Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model

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Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model

Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model
January 1, 2020, 3:19 AM GMT



Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen talks during a graduation ceremony for the Investigation Bureau agents in New Taipei City,
TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday the island would not accept a "one country, two systems" political formula Beijing has suggested could be used to unify the democratic island, saying such an arrangement had failed in Hong Kong.

China claims Taiwan as its territory, to be brought under Beijing's control by force if necessary. Taiwan says it is an independent country called the Republic of China, its official name.

Tsai, who's seeking re-election in a Jan. 11 vote, also vowed in a New Year's speech to defend Taiwan's sovereignty, saying her government would build a mechanism to safeguard freedom and democracy as Beijing ramps up pressure on the island.

Fear of China has become a major element in the campaign, boosted by months of anti-government protests in Chinese-ruled Hong Kong.

"Hong Kong people have showed us that 'one country, two systems' is definitely not feasible," Tsai said, referring to the political arrangement that guaranteed certain freedoms in the former British colony of Hong Kong after it was returned to China in 1997.

"Under 'one country, two systems', the situation continues to deteriorate in Hong Kong. The credibility of 'one country, two systems' has been sullied by the government's abuse of power," Tsai said.

Hong Kong has been hit by months of anti-government protests triggered by widespread resentment of perceived efforts by Beijing to exert control of the city despite the promises of autonomy.

Taiwan's parliament passed an anti-infiltration law on Tuesday to combat perceived threats from China, further straining ties between Taiwan and Beijing. [nL4N295146]

Tsai said the law will protect Taiwan's democracy and cross-strait exchanges will not be affected amid worries that the legislation may damage business ties with China.

China suspects Tsai and her independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party of pushing for the island's formal independence, and has threatened it with war if there was any such move.

Tsai denies seeking independence and reiterated that she would not unilaterally change the status quo with China.
 
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BMD

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Using Hong Kong as a model for unification would be like using a car wreck as a basis for a coupe.
 

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Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model

Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model
January 1, 2020, 3:19 AM GMT



Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen talks during a graduation ceremony for the Investigation Bureau agents in New Taipei City,
TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday the island would not accept a "one country, two systems" political formula Beijing has suggested could be used to unify the democratic island, saying such an arrangement had failed in Hong Kong.

China claims Taiwan as its territory, to be brought under Beijing's control by force if necessary. Taiwan says it is an independent country called the Republic of China, its official name.

Tsai, who's seeking re-election in a Jan. 11 vote, also vowed in a New Year's speech to defend Taiwan's sovereignty, saying her government would build a mechanism to safeguard freedom and democracy as Beijing ramps up pressure on the island.

Fear of China has become a major element in the campaign, boosted by months of anti-government protests in Chinese-ruled Hong Kong.

"Hong Kong people have showed us that 'one country, two systems' is definitely not feasible," Tsai said, referring to the political arrangement that guaranteed certain freedoms in the former British colony of Hong Kong after it was returned to China in 1997.

"Under 'one country, two systems', the situation continues to deteriorate in Hong Kong. The credibility of 'one country, two systems' has been sullied by the government's abuse of power," Tsai said.

Hong Kong has been hit by months of anti-government protests triggered by widespread resentment of perceived efforts by Beijing to exert control of the city despite the promises of autonomy.

Taiwan's parliament passed an anti-infiltration law on Tuesday to combat perceived threats from China, further straining ties between Taiwan and Beijing. [nL4N295146]

Tsai said the law will protect Taiwan's democracy and cross-strait exchanges will not be affected amid worries that the legislation may damage business ties with China.

China suspects Tsai and her independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party of pushing for the island's formal independence, and has threatened it with war if there was any such move.

Tsai denies seeking independence and reiterated that she would not unilaterally change the status quo with China.


China had a chance to sell Hong Kong model to Taiwan, but they blew it by sabotaging Hong Kong democracy.

China passed a law in 2014 that say only peoples nominated by communist party can run for election in Hong Kong, essentially killing one country two system, which is the starting point of Hong Kong anti PRC agitation.
 

randomradio

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Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model

Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model
January 1, 2020, 3:19 AM GMT



Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen talks during a graduation ceremony for the Investigation Bureau agents in New Taipei City,
TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday the island would not accept a "one country, two systems" political formula Beijing has suggested could be used to unify the democratic island, saying such an arrangement had failed in Hong Kong.

