Eurofighter Typhoon - Updates and Discussions

Ankit Kumar

Team StratFront
Nov 30, 2017
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Most advanced typhoons in the market. Sad that typhoons will lose in India.
What all stuff they are getting in the typhoon deal? Will they be getting meteors?
We couldn't afford it. Will be only slightly less than what export of F35 to a non partner would cost.

Like 15-20% more cost than Rafale.
 

BMD

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Dec 4, 2017
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john0496

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Nov 11, 2020
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This is weird. Egypt already has Rafales in numbers. And russian birds.
If it's done, this is a political deal, not an operational one.
 

BMD

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Dec 4, 2017
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This is weird. Egypt already has Rafales in numbers. And russian birds.
If it's done, this is a political deal, not an operational one.
Typhoon has got a new radar since the Rafale purchase.
 

Bon Plan

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Dec 1, 2017
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Typhoon has got a new radar since the Rafale purchase.
A brand new radar.
Even several new radars....
All mature? probably not. It lack years and years of fine tune. At least the Rafale AESA came with the full library of 15 years of PESA use.
 

BMD

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Dec 4, 2017
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A brand new radar.
Even several new radars....
All mature? probably not. It lack years and years of fine tune. At least the Rafale AESA came with the full library of 15 years of PESA use.
Whereas the Typhoon radar has undergone substantially more development and testing time. The Rafale AESA was more a Gen I AESA for marketing purposes.
 

_Anonymous_

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Dec 4, 2017
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Seems like that's all the Eurofighter is good for. Participating in air shows. Talk about making a hash of a good fighter aircraft program.

How many Eurofighters on order pending delivery by any of the member countries Paddy vis a vis how many JSFs on order by these same nations? You'd get your answer.
 
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Picdelamirand-oil

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Nov 30, 2017
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When is the ecrs mk2 supposed to be ready?

UK details revised schedule for Typhoon’s ECRS Mk2 radar introduction

Leonardo UK will deliver a first flight-test example of the ECRS Mk2 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar for the Eurofighter Typhoon before year-end, with the Royal Air Force’s (RAF’s) service introduction schedule for the combination now targeted at the end of this decade.

One of the RAF’s Tranche 3 Typhoons – aircraft BS116 (ZK355) – is now in the flight-test hangar at BAE Systems’ Warton site in Lancashire and set to enter the preparation phase for receiving the new radar system.

Following the completion of integration work and ground-based testing, the AESA system is expected to undergo flight-testing from late 2023, a Ministry of Defence (MoD) programme official says.

Ross Wilson, Leonardo UK’s radar chief engineer, says the company currently has the sensor in testing using its roof-top laboratory in Edinburgh. “It is real, tested equipment, and we are now testing software,” he says. Due to be transferred to Warton later this year, the system re-uses some equipment previously employed during a UK trials campaign named Bright Adder.

For the pending test phase, a spare radar also will be supplied to Warton, plus around “six additional items” to support work up to the initial operational capability (IOC) milestone being declared. At least two flight-test aircraft will be involved, along with personnel and additional assets from the RAF’s 41 Sqn test and evaluation unit.

The MoD says service introduction will represent the availability of “a robust capability, which means the training and support systems are [also] in place”, and offer “something that you can rely on and take to war”.

“You need something you can put your hand on and actually deliver and [have] work in an operational environment and in a way that you can sustain,” the MoD programme official notes. “Ukraine has adjusted our whole mindset,” they add.

“It’s not so much M-scan or E-scan: if you get the boxes behind the architecture right then you can do what you want,” the official says. “We must be able to adapt to the enemy quicker and cheaper. We have to win the financial war as an operator – you need to win the speed of adaptation. So it becomes a proxy between programmers.”

The UK will acquire ECRS Mk2 sensors to equip 40 Tranche 3 Typhoons, with the technology – which also will offer electronic attack functionality – to additionally be suitable for incorporation with Tranche 2 examples. At the time of the programme’s launch in September 2020 the IOC milestone was aimed at occurring in 2025; a schedule later revised to 2028.


