Transport Helicopters of IAF - CH-47F Chinook, Mi-17v-5, Dhruv ALH etc.

T

Tarun



The Helicopter Division of the government-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has developed the Dhruv (Pole Star) advanced light helicopter (ALH), a light (5.5t class) multirole and multimission helicopter for army, air force, navy, coastguard and civil operations, for both utility and attack roles by day and night.
The helicopter, which is built to FAR 29 specifications, entered series production in 2000.

Orders and deliveries of the Indian helicopter
In all 18 Dhruv helicopters were delivered to Indian Defence Forces in 2000-2003 – eight to the army, three to the navy, four to the air force and three to the coast guard.
The army received its first three Dhruvs in March 2002. By June 2008, 76 helicopters had been delivered to the army and air force with 159 more on order. The Indian Navy has decided not to place any further orders.
The fleet of the Indian Air Force Display Team, Sarang (Peacock in English) includes the Dhruv helicopters.
In February 2011, HAL handed over five Dhruv mkIII advanced light helicopters to the Indian Army during the Aero India 2011 Air Show.
In June 2008, HAL received the first export order for the Dhruv – seven helicopters for the air force of Ecuador.
In August 2006, Indian Air Force and Coast Guard Dhruv helicopters were instrumental in rescue operations after devastating floods in India. Over 500 people were rescued.
"In February 2011, HAL handed over five Dhruv mkIII advanced light helicopters to the Indian Army during the Aero India 2011 Air Show."
In February 2007, the Dhruv was qualified for high-altitude / low-temperature operations in Kashmir and Jammu.
In August 2007, maiden flights took place of the Dhruv powered by the new Shakti engine and of the weaponised variant of the helicopter.
In September 2007, the Indian Army announced that the Dhruv was ready for deployment to the Siachen sector in the Himalayas. The helicopter was deployed to the high-altitude airbase at Manasbal (Srinagar) and, in October 2007, a Dhruv helicopter flew at a record altitude of 27,500ft in Siachen.
The advanced technologies incorporated in the Dhruv design include anti-resonance vibration isolation system (ARI), full authority digital electronic control (FADEC), hingeless main rotor, bearingless tail rotor, and an automatic flight control system.
Hindustan Aeronautics Limited and Israel Aircraft Industries have an agreement to market the Dhruv helicopter worldwide. IAI has developed an integrated helicopter avionics suite for the Dhruv, which includes day-and-night observation, electronic warfare suite, observation and targeting, and a flexible weapons carrying system.

Design of the Dhruv ALH
The helicopter is of conventional design and about two-thirds by weight of composite construction. The high tail boom allows easy access to the rear clamshell loading doors.
The four-bladed hingeless main rotor can be manually folded.
The blades are mounted between cruciform-shaped carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plates on a fibre elastomer constructed rotor head.
The helicopter is equipped with an active vibration control system developed by Lord Corporation of North Carolina that uses sensors to monitor on-board conditions and outputs signals to actuators to cancel fuselage floor vibrations.

Kevlar and carbon-fibre cockpit
The cockpit section of the fuselage is of Kevlar and carbon-fibre construction and is fitted with crashworthy seats.
The aircraft is equipped with a SFIM Inc. four-axis automatic flight control system.
The navigation suite includes a global positioning system, a Doppler navigation system, distance measuring equipment, a true air speed indicator, automatic direction finder, a heading reference system, radio altimeter, VHF omnidirectional ranger and instrument landing system (VOR/ILS) and marker beacons.
The communications suite includes HF, UHF, and VHF radio communications.