China claims Taiwan as its territory, to be brought under Beijing's control by force if necessary. Taiwan says it is an independent country called the Republic of China, its official name.

Tsai, who's seeking re-election in a Jan. 11 vote, also vowed in a New Year's speech to defend Taiwan's sovereignty, saying her government would build a mechanism to safeguard freedom and democracy as Beijing ramps up pressure on the island.

Fear of China has become a major element in the campaign, boosted by months of anti-government protests in Chinese-ruled Hong Kong.

"Hong Kong people have showed us that 'one country, two systems' is definitely not feasible," Tsai said, referring to the political arrangement that guaranteed certain freedoms in the former British colony of Hong Kong after it was returned to China in 1997.

"Under 'one country, two systems', the situation continues to deteriorate in Hong Kong. The credibility of 'one country, two systems' has been sullied by the government's abuse of power," Tsai said.

Hong Kong has been hit by months of anti-government protests triggered by widespread resentment of perceived efforts by Beijing to exert control of the city despite the promises of autonomy.

Taiwan's parliament passed an anti-infiltration law on Tuesday to combat perceived threats from China, further straining ties between Taiwan and Beijing. [nL4N295146]

Tsai said the law will protect Taiwan's democracy and cross-strait exchanges will not be affected amid worries that the legislation may damage business ties with China.

China suspects Tsai and her independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party of pushing for the island's formal independence, and has threatened it with war if there was any such move.

Tsai denies seeking independence and reiterated that she would not unilaterally change the status quo with China.

Taiwan should suggest the politburo can only be "elected" by the Taiwanese then.
 

BMD

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China had a chance to sell Hong Kong model to Taiwan, but they blew it by sabotaging Hong Kong democracy.

China passed a law in 2014 that say only peoples nominated by communist party can run for election in Hong Kong, essentially killing one country two system, which is the starting point of Hong Kong anti PRC agitation.
Plus the deportation to the mainland clause that was added later
 

Volcano

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Plus the deportation to the mainland clause that was added later


Xijinping is a pure Leninist. He seeks absolute control over everything unlike his predecessors who were willing to tolerate democratic Hong Kong as long as it serves long term national interest of Chinese reunification. Xijinping's polices are going to be disastrous for China in long term.

1)Hong Kong laws 2014 &2019 , sabotaging democratic set up.
2)Internal CPC purge of all potential leaders and future rivals, removing term limit and essentially making him president for life.
3)Xinjian purge ( In 2007, xinjian saw even bigger ethnic tensions, but then president Hu-jintao never went full Leninist purge. He did crushed Uyghur violence, but way softer.)
4)He essentially made a cult around him similar to Mao, something that was considered not so communist by post Mao CPC leaders. you will see a picture of Xi in every corner of every city with propaganda banner, something which you don't see few years back.


All this seems to suggest that this Chinese government is not willing to accommodation, and there is no chance of anyone in Taiwan buying into "One country, Two system" offer.
 
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BMD

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Beijing loathe to ease pressure despite Taiwan election landslide

Beijing loathe to ease pressure despite Taiwan election landslide
By Jerome TAYLOR, Amber WANG
Taipei (AFP) Jan 12, 2020

China's campaign to isolate Taiwan has backfired spectacularly with voters handing President Tsai Ing-wen a landslide second term -- but authoritarian Beijing is unlikely to abandon its diplomatic cudgel anytime soon, analysts say.

Tsai's re-election on Saturday with a record 8.2 million votes, or 57 percent, was a forceful rebuke of Chinese President Xi Jinping's push to heap economic and diplomatic pressure on the self-ruled island.

But this attempt to encourage support for the more Beijing-friendly opposition pushed Taiwanese voters instead in droves towards Tsai and her Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), which leans towards independence.

The result keeps Taiwan on a collision course with its giant neighbour -- which views the island as its own territory and has vowed to one day seize it, by force if necessary.

"Beijing will want to quickly put the squeeze on a second Tsai term, poaching allies and reducing its international space and perhaps increasing demonstrations of military might," Jonathan Sullivan, a Taiwan expert at Britain's University of Nottingham, told AFP.