Disclosing the revised 2030 expectation
during a Public Accounts Committee hearing on 28 February, UK Defence Equipment & Support chief executive Sir Simon Bollom noted: “It is more than a radar. It has to integrate with the defensive aids systems on the aircraft. It has to be part of the mission system in the aircraft. That is part of a bigger programme on Typhoon called P4E.” Integration activities on the Tranche 3 fleet will commence in 2026, he said.

Fresh funding for the ECRS 2 effort is due to be approved from late this year, with this to clear the way for production and equipment delivery.

Meanwhile, the RAF has made an early adoption of the latest TSP6-standard update for the Typhoon’s current Captor-M mechanically-scanned array. “That radar is absolutely singing right now,” the MoD official notes.

Separately, BAE is continuing flight testing from Warton of the P3EB capability update package for the Typhoon, using instrumented production aircraft IPA6, with around a dozen flights completed by 24 May.

Ground trials involving aircraft BS131 (ZK370) to prove updated functionality for the MBDA Brimstone air-to-surface missile also are being performed in support of a future P3EC modification, says Andy Flynn, Typhoon capability delivery director at BAE Systems Air.

Whereas the Typhoon radar has undergone substantially more development and testing time. The Rafale AESA was more a Gen I AESA for marketing purposes.
It is especially that the first developments were thrown away (CAESAR), because they did not work, so that the development of CAPTOR-E began only in 2014, that is to say 2 years after the RBE2 was operational.

CAPTOR-E​

These complications delayed significant progress until November 2014, when a €1 billion development and integration contract was signed by the four core Eurofighter partners. The chosen radar standard now included a repositioner (as opposed to the fixed plate of CAESAR). The radar’s name now also was changed to CAPTOR-E. Final test flight campaigns in the following years were funded by Kuwait and Qatar, the first customers of the baseline CAPTOR-E Mk0 radar. The first series production radar sets were delivered to the Kuwait Air Force in late 2021.

Due to greater capability requirements, the core nations had decided to opt for more advanced systems to be fielded for their Eurofighters. Germany and Spain have initiated a cooperation for a further upgrade of the radar, called CAPTOR-E Mk1/ECRS Mk1, whilst the United Kingdom and Italy have chosen a second development route via the ECRS Mk2 for their respective fleets. Details of these upgrade plans will be covered in a seperate article.

 

Picdelamirand-oil

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Ah, and then the T/R modules of the Captor-E will have a power of 8 W in 2030 while the T/R of the Rafale are 10 W since 2012 and we can offer these modules with a power of 14 W by changing the pump of the cooling circuit.
 
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Optimist

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Oct 31, 2021
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You say it as if it means something? The rafale has an obsolete backend and and an AESA antenna. Let me know when the new F4 radar is available and what it can do.

As with a sound system, where a 10w speaker can put out more sound than a 100w speaker. Raw output means little.

I haven't followed the eurofighter much. I'm surprised they aren't going GaN
 

Hydra

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Ah, and then the T/R modules of the Captor-E will have a power of 8 W in 2030 while the T/R of the Rafale are 10 W since 2012 and we can offer these modules with a power of 14 W by changing the pump of the cooling circuit.
Does rafale have any plan to introduce Radar capable of Jamming others, just like an EW suite.
 

Picdelamirand-oil

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You say it as if it means something? The rafale has an obsolete backend and and an AESA antenna. Let me know when the new F4 radar is available and what it can do.

As with a sound system, where a 10w speaker can put out more sound than a 100w speaker. Raw output means little.

I haven't followed the eurofighter much. I'm surprised they aren't going GaN
This means more range, and we compensate for our choice of a "small" nose, which gives an advantage from the point of view of stealth and aerodynamics, with more advanced technology, particularly for heat extraction.

With these modules, the Rafale's small radar has the same range performance as the F-35's radar, while retaining the advantages already mentioned.
 
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Optimist

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That is as I said, not necessarily true. It depends on the efficiency of the T/R. It is also a fact that the more you spike above the noise floor. The easier it is to detect, even with LPI.

More advanced? The rafale's radar is tarted up from the Mirage. This isn't a good street for you to go down.

You are getting quite delusional now. When you say it exceeds the capability of the F-35