Weapons and armaments on the Dhruv
"The Dhruv’s countermeasures suite can include: radar and missile detectors, infrared jammer, chaff and flare dispensers."
The army and air force helicopters have stub wings fitted to carry up to eight anti-armour missiles, four air-to-air missiles or four rocket pods for 70mm and 68mm rockets.
In December 2006, Nexter Systems (formerly Giat) was awarded a contract for the installation of the THL 20 20mm gun turret on the first 20 Indian forces Dhruv helicopters. The turret is armed with the M621 low-recoil cannon and is combined with a helmet-mounted sight.
Weapon system integrated (WSI) versions for the Indian Army will be fitted with the Nag anti-tank missile, being developed by India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO). The Nag missile has imaging infrared guidance and a range of about 4km. The WSI variant will also have FLIR (forward-looking infrared), CCD (charge coupled device) camera and a target acquisition system with thermal sight and laser rangefinder.
The naval variant can carry two torpedoes or four anti-ship missiles.

Countermeasure capabilities
The Dhruv’s countermeasures suite can include: radar and missile detectors, infrared jammer, chaff and flare dispensers.
Saab Avitronics was awarded a serial production contract in December 2008 for the integrated defensive aids suite (IDAS) self-protection systems for Indian armed forces Dhruv helicopters. IDAS has also been fitted on Rooivalk, NH90 and Super Lynx 300 helicopters.

Advanced light helicopter cabin
The 7.3m³ cabin accommodates several layouts. As a passenger helicopter the cabin accommodates 12 or 14 seats.
A crew door and a rearward sliding door are installed on each side of the fuselage for the military helicopters.
The cargo compartment at the rear of the cabin has a volume of 2.16m³.
Clamshell doors at the rear of the cabin provide easy and fast access for loading and unloading cargo.
Configured as an air ambulance the helicopter can carry two stretcher patients and four survivors or medical attendants or four stretcher patients and two medical attendants.

Engines on the Indian multirole ALH
The helicopter has a twin-engine configuration allowing continued flight virtually throughout the flight envelope. The prototype helicopter is fitted with two Turbomeca TM 333-2C or 2B2 engines rated at 740kW take-off power.
A more powerful engine for the Dhruv, the Shakti (which carries the French name Ardiden 1H) rated at 900kW was developed under a cooperative agreement between HAL and Turbomeca and will be manufactured at Bangalore. Avio was selected to supply integrated dynamic systems (IDS) for the Shakti engine.
The first flight with the new engine took place in August 2007 and it was certified in 2008.
The helicopter is fitted with self-sealing crash-resistant tanks installed under the cabin floor. The fuel system includes cross feeding and fuel dumping systems. The maximum fuel capacity is 1,400l.

Helicopter landing gear
The air force and army helicopters are equipped with non-retractable metal skid landing gear. All variants of the helicopter are fitted with a tail skid to protect the tail rotor in tail-down landings.
FPT Industries, Portsmouth, UK, supplies the Kevlar flotation bags for the skid and wheeled variants of the helicopter. The helicopter can also be equipped with a liferaft.
 

Butter Chicken

Senior member
Dec 2, 2017
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HAL to offer technology to private sector to build helicopter

In the first such initiative, state-run aerospace behemoth Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) is ready to transfer the technology of its advanced light helicopter Dhruv to a domestic defence manufacturer for the commercial production of the chopper, official sources said.

HAL is in the process of identifying the private defence major with whom it will share the technology for the production of the twin-engine combat helicopter in India.

The private entity will have the option of selling the choppers or through HAL.

The indigenously designed and developed Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH-DHRUV) is a twin-engine, multi-role, multi-new generation helicopter in the 5.5-tonne weight class.

By March 2017, HAL had produced 228 Helicopters, including 216 for the Indian Armed Forces.

At present, it is executing an order for another 159 choppers for the Army and the Air Force.
 

GuardianRED

Call Sign "RED"
Dec 2, 2017
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HAL to offer technology to private sector to build helicopter

In the first such initiative, state-run aerospace behemoth Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) is ready to transfer the technology of its advanced light helicopter Dhruv to a domestic defence manufacturer for the commercial production of the chopper, official sources said.

HAL is in the process of identifying the private defence major with whom it will share the technology for the production of the twin-engine combat helicopter in India.

The private entity will have the option of selling the choppers or through HAL.

The indigenously designed and developed Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH-DHRUV) is a twin-engine, multi-role, multi-new generation helicopter in the 5.5-tonne weight class.

