest ship you've got. In effect, I am basically talking about a bigger destroyer than the ones we've got.

Anyway, if we are to see a follow-on to P15B, I doubt it's going to be bigger and heavier than it already is. It's already the perfect size.
 

randomradio

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2017
8,638
6,060
India
It's not even on the drawing boards .I can assure you of that much . None of the top brass has a clue when would it be conceptualised although as a concept , it's more than 10 years old , if not older .
Technically, when you say something's on the drawing board, it has to get CCS approval prior to that, until then it's all concept stage. But considering the navy designs their own stuff anyway, you can say the designs are already objective. The navy's concepts generally end up being close to what they want. Not the same as the army and air force who generally don't have a clue until the project actually begins.

Also, such things are not decided by the top brass in general, it's decided by a specific team. Like how the army's requirements for tanks is created by the DGMF and is run by a specific cell within the DGMF. So only a few people are actually involved.
 

ni8mare

Well-Known member
Dec 7, 2017
246
681
India
Active Electronically Scanned Array Radar (AESAR)

1535567264250.png


1. Description of Technology:

The AESA Radar is multimode, solid-state active phased array fire control Radar in X Band with modular and scalable architecture with graceful degradation that can be adapted for various types of airborne fighter class platforms.The Active Electronically Scanned Array is configured using large number of Transmit Receive Modules (TRM’s) to achieve the power aperture required for the Radar. The processing is achieved using state of the art Exciter Receiver Processor (ERP) optimised for use on fighter class platforms. Active phased array technology in the Radar enables user to achieve high mission reliability with multi-target tracking capability. The radar operational modes are designed to assist the fighter pilot in the execution of various combat missions in air-to-air, air-to-ground and air-to-sea operations.

2. Salient Features:

The AESA based fire control radar is capable of providing interleaved multi mode of operation to meet the operational requirements of the fighter aircraft. The radar has state of–the-art ECCM features. The Radar provides better situational awareness of the modern battlefield scenario. It is capable of tracking multiple targets with high accuracy suitable for fire control along with interleaved Air to Air, Air to Ground and Air to Sea modes in all terrain solution.


3. Application Areas

The AESA based fire control Radar can be configured for use on any fighter class aircraft.

Electronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), a premier lab under DRDO has developed state-of-art Radar systems and associated technologies.
 
Last edited:
  • Informative
Reactions: Angel Eyes and R!cK