"A Tsai victory means that Beijing will likely not just maintain (its) policies but seek to increase the pressure," added Clayton Dube at the University of Southern California.

Beijing loathes Tsai because she refuses to abide by their view that Taiwan is part of "one China".

It has long warned that any formal declaration of independence would be a red line that could spark an invasion -- a move that could push China into direct conflict with the US, which remains Taiwan's main military ally.

- Deliberate ambiguity -

While Chinese state media portrays Tsai as an independence advocate -- and many in her DPP party favour a formal declaration -- Tsai holds a deliberately more ambiguous stance.

She maintains that Taiwan is already a sovereign nation and argues that only its 23 million inhabitants, not Beijing, should decide the island's future.

After she was first elected in 2016, Tsai reached out for cross-strait talks without preconditions.

But China responded by cutting off official communication with her government, ramping up military drills and turning the screw on the economy by drastically reducing mainland tourists.

It also poached seven of Taiwan's remaining diplomatic allies, leaving just 15 nations that still recognise the island as a legitimate country.

Rather than cave, Tsai moulded herself as a defender of liberal democratic values.

During her campaign for re-election, she also repeatedly invoked the political unrest in nearby Hong Kong as a warning of what might await Taiwan should Beijing take control.

The plan worked -- 1.3 million more people voted for her in 2020 than 2016.

Her main rival Han Kuo-yu from the Kuomintang party (KMT), who pushed for warmer ties with China, won just 39 percent of the vote.

"If Beijing's goal was to compel unification then they have certainly failed," Bonnie Glaser, from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, told AFP.

"Polls (in Taiwan) consistently show that support for unification is waning and support for independence is growing, with the majority still supporting the preservation of the status quo," she added.

- Peace, dialogue -

During her victory speech on Saturday night, Tsai repeated her offer of talks with Beijing.

"Peace, parity, democracy and dialogue are the keys to stability," she said, adding Taiwan would "never concede to threats".

But the initial response from across the strait suggests an olive branch is unlikely.

In a commentary on Sunday, Chinese state news agency Xinhua accused Tsai of using "dirty tactics such as cheating, repression and intimidation", without citing evidence or examples.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told Xinhua he hoped the international community would "understand and support the just cause of Chinese people to oppose the secessionist activities for 'Taiwan independence' and realise national reunification".

Hung Chin-fu, an analyst at Taiwan's National Cheng Kung University, said Beijing would bide its time in responding to Tsai's landslide victory, but a U-turn was unlikely.

"I think it's not to Beijing's political advantage to take immediate aggressive actions against Taiwan and it will take some time to wait and see," he said.

One way to pressure Tsai might be to secure another quick diplomatic defection.

Fabrizio Bozzato, a research fellow at the University of Rome La Sapienza, said the Vatican -- the only place in Europe that still recognises Taiwan over China -- was a vulnerable scalp for Beijing to take.

"The Vatican would likely respond positively for the sake of achieving an historic deal with China," he said.

"Pope Francis appears to be determined to go down in history as the Pope who opened the door of China."

The state of Taiwan: Five things to know
Taipei (AFP) Jan 11, 2020 - Taiwan, which is voting for a new president and parliament, has been politically separated from China for the last seven decades but faces the threat of attack by Beijing should it ever declare independence.

Here are some key facts about the self-ruled democratic island, which has its own currency, flag, military and government but is not recognised as an independent state by the UN and most nations.

- China split -

After being defeated by the Communist Party in 1949, China's Kuomintang (KMT) nationalist government fled to the island province of Taiwan 180 kilometres (110 miles) off the mainland.

President Chiang Kai-shek, joined by two million supporters, set up his authoritarian Republic of China (ROC) government in Taipei. This remains Taiwan's official name.

The Communists established the People's Republic of China in Beijing, and have since insisted the island must be reintegrated, threatening force should it declare independence.

In 1991 Taiwan lifted emergency rule, unilaterally ending the state of war with China, and has emerged a vibrant liberal democracy. The first direct talks between Beijing and Taipei were held two years later.

Relations plummeted with the 2016 election of President Tsai Ing-wen, whose Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) rejects Beijing's "one China" principle.