By March 2017, HAL had produced 228 Helicopters, including 216 for the Indian Armed Forces.

At present, it is executing an order for another 159 choppers for the Army and the Air Force.
Sorry the logic behind this move?.. Isn't HAL a production house themselves
 

GuardianRED

Call Sign "RED"
Dec 2, 2017
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Dear Sir,

Not enough capacity, not enough money.
???? Not enough Capacity ???

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will lay the foundation stone of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited's (HAL) new helicopter facility on Sunday at Karnataka's Bidarehallikaval village.
Located 110 km from here, the new facility will manufacture up to 10 classes of helicopters including Light Combat Helicopter (LCH), Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) and Naval Multi-role Helicopters (NMRH).

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility Sunday

Not enough Money??? - explain!?
 

Bharath

Technical Staff
Dec 1, 2017
792
998
Boston
Sorry the logic behind this move?.. Isn't HAL a production house themselves
increase series production while HAL can also continue Series production + upgrades, improvements.

tweaking and fine tuning of production line can be outsourced to private players while creating upgrades and improving performance can be the core competency of HAL.
 

bonobashi

Well-Known member
Dec 3, 2017
889
410
???? Not enough Capacity ???

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility

Prime Minister NarendraModi will lay the foundation stone of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited's (HAL) new helicopter facility on Sunday at Karnataka's Bidarehallikaval village.
Located 110 km from here, the new facility will manufacture up to 10 classes of helicopters including Light Combat Helicopter (LCH), Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) and Naval Multi-role Helicopters (NMRH).

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility Sunday

Not enough Money??? - explain!?
Dear Sir,

Before you get a heart attack, please see the sensible post immediately below yours.
 
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Bharath

Technical Staff
Dec 1, 2017
792
998
Boston
Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has signed a contract for 41 indigenously developed Dhruv Advanced Light Helicopters (ALH) for the Army and Navy.

“The contracts for supply of 41 ALHs amounting to around Rs 6100 crore will be executed in a period of 60 months,” HAL said in a statement on Monday. Of these 40 helicopters are for the Army and one for the Navy.

reoprt from september 5 2017:
HAL signs contract for 41 Dhruv helicopters
 
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Reactions: Sathya

Antiguy

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Dec 6, 2017
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???? Not enough Capacity ???

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility

Prime Minister NarendraModi will lay the foundation stone of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited's (HAL) new helicopter facility on Sunday at Karnataka's Bidarehallikaval village.
Located 110 km from here, the new facility will manufacture up to 10 classes of helicopters including Light Combat Helicopter (LCH), Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) and Naval Multi-role Helicopters (NMRH).

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility Sunday

Not enough Money??? - explain!?
you must be a leftist actively promoting the public sector instead of private sector
 

GuardianRED

Call Sign "RED"
Dec 2, 2017
484
383
you must be a leftist actively promoting the public sector instead of private sector
Yes i was there with PM Modi - breaking ground and laying the foundation stone!

Please come back to the living and make a sensible post~
 

Abingdonboy

Team StratFront
Dec 1, 2017
149
370
UK
Sorry the logic behind this move?.. Isn't HAL a production house themselves
Pretty simple bro

1) HAL is moving focus onto IMRH (with LUH and LCH development also in advanced stages), ALH has been "their baby" for a long long time but R&D efforts are all but expended (minor updates will come here and there but there't no need to devote the same resources) hence HAL also want to offload some (eventually all?) ALH production to a pvt entity to reduce HAL's overheads and open up a new revenue stream
2) Capacity building within the pvt sector is a long established but as yet unrealised goal of the GoI.

This move is very much in line with how HAL has been moving in recent times, the LCA project itself has almost attained HAL's 70% outsourcing target to the pvt sector. The natural progression will be to tie up with pvt players from inception of upcoming projects, let's hope so- DRDO certainly are waking up to this (see TATA-DRDO Kestral).


Surely it's better that the indian pvt sector starts working with DPSUs rather than signing up with every foreign OEM on the planet to push their goods into the Indian market at the cost of Indian projects? Wonder what kind of effect this kind of outsourcing will have, will it incentivise HAL to modernise their own production approaches? Maybe they will just outsource all future production efforts, set high goals and reap the rewards. It certainly seems as though HAL wants to become more of a R&D company and lead integrator and not a nuts and bolts manufacturer.

???? Not enough Capacity ???

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility

Prime Minister NarendraModi will lay the foundation stone of Hindustan Aeronautics Limited's (HAL) new helicopter facility on Sunday at Karnataka's Bidarehallikaval village.
Located 110 km from here, the new facility will manufacture up to 10 classes of helicopters including Light Combat Helicopter (LCH), Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) and Naval Multi-role Helicopters (NMRH).

Modi to lay foundation of HAL's copter facility Sunday

Not enough Money??? - explain!?
As stated in the article bro, this is to make the LUH and LCH.
 
T

Tarun




This is how cockpit of Indian Dhruv Mk-3 Advanced Light Helicopter looks like........!

The cockpit of Dhruv is made of Kevlar and carbon-fibre along crashworthy seats.

The aircraft is equipped with a SFIM Inc. four-axis automatic flight control system.
The navigation suite includes a global positioning system, a Doppler navigation system, distance measuring equipment, an air speed indicator, automatic direction finder, a heading reference system, radio altimeter, VHF omnidirectional ranger and instrument landing system (VOR/ILS) and marker beacons those are displayed in cockpit.
The communications suite includes HF, UHF, and VHF radio communications.
 
T

Tarun

More participation of private enterprises needed in Aerospace sector
Monday, December 11, 2017
By: Outlook India



There is a need for a larger ecosystem of private enterprises to transform themselves for greater participation in the aerospace sector to support the Government's 'Make in India' initiative, Raksha Rajya Mantri Dr Subhash Bhamre said on Saturday.

While speaking at a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Summit under Make-in-India held at HAL Nashik, he stated that it is a welcome move that private organisations, including MSMEs, are being engaged in Design and Development of products and technologies.

"Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has been instrumental in nurturing a competitive aviation eco-system in India by way of collaborating with private industries as outsourced partners, with more than 30 percent of HAL's man-hours being outsourced including several critical work packages," Bhamre added.

Bhamre further said that HAL's facility is of national importance and with the availability of state-of-the art infrastructure and expertise built over the years, additional orders on HAL would help Indian Air Force (IAF) bridge the gap between the existing and desired squadron strength in the shortest possible time.

HAL is also likely to float Request For Information (RFI) soon for identifying the Indian Private Agency that can produce Dhruv helicopters in future. Considering the increasing need of helicopters in civil operations of the country, this will be a mega deal from HAL, which is the OEM and Licensor.

"The company is keen to encourage private partnership in all its activities and as a major step, it would like to offer the indigenous helicopter 'ALH Dhruv' (Civil version) for manufacturing to select Indian private companies through Transfer of Technology," noted T. Suvarna Raju, CMD, HAL.

source: www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/more-participation-of-private-enterprises-needed-in-aerospace-sector/1206462
 

Ashwin

Agent_47
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Nov 30, 2017
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Mi-8’s saga comes to an end

The IAF is phasing out the Mi-8 helicopters
“It was probably the aircraft that was shot at the most,” says Air Marshal P.P. Rajkumar about the Mi-8 helicopter. He has logged more than 3,000 hours on the aircraft and has no hesitation in declaring that the most-produced helicopter in the world is a colossus.
The Mi-8 covered itself in glory and bullet wounds in the Siachen, during the IPKF operations in Sri Lanka and a UN Mission in Congo, besides coming under fire from insurgents in the North East. It has been part of several scientific expeditions to Antarctica. Now it is being phased out.
“The emotional bond we forged with the Mi-8 (also called Pratap in the IAF) was strong. Most of us started flying it in our 20s and probably associated more with the helicopter than with anyone else,” says Rajkumar. He knows engineers who remember the numbers of the aircraft they worked on even today long after they have forgotten their colleagues’ names.