In a historical irony, the modern-day version of the Kuomintang is the party that now pushes much warmer ties with communist China.

- Struggle for recognition -

Today home to 23 million people, the island has been progressively squeezed off the international stage by the more powerful Beijing.

The ROC government held a seat at the United Nations until the world body switched recognition to Beijing in 1971, and other countries and international groups soon followed suit.

Washington switched diplomatic recognition to Beijing in 1979, agreeing it was the only representative of China.

But the United States has remained deliberately ambiguous on Taiwan's future status and is bound by an act of Congress to maintain de facto diplomatic ties, as well as supply the island with weapons to defend itself.

Over the years, Beijing has convinced most countries to sever diplomatic ties with Taipei and keep it out of international bodies such as the World Health Organization.

Last year the Solomon Islands and Kiribati became the latest to defect, leaving Taiwan recognised by just 15 states -- most of them minnows in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Pacific, as well as the Vatican.

- Electronics giant -

Taiwan's export-based economy is one of the largest in Asia, but is dwarfed by that of China on which it depends for much of its business.

Transformed into a major tech manufacturing hub, the island is home to industry giants such as Foxconn, the world's largest electronic devices manufacturer, which assembles gadgets for major brands including Apple and Huawei.

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) is the world's leading contract microchip maker, also supplying Apple and other tech giants.

Despite the global trade war, Taiwan posted third-quarter GDP growth of 2.9 percent last year, far outpacing neighbours such as Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Japan.

- Asian pioneer -

Last May, Taiwan became the first place in Asia to legalise gay marriage. It held its first same-sex weddings days later.

It is also a leader in gender equality, with 38 percent of seats in the 2016-elected parliament held by women, the highest proportion in Asia.

Tsai, who is running for re-election, is its first female president.

Taipei 101 was the world's tallest building, at more than 500 metres (1,670 feet), until 2010 when it was overtaken by Dubai's Burj Khalifa.

- Indigenous inhabitants -

The vast majority of Taiwan's population are Han Chinese, with just two percent from its original indigenous tribes.

Most scholars consider Taiwan and parts of Southeast Asia as the original source of the Austronesians, who include people in the Pacific and Southeast Asia, as well as New Zealand's Maoris, and Polynesians in Hawaii.

Taiwan's indigenous people suffered cultural and economic catastrophe once settlers landed on the island's shores from the 17th century.

Tsai, the first president with partial indigenous ancestry, via her grandmother, made history in 2016 when she formally apologised for the past.

But indigenous groups remain marginalised, with wages about 40 percent below the national average and higher unemployment.
 
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China is blaming everyone but itself for Taiwan’s presidential election result

China is blaming everyone but itself for Taiwan’s presidential election result
By Isabella Steger1 hour ago

FROM OUR OBSESSION
Because China
Even small changes in China have global effects.




There’s little doubt that Beijing’s Taiwan strategy isn’t working, but it just doesn’t want to hear about it.

The landslide victory of president Tsai Ing-wen in last weekend’s (Jan. 11) election had been forecast by pollsters and analysts for months, citing in particular growing fears among voters that Taiwan could end up like Hong Kong if it did not stand up against China’s growing encroachment. People went for a president who was steadfast in her support of the Hong Kong protests and in her rejection of closer ties with Beijing at the expense of Taiwan’s freedom, unlike Tsai’s opponent Han Kuo-yu of the Kuomintang party, who pushed for closer ties with China, even though Beijing effectively cut off ties with Taipei following Tsai’s election in 2016.

In Hong Kong, many have joked Tsai should thank Chinese leader Xi Jinping and Hong Kong chief Carrie Lam for her victory, as the government’s unresponsiveness to protest demands, along with aggressive policing, tarnished the “one country, two systems” model Beijing had hoped Taiwan could accept.

However, Taiwan has been heading in this direction for years. Surveys consistently show that more and more of its people identify only as Taiwanese, and not as Chinese, particularly among the younger generation. The Hong Kong protests have only amplified those trends. Those who support outright independence have also been growing. China claims Taiwan as its own territory and sees unification with Taiwan as a historical inevitability, and has repeatedly threatened to use force to that end if needed. The Chinese Communist Party has never ruled over Taiwan.

Like the local elections in Hong Kong in November which saw pro-democracy forces also win by a landslide, it appears that Beijing was blindsided once again. As in the case of Hong Kong, Beijing either once again misread the public mood, or was receiving inaccurate intelligence, possibly by officials reluctant to state the truth to leaders at the top of the party.

As such, Beijing has reached for the usual scapegoats to explain how its preferred candidate lost. State news agency Xinhua, for example, accused Tsai (link in Chinese) of using “dirty tactics” including vote-buying, misinformation campaigns online, and intimidation to garner votes, calling the overall operation “green terror” in reference to the color representing Tsai’s camp. It also blamed “dark forces” for the result, without elaborating. Nationalist tabloid Global Times said Tsai “wantonly hyped up” the threat from China to influence the election.

Xinhua also mentioned that “Western political forces” manipulated the election amid a time of heightening US-China tensions, and accused countries of using the Hong Kong issue to “fan the flames” and “mislead Taiwanese people.” The foreign ministry castigated the dozens of countries who offered their congratulations to Tsai, including the US and Japan, accusing them of violating the “One China” principle, or the belief that Taiwan and China are part of the same country. Wang Yi, the country’s foreign minister, also said that those who split the country will “leave a stink for 10,000 years.”

The pronouncements from Beijing and its mouthpieces echo those that have been made with regards to the Hong Kong protests, with officials frequently resorting to blaming foreign forces for the unrest. The strategy generally plays well to its nationalistic domestic audience, many of whom see no room for compromise on the question of Taiwanese sovereignty and accept the Beijing government’s propaganda.

Still, some Chinese citizens observed Tsai’s record election win and saw holes in the propaganda. Among the comments below a Global Times post about the Taiwan election on social network Weibo, for example, one said that the election result showed that the tabloid was “fooling itself,” while others pointed out that something must be wrong with Beijing’s Taiwan strategy if the goal of unification seems to be increasingly distant. In a similar vein, some Weibo users also expressed confusion when the Hong Kong government withdrew the extradition bill that first provoked the city’s protests, wondering why the authorities responded to the protesters’ demand when they had been fed propaganda all along painting them as thugs backed by the CIA and other forces.

At least one account on Weibo that dared question China’s Taiwan strategy was shut down. Li Kan—the son of the late Taiwanese novelist Li Ao who is popular in China for his pro-unification views and for giving up studying in Taiwan to take a place at Peking University—had for weeks before the election warned the Beijing government that Tsai was going to win the election, and that its policies in both Hong Kong and Taiwan had backfired. After Tsai’s victory was announced, Li published a final post (link in Chinese) on Weibo applauding the result and tagged China’s Taiwan Affairs Office.
 

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The Clock Is Ticking: China Will One Day Invade Taiwan

The Clock Is Ticking: China Will One Day Invade Taiwan


Ian Easton

,
The National InterestJanuary 15, 2020



Key Point: America has some decisions to make.

Various sources from within the People's Republic of China have allegedly suggested that time is running out for Taiwan's democracy. In their narrative, China's iron-fisted leader, Xi Jinping, is "losing patience" and could order the invasion of Taiwan in the early 2020s. The world's most dangerous flashpoint might witness an overwhelming amphibious blitz, perhaps before July 2021 to mark the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

That's the narrative. The reality is that China will probably not attack Taiwan in such a radical and high-risk fashion. Xi and his top lieutenants are far more likely to draw-out and escalate the war of nerves across the Taiwan Strait. They will continue using disinformation and other techniques to drain Washington's confidence that Taiwan can be defended, while ramping up subversive activities to undermine the island nation's confidence and willpower.

Xi will bide his time and hope the Taiwanese government cracks under mounting pressure, allowing him to conquer his target cheaply. At the same time, his military generals will continue planning and preparing to deliver on their "sacred" mission. Coercion could easily fail, making invasion a tempting option―especially in a future scenario where the balance of power looks more favorable to Beijing than it does today.

Assessing the Threat:

The ever-tense political and security environment across the Taiwan Strait necessitates an accurate depiction of PLA capabilities, strengths, and shortfalls.

The PLA's strengths are more apparent than its weaknesses. China's military muscle is frequently highlighted and hyped up by the media, both in Beijing and abroad. Undoubtedly, China's ballistic missiles, cyber warfare capabilities, and counter-space weapons make it a force to be reckoned with. Perhaps even more dangerous are its espionage and covert actions abroad to shape foreign policymaking.
 

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U.S. increases support for Taiwan, China threatens to strike back

U.S. increases support for Taiwan, China threatens to strike back

TAIPEI/BEIJING (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump has signed into law an act that requires increased U.S. support for Taiwan internationally, prompting a denunciation by China, which said it would strike back if the law was implemented.

China claims democratic and separately ruled Taiwan as its own territory, and regularly describes Taiwan as the most sensitive issue in its ties with the United States.

While the United States, like most countries, has no official relations with Taiwan, the Trump administration has ramped up backing for the island, with arms sales and laws to help Taiwan deal with pressure from China.
 
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Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model

Taiwan leader rejects China's offer to unify under Hong Kong model
January 1, 2020, 3:19 AM GMT



Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen talks during a graduation ceremony for the Investigation Bureau agents in New Taipei City,
TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday the island would not accept a "one country, two systems" political formula Beijing has suggested could be used to unify the democratic island, saying such an arrangement had failed in Hong Kong.

China claims Taiwan as its territory, to be brought under Beijing's control by force if necessary. Taiwan says it is an independent country called the Republic of China, its official name.

Tsai, who's seeking re-election in a Jan. 11 vote, also vowed in a New Year's speech to defend Taiwan's sovereignty, saying her government would build a mechanism to safeguard freedom and democracy as Beijing ramps up pressure on the island.

Fear of China has become a major element in the campaign, boosted by months of anti-government protests in Chinese-ruled Hong Kong.

"Hong Kong people have showed us that 'one country, two systems' is definitely not feasible," Tsai said, referring to the political arrangement that guaranteed certain freedoms in the former British colony of Hong Kong after it was returned to China in 1997.

"Under 'one country, two systems', the situation continues to deteriorate in Hong Kong. The credibility of 'one country, two systems' has been sullied by the government's abuse of power," Tsai said.

Hong Kong has been hit by months of anti-government protests triggered by widespread resentment of perceived efforts by Beijing to exert control of the city despite the promises of autonomy.

Taiwan's parliament passed an anti-infiltration law on Tuesday to combat perceived threats from China, further straining ties between Taiwan and Beijing. [nL4N295146]

Tsai said the law will protect Taiwan's democracy and cross-strait exchanges will not be affected amid worries that the legislation may damage business ties with China.

China suspects Tsai and her independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party of pushing for the island's formal independence, and has threatened it with war if there was any such move.

Tsai denies seeking independence and reiterated that she would not unilaterally change the status quo with China.
Imagine telling this now to taiwan, :ROFLMAO:.
 
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Hong Kong blocks Taiwan from reaching disputed Pratas Islands, saying airspace around disputed territory is closed ‘until further notice’​

Hong Kong has blocked Taiwan from flying to the Pratas Islands in the South China Seaafter placing the flight path in a danger zone “until further notice”, according to new information released by Taipei.

The self-ruled island’s civil aviation authority on Friday night released a full transcript of the conversation between both sides, as new details emerged surrounding Hong Kong’s role in denying a Taiwan military plane permission to fly to the disputed territory on Thursday.

The development further stretched regional tensions following an intensification of Chinese military activity near the land mass in recent weeks.

During Thursday’s conversation, personnel at Hong Kong’s Civil Aviation Department (CAD) told their counterparts in Taipei there were “dangerous activities” below 26,000 feet, forcing the UNI Air flight carrying military and coastguard members to turn around before entering the city’s airspace.

Before the transcript was published, the CAD said it had “nothing further to supplement” when asked what the dangerous activities were and when it became aware of them. It declined to comment when contacted again on Saturday.

The initial revelations of unspecified activities in the area prompted Taiwan’s defence minister, Yen Te-fa,
to speak out on Friday. He said there was Chinese military activity in the area, and called on Hong Kong to come clean.

Hong Kong has said that Taiwan abandoned the flight plan of its own accord, which the other side disputes, saying it was denied permission to continue its journey from the southern port city of Kaohsiung.

The CAD also said its staff had followed “established practices and procedures”, and after warning the Taiwanese plane of the danger, it was the Taiwan side that cancelled the request to enter the city’s airspace.

According to the transcript, Hong Kong warned its counterparts in Taipei there was a danger zone en route to the disputed islands.
“I cannot tell you more, but there is a danger area over there … the danger zone is now valid until further notice,” Hong Kong staff told Taiwan, but refused to say whether military exercises were taking place.

When asked why a “notice to airmen” was not filed in advance to warn pilots of potential in-flight dangers, Hong Kong simply said there was no announcement.​


Taiwan then asked if the flight could enter Hong Kong airspace, and was told “the altitude is not safe because of danger after Hong Kong at this level”.
On seeking clearance to proceed to the Pratas the flight was told: “Hong Kong is not able to advise right now, we’ll let you know.”

The UNI Air flight then returned to Kaohsiung.
The Pratas Islands, known as the Dongsha Islands in Chinese and located within Hong Kong airspace, comprise one island, two coral reefs and two banks. They are located about 445km from Kaohsiung, and about 300km from mainland China.

While they are administered by Taiwan, they are claimed by Beijing, which considers Taiwan to be a renegade province. The islands fall within the Hong Kong aviation authority’s airspace.
Taiwan operates at least one flight a week to the islands, carrying government, military, and coastguard personnel, but they are off-limits to ordinary travellers.

Hong Kong has blocked Taiwan from flying to the Pratas Islands in the South China Sea after placing the flight path in a danger zone “until further notice”, according to new information released by Taipei.

The self-ruled island’s civil aviation authority on Friday night released a full transcript of the conversation between both sides, as new details emerged surrounding Hong Kong’s role in denying a Taiwan military plane permission to fly to the disputed territory on Thursday.

The development further stretched regional tensions following an intensification of Chinese military activity near the land mass in recent weeks.

During Thursday’s conversation, personnel at Hong Kong’s Civil Aviation Department (CAD) told their counterparts in Taipei there were “dangerous activities” below 26,000 feet, forcing the UNI Air flight carrying military and coastguard members to turn around before entering the city’s airspace.

Before the transcript was published, the CAD said it had “nothing further to supplement” when asked what the dangerous activities were and when it became aware of them. It declined to comment when contacted again on Saturday.

China threatens retaliation over US plans to supply Taiwan with arms​

The initial revelations of unspecified activities in the area prompted Taiwan’s defence minister, Yen Te-fa, to speak out on Friday.
He said there was Chinese military activity in the area, and called on Hong Kong to come clean.
Every Other Saturday

Hong Kong has said that Taiwan abandoned the flight plan of its own accord, which the other side disputes, saying it was denied permission to continue its journey from the southern port city of Kaohsiung.

The CAD also said its staff had followed “established practices and procedures”, and after warning the Taiwanese plane of the danger, it was the Taiwan side that cancelled the request to enter the city’s airspace.

According to the transcript, Hong Kong warned its counterparts in Taipei there was a danger zone en route to the disputed islands.

“I cannot tell you more, but there is a danger area over there … the danger zone is now valid until further notice,” Hong Kong staff told Taiwan, but refused to say whether military exercises were taking place.
When asked why a “notice to airmen” was not filed in advance to warn pilots of potential in-flight dangers, Hong Kong simply said there was no announcement.

Taiwan then asked if the flight could enter Hong Kong airspace, and was told “the altitude is not safe because of danger after Hong Kong at this level”.
On seeking clearance to proceed to the Pratas the flight was told: “Hong Kong is not able to advise right now, we’ll let you know.”

The UNI Air flight then returned to Kaohsiung.
The Pratas Islands, known as the Dongsha Islands in Chinese and located within Hong Kong airspace, comprise one island, two coral reefs and two banks. They are located about 445km from Kaohsiung, and about 300km from mainland China.

While they are administered by Taiwan, they are claimed by Beijing, which considers Taiwan to be a renegade province. The islands fall within the Hong Kong aviation authority’s airspace.
Taiwan operates at least one flight a week to the islands, carrying government, military, and coastguard personnel, but they are off-limits to ordinary travellers.