Arrived in crates

The Mi-8s were inducted into the IAF in 1972 when they arrived in crates from erstwhile USSR to Mumbai where they were assembled and test-flown by Russian and Indian teams before being despatched to their first unit in Assam. Having the Russians service the aircraft was an expensive business and soon IAF personnel took over its complete maintenance. Air Vice Marshal R. Somnath, an engineer who has worked with the Mi-8 for decades, proudly says, “Our engineers were second to none. They primped and primed the aircraft for its sorties – flood relief, military operations or VVIP movement.”
Somnath recalls how two Mi-8s were modified and made ready for the Shimla Agreement in 1972. One was to fly President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto of Pakistan and his daughter Benazir Bhutto, and the other Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. The original purely functional bucket seats were replaced with fancier seats re-appropriated from the L-1049 Super Constellation. “The Super Constellations were lying with Air India and they were only too happy to hand over eight seats to us,” says Somnath. The seats were installed in the Mi-8s after careful and crucial modifications and the VVIPs made that 20-minute flight from Chandigarh to Shimla and back in comfort!
Air Commodore RM Sridharan, who has flown many VIPs including Pope John Paul II (who gifted him with a rosary and blessed him), Margaret Thatcher during the CHOGM retreat at Goa, recalls his last trip with Indira Gandhi. It was on October 30, 1984, during a tour of Orissa. “From Gopalpur, we flew her to Bhubaneswar airport. The following morning as we were ferrying the Mi-8 back to Delhi we heard of her assassination!” On landing at Delhi, Sridharan was detailed to be in the funeral parade. “Days after I had flown her, I walked 15 km on her funeral route.”
Former Air Chief Fali Major was a founding member of the VVIP Helicopter Flight in Palam, Delhi, from where the Mi-8s flew only VVIPs. He calls the Mi-8 ‘iconic’ and, like most other Mi-8 Air Warriors, also describes it as ‘forgiving’. “We were in Kashmir valley. We had already flown several sorties from a place called Gurez to various forward posts. We wouldn’t switch off between each sortie but in our third or fourth landing at Gurez, we noticed the ground crew gesticulating frantically to us to switch off. Not very pleased, we did; only to find out that, instead of turbine fuel, our helicopter was flying on high-octane fuel!” Major says he also has the dubious distinction of being involved in the first Mi-8 accident in Chalunka, Ladakh. “Instead of four cross bolts, only two anchored the rotor to the helicopter fuselage that had already flown over 350 hours before they sheared off on that fateful day!”

Engineering marvel

For Group Captain Ravi Kumar, an engineer, an incident that stands out in his memory is a weekend at Yelahanka, Bengaluru. “An Mi-8 was returning to base from an assignment and, to our horror, we saw its left main wheel was missing as it approached for landing. It must have dropped off mid-flight! We took a snap decision to do something perhaps never done before; we fixed the wheel on the helicopter even as it hovered and the Mi-8 landed, safely!” Ravi Kumar calls the Mi-8 an engineering marvel, robust and simple in design and technology.

Thousands of sorties

The helicopter has flown thousands of sorties during natural calamities and Wing Commander Yella Reddy was one of the pilots who scrambled on receiving news that a bus had been swept into a river 60 km north of Cudappah at a place called Chagalamarri. The water had flooded the bus and its 65 occupants had clambered on to its roof where they spent the night.
“We began operations and, with the weather, fuel and the setting sun stacked against us, we began winching up the stranded. We knew that the passengers had to be pulled to safety as they would not survive another night on the bus rooftop. In between dashing back to Cudappah for refuelling we rescued them all, well after the sun had set. The solid Mi-8 made this possible.”
R.K. Sharma, the Commanding Officer of 112 HU in Yelahanka, was not even born when the magnificent machine was inducted into the IAF and he says, “It is emotional for me. As a rookie pilot, I was trained in this helicopter and now I will go down in IAF History as I fly it for one last time.”

Mi-8’s saga comes